Nazi aircraft

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posted on Jun, 24 2003 @ 11:47 PM
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I want all the info and pics you have. Also we can talk about the aircraft. Some of their concepts were weird.




posted on Jun, 24 2003 @ 11:49 PM
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Weird? If i wasen't such a hardcore commie, my love of aircraft would have pushed me towards teh nazi!

www.luft46.com
best website around!



posted on Jun, 24 2003 @ 11:53 PM
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I been to luft44.com. Good info. Also how do you think the Germans developed these concepts before everyone else



posted on Jun, 25 2003 @ 12:10 AM
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Also I am no Nazi. I just find some of the aircraft concepts were interesting



posted on Jun, 25 2003 @ 12:48 AM
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To which aircraft are you refering? The paper projects that were generated near the end of WW 2 or the aircraft that were actually built and flown. Most of the projects you see at Luft46 were never even assigned RLM numbers, they only carried the companies internal Project Numbers. As such these projects did not even have much in the way of any official recognition and most just represented the dreamings of the aircraft desingers.



posted on Jun, 25 2003 @ 12:54 AM
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Those are the kind of aircraft I am talking about. I know some are littke known, but some are known, such as the American bomber. All I want is info and any pics, photos, or art work on the craft luft46 is describing



posted on Jun, 25 2003 @ 02:38 AM
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Originally posted by necro99
Weird? If i wasen't such a hardcore commie, my love of aircraft would have pushed me towards teh nazi!



Don't be ashamed Necro99. The commies have signed a pact with the nazis in 1939 and were allied with them. They just start to disagree on some points in 1941.



posted on Jun, 25 2003 @ 09:39 PM
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If you understand what my name stands for, then you will realize that I have some knowledge of the subject. However I personally do not spend very much time studying what is essentially Lippisch's and Vogt's SFF files (Science fiction and fantasy) when there were very significant aircraft (such as the He 119 and the He 178) that were actually built by the German aircraft industry and flown. Many of these aircraft are virtually unknown today except for a few aviation historians. These Luft46 guys treat these design projects as if they could be made into operational aircraft in short order when future events proved the basic concept of many of these design studies to be basically seriously flawed. Green in "Warplanes of the Third Reich" hardly considered these paper projects worth mentioning and Smith and Kay in "German Aircraft of the Second World War" barely gives them a chapter. It as if the trekkies don't have enough to do.



posted on Jun, 26 2003 @ 12:01 AM
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I found this on the same site.

Doesn't this look like the A-10 Thunderbolt? Except the turbofans are mounted on the wing.




[Edited on 26-6-2003 by barba007]



posted on Jun, 26 2003 @ 12:05 AM
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Ya, that is what a was thinking when I saw that picture too.



posted on Jul, 4 2003 @ 07:51 PM
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man they sure weren't good. we killed them in ww2. usa



posted on Jul, 4 2003 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by samtalkington
man they sure weren't good. we killed them in ww2. usa


My friend were lucky Hitler was a raving lunatic otherwise with the firepower that Germany had in 1939, they would have easily won the war. Not listening to his best Generals on key decisions lost Hitler the war. He thought he knew everything.
The Americans did put that last nail in the coffin though.



posted on Jul, 5 2003 @ 01:51 AM
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But the soviet shoved them in it, D-Day closed the cover.



posted on Jul, 5 2003 @ 12:23 PM
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Well, that's the aircraft bit of the topic gone: good old ATS.
J-flieger is quite right: to confuse "projects" with machines is at best optimistic. One's impression of the war-time German industry ( why call it "Nazi"?) was driven to hand in endless "projects" to the authorities to disguise the fact that nothing much that was real was actually happening, for all manner of factional and economic reasons.
Arguably, Britain's air industry was the most innovative: Mosquito, Meteor, for example, and continued to be for the fifties until the money just ran out: the Harrier was the swan-song.



posted on Jul, 7 2003 @ 03:24 AM
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Estragon, the German aircraft industry was quite innovative producing such aircraft as the BV 141 (asymetric), HE 178 (first turbojet powered aircraft), HE 119 (radical bomber with the engine buried in the fuselage), FI 156 (STOL aircraft used extensively by the Whermacht - this is the one used to rescue Mussolini). It seems that a lot of people are interested in paper projects while ignoring German aircraft that were actually built and which had a significant impact on aviation history. The venerable JU 52 probably changed our view of aviation power more than any other German aircraft.



posted on Jul, 9 2003 @ 12:14 AM
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quite agreed, j-flieger; but I'm thinking of how little that was new was actually produced in sufficient numbers and how innovations were frequently wrecked by political interventions: e.g. the Me262 having to serve as a fighter-bomber or the way the same airframes had to be adapted to new purposes.
It's been said with some justice that the Germans ended the war with much the same planes that they began the war and in terms of numbers that's quite true.
I'd agree that the Ju52 unloading paratroopers must be one of the most originally startling aerial images: bit I've always thought the Ju87 Stuka was one of THE air-power images: I'd put it beside the images of the B52's unloading what appears to be an endless stream of bombs over Hanoi.



posted on Jul, 9 2003 @ 12:43 AM
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Estragon, acutally the Ju 52 started changing views of air power back in the Spanish Civil War. The Germans sent a group of Ju 52's modified to be bombers to Spain at the start of the Spanish Civil War. However, before they performed any bombing missions, the Ju 52's were used to airlift 7,350 troops from Morocco to Seville in 461 flights beginning July 20, 1936 right over the heads of the Spanish Republican Navy. The flights also carried field guns, machine guns and other equipment. A further 5,455 troops were airlifted in 324 flights during September 1936, and an additional 1,157 troops were ferried in 83 flights in early October. The flights then terminated since the Republican Navy no longer poised a threat. Hitler stated that, "Franco ought to erect a monument to the glory of the Ju 52. It is this aircraft that the Spanish Revolution has to thank for its victory". That remark might of been somewhat of an over statement, but no historian has ever argued the fact that the additional troops from Morroco aided Franco in the consolidation of his position. As far as I know, this was the first ever major military air lift. There must have been a collective slapping of heads through out the air ministries of the world with a collective chorus "Of course, if you have transport planes, you can fly the troops there, you don't necessarily need ships." After this feat of the Ju 52 in Spain, there were no doubters as to value of transport aircraft in a country's avaition arsenal.



posted on Jul, 9 2003 @ 10:22 AM
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Indeed so, j-f: and as your splendid stats show this was a significant leap forward; but - purely on the issue of "images". I'd say the early WWII images are more compulsive: indeed, while I did know exactly to what you refer, I suspect it's somewhat recondite to all but the aeroplane buffs.
As for the Spanish Civil War: the Me-109 made its debut there (the Bf-109, I think). Oddly enough, it was the Italian airforce that was more prominent, and they did nothing later.



posted on Jul, 9 2003 @ 10:34 AM
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What is interesting is there is a company that is makeing ME 262's again, with modern engines , of course.

stormbird project



posted on Jul, 9 2003 @ 08:55 PM
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Estragon, indeed the images of German parachuting out of Ju 52's to seize key points in Belgium (and the images of Americans parachuting out of C-46's, or Dakotas as the Birts would say) are more compelling and more memorable. These represented on a small portion of the missions performed by these air craft. In fact the B-24 Liberator bomber was probably more important in the Pacific Theater as a transport aircraft than as a bomber. (The B-24 Liberator made a fine transport.) While the public remembers the paratroops, it was the ablity of transport aircraft to be able to airlift troops and supplies that became the bread and butter mission. In fact today, the military relies on transport aircraft to move troops and supplies to combat areas, it is now the preferred method. Would Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom be possible without a large fleet of transport aircraft to move troops and supplies into the combat zone??

There was a German company (check Jane's for 1999 and 2000) that was making a bmw powered version of the FW 190 (selling price $395,000). The plans was to make 8 of them I believe. The new version was supposed to be 98% reproduction of the original (new avionics - no guns of course). The company's plan was to make 8 ME 109's when it finished the FW-190's. You want to talk about the extreme in scale models?





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