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B-2 DMS-M

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posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:08 PM
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The B-2 fleet is preparing to undergo a massive upgrade, known as the Defensive Management System-Modernization. It is entering the EMD phase, before being installed on the fleet in the next three years. The Defensive Management System is used to tell the crews where radars, SAM sites and other threats are, using antennas on the aircraft. The upgrade will replace legacy systems with more advanced, newer systems, including new digital systems.

Most details of the upgrades are classified, but the new system will allow crews to identify high threat areas, and allow them to plan better avoidance of threats while in flight. The EMD phase will include CDR, hardware and software integration, integrated testing, and IOT&E. Three aircraft will participate in the EMD phase, with full rate production in 2019.


The Air Force is now testing new, high-tech sensors, software, electronics and other enemy radar-evading upgrades for its B-2 stealth bomber to preserve its stealth advantages and enable the aircraft to operate more effectively against increasingly capable modern air defenses.

The massive upgrade, designed to improve what’s called the bomber’s Defensive Management System, is described by Air Force developers as “the most extensive modification effort that the B-2 has attempted.”

The Defensive Management System is a technology designed to help the B-2 recognize and elude enemy air defenses, using various antennas, receivers and display processors to detect signals or “signatures” emitting from ground-based anti-aircraft weapons, Air Force Spokesman Capt. Michael Hertzog said in a written statement.

www.wearethemighty.com...




posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 12:04 AM
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Great find. We hear alot about how obsolete stealth is but people forget the USAF works hard to preserve the advantage as well. Its a pity they never exploited its ability to have a third crew member. You could set up a whole EW/ threat analysis evaluation to send back to other assets or perhaps control a stealthy UCAV wingman to provide an organic SEAD capacity
edit on 2/8/17 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 02:22 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Imagine upgrading the most advanced aircraft out there, hey, we are the only country with a Stealth Strategic Bomber by a long way, and we are already upgrading it before anyone else is nearly close!

I know a new entrant could include the latest tech already (would this be a B-21 technology?) but its still a great feeling!



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 07:09 PM
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I just read that they are putting "fricking lasers" on the B-52.

Should be interesting.



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: grey580

Just about all large aircraft are getting LAIRCM installed. Most will simply be bolt on kits.



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

wow.

i can see the internet pranksters putting pew pew pew sounds on b-52 flyby videos. lol



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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Mating a BUFF with a Wild Weasel?



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




The total program cost including development, engineering and testing, averaged $2.1 billion per aircraft in 1997.[3]


That is one damn expensive plane .



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

All stealth are. Upgrades have to ensure their stealth doesn't get affected by it, so it requires a lot more engineering than a standard aircraft upgrade would.



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

They tried that. The BUFF lost its tail when the Weasel hit it with a HARM. Heh.



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 08:44 AM
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It should be possible to determine the amount of radar energy being reflected off the aircraft in real time, so you can know at what range your aircraft will be detected from the source radar



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Why would it target the BUFF? Or did the HARM lock on to its radar seem like friendly codes would be used



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: penroc3

The tail gunner on the BUFF was using his radar to watch for threats behind the aircraft, where the Weasel was flying.



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