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The Great College Excuse-Mental Illness

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posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:30 PM
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I was listening to Clyde Lewis tonight and this interesting piece came out. So I tracked it down and brought it into the mud-pit for review.
The number-one mind-control program at US colleges

A few tidbits:

“More than 25 percent of college students have been diagnosed or treated by a professional for a mental health condition within the past year.”

Citation is in the link.

That's five million a year based loosely on a 20.5 million attendance rate in the U.S. Now, whilst I no doubt believe that there are very real and very debilitating mental illnesses that grasp some in their clutches, I do not think that the entire 5M/year is correct. These kids are given drugs and excuse and sent on their way....but how do they heal? Or perhaps that is not the end game goal.


And pretty soon, the whole idea of being triggered and needing a safe space makes sense to the student. He’s heading down a slippery slope, but he doesn’t grasp what’s actually going on. On top of that, the drug he’s taking is disrupting his thoughts and his brain activity. But of course, the psychiatrist tells him no, it’s not the drug, it’s the condition, the clinical depression, which is worsening and making it harder to think clearly. He needs a different drug. The student is now firmly in the system. He’s a patient. He’s expected to have trouble coping. And on and on it goes.


Is the result of this lunacy the kids we see across campuses countrywide that refuse to come to a debate table and use reasoning and logic to articulate their thoughts?




posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:42 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

Some will always use weakness/illness as an excuse for not achieving, for not succeeding.

I've seen men and women with missing limbs that were twice the people that some of these pussy's are.
edit on 7-2-2017 by DBCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

So at what point is it within the good of society to properly tell someone to "get over it." Or, it's not as bad as you think?" The coddling and pushing of drugs seems to be in complete opposition to pushing someone to achieve, especially within a college environment.

Indoctrinated by education and by drugs.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

Here is a novel idea as to what may be going on

In psychology, cognitive dissonance is the mental stress (discomfort) experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values, when performing an action that contradicts those beliefs, ideas, and values; or when confronted with new information that contradicts existing beliefs, ideas, and values
en.wikipedia.org... Now just how many more is it possible to hold at the same time before ........ ???? use your imagination ...consider the ramifications ... I read a piece that kind of showed the neuron connections in the brain and found that suffers of cognitive dissonance could be seen ...Its late and I am done for the night ...peace



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

It's not my place nor anyone else's to ever tell anyone what they can or cannot "get over".


It has to come from within.

People used to emulate others that would shake it off, keep on going, people would look up to and admire those individuals that were tough.

People used to be tougher.

Our society has grown weak. Tender.

Just my opinion, but it has some merit. When I got a knee replaced, the doc gave me a handicap sticker for my car and paperwork so I could stop working and be off on a total disability.

I gave everything back to him and went back to work.

But that's just me. I can't tell people to be tougher.

They either are or they aren't.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

Interesting!

By holding a set of contradicting standards you can create the mental illness. Knowledge is indeed power, which they should learn in a college environment. Instead echo chambers and safe spaces. Challenging ideas and beliefs is something only done at home and in the lower grades apparently.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Every combat veteran that I have ever known from Vietnam up to Afghanistan, has "worked" through it. I've been blessed that they have shared their stories and in some way, I hope it was therapeutic. I mean first person accounts of mangled bodies and hurt children. The stuff that would make an average mans blood go cold.

What these kids are deeming as a priority or excuse for a softer blow from that cudgel called life, in my eyes, is to put it lightly melodramatic.

I think society deemed it necessary for these men to "get over it."



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:21 PM
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Every single human being has some kind of mental disorder, or falls somewhere on some spectrum of a mental disorder.

I'm sure someone here will claim they're 100% perfect though.

"Ain't nothing wrong with my mind!"

All of us have elements of something, whether it's depression, anxiety, self-esteem issues, attachment issues, codependency, addiction, narcissism...
edit on 7-2-2017 by Kettu because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: Kettu

If we all have it then how can it be a disorder? Wouldn't a disorder indicate that there is a "normal?"

I would agree to your statement if you change disorder to condition. That would certainly put a stick in the spokes of traditional psychology eh? !

Applying different variances and depths to the condition could indicate a disorder.

Also, this is one quarter of all college students per year, if that statement was accurate, I think the number would lean higher, no?



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

It's called a spectrum, and we all fall along various spectrums.

If someone is to far on the depression spectrum, it becomes debilitating and they might need to see therapy or fix conditions in their life that contribute to the depression.

If someone falls to far on the anxiety spectrum, they might have trouble in certain life situations that the majority of other humans wouldn't.

None of us are perfect, and many of us learn how to hide and cope with our unique mental make up, forcing our outward appearance to fit into a standardized "normal" that somehow we've agreed to.

I can tell you from personal experience, most people don't even really know themselves. The vast majority of people in the world never spend much time getting to know themselves and who they really are. Most people spend a lot more time pretending to be what they feel fits in and what the world expects from them.

Protip: spend 5-10 minutes a day just thinking to yourself about yourself in a quiet place. The greatest wealth you can have is the enrichment of yourself.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:33 PM
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a reply to: Kettu




All of us have elements of something, whether it's depression, anxiety, self-esteem issues, attachment issues, codependency, addiction, narcissism...
I will agree with that but will add that the conditions today are treated with drugs that do nothing in the way of healing those issues .Depression requires a subject that you are depressed about and is not a feeling .Its easy to be anxious about cooking those lobster and having a feed but a lot of anxiety issues are about the feeling of anxiety ..big difference .And its a good thing that we can understand things like narcissism but even better if we can control ourselves to not act on those impulses . Knowing them and identifying within ourselves helps us to heal ourselves ."Physician ,heal thyself" is a real thing .



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: Kettu

So how is this proof of safe spaces, drugs, more labels and trigger warnings aid one to find out who they are if they can not widen their views?

It's embracing fear and bias. Here and in your anecdote.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:41 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: Kettu

If we all have it then how can it be a disorder? Wouldn't a disorder indicate that there is a "normal?"

All of it is normal in what makes us human to begin with. It's the degree of which sets being just another human apart from definitive mental health issues. If it puts significant hurdles up in daily life for an individual, then there's an issue that needs addressed.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:41 PM
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The problem is people today are encourage to look for their imperfections and then use them as an excuse for their failures. I'm depressed, because that is what everyone is tell me....My depression is why I'm failing in life...and so on....oh I need good drugs now that really don't help me other then to take me from my so called depression to suicidal.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:42 PM
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Need a culture change where instead of medicating we help people to deal with their problems...

Its something I have seen with a lot of older veterans, after 30+ years of the VA's standard response to any problem... opiates... Various veteran organizations have started handling the healing of the soul coupled with teaching coping with the problems.

If people that have gone through the hell of combat can learn to deal, it should be a snap to teach todays youth how to deal with the adversity of most of the mental health problems.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:46 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: Kettu

If we all have it then how can it be a disorder? Wouldn't a disorder indicate that there is a "normal?"

All of it is normal in what makes us human to begin with. It's the degree of which sets being just another human apart from definitive mental health issues. If it puts significant hurdles up in daily life for an individual, then there's an issue that needs addressed.


Would comparing an election to a tragedy on par with Pearl Harbor or 9/11 fall into the realm of mental disorder or lack of knowledge?

I'm not attempting to argue the existence of mental issues but the rate and cause that the labels are applied and how they are used as a crutch rather than a step up/forward.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:46 PM
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25% doesn't seem to high for college students. Spring break, mid-terms, bowl games, tuition and text book prices, lab partners, room mates, fraternities.

I'd like to see what percentage of congressmen could be diagnosed with some form of mental illness. Or the percentage of women I've dated. If you're talking about my family members, 25% would be shockingly low.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf




If people that have gone through the hell of combat can learn to deal, it should be a snap to teach todays youth how to deal with the adversity of most of the mental health problems.
Ego is and can be the barrier to even recognize that you need fixing ...most vets hit a bottom .Some get back up and some never do .



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

The irony here being that instead of learning new things and given all the facts, develop their own coping mechanisms to life, they are being doled a drug and a crutch while at college.

It's almost the definition of insanity.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:49 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero
The problem is people today are encourage to look for their imperfections and then use them as an excuse for their failures. I'm depressed, because that is what everyone is tell me....My depression is why I'm failing in life...and so on....oh I need good drugs now that really don't help me other then to take me from my so called depression to suicidal.


Good, we all should know what our faults and imperfections are. We should encourage people to be introspective and learn about themselves.

The self pity and victimization? That's on them. No one is forcing anyone to do that.

The culture and world we live in is cold, impersonal, fast-paced ... and TBH, quite grim. American culture glorifies and pushes things that very few will ever really attain.

It's no wonder people feel the need to be heard and have others pay attention to them.

We have a mutated and sick culture, born out of some twisted and perverted crony capitalism gone awry. It leaves people feeling empty inside, as they endlessly chase false hopes and dreams instead of learning how to make themselves the best they can be -- despite their flaws.

And if you want these pity-party "woe is me" victims to shut the hell up and go away ... don't give them the attention they seek by bitching and complaining about them. It's what they want.

I worry about myself and my own "back yard". If I'm nosing around and pointing fingers at other people, telling them to shut up or how they should be -- I'm not taking care of myself and my "yard". Eventually I'll turn around and find it's overgrown and I'm a total hypocrite, and just projecting my own insecurities about my own mental issues onto others.

Life lesson: take care of your own yard, mow your own grass and you'll be a lot happier.

edit on 7-2-2017 by Kettu because: (no reason given)



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