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What Does the Dept. of Education Actually Do?

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posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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I've been sort of halfheartedly following the Betsy DeVos drama surrounding her appointment as Secretary of Education, and today I decided to take a minute to visit the Dept. of Education website. I encourage all of you to do the same...here's what I found, the site is broken into four main subject areas:

Section 1: Student Loans.
Section 2: Grants.
Section 3: Laws.
Section 4: Data.

That's the Dept. of Education website in its entirety. Essentially, half of it is dedicated to the redistribution of wealth in the form of student (read: taxpayer funded) loans and government (read: taxpayer funded) grants.

The third section deals with laws related to education, but right at the very top of that page, it says the following: Please note that in the U.S., the federal role in education is limited. Because of the Tenth Amendment, most education policy is decided at the state and local levels. So, if you have a question about a policy or issue, you may want to check with the relevant organization in your state or school district. So essentially, there's very little content or legal oversight of education at the federal level, so this section is essentially useless save for a handful of laws that would be better implemented and managed at the state level anyway, as the Constitution dictates.

The last section is just a clearinghouse of various data sets pertaining to education in the United States. Valuable information no doubt, but information that would be very easily housed (and usually is) on the website of any trade group or organization whose purpose is to advocate for a particular profession. Don't need a government website to house this data.

So to sum up what the Dept. of Education actually does, is they simply act as a clearinghouse for siphoning billions of dollars from taxpayers. Then they turn around and decide who gets a portion of that money back, after the 4300 employees of said department skim their salary off the top. Some goes back to help fund local schools, who could have gotten that entire dollar directly from their local tax payer but instead they get 70 cents of it back after it's been laundered through Washington, and the rest goes to college students in the form of student loans and grants, who then attend colleges that jack their prices way up since they know the student doesn't care what it costs, as they're not paying the bill, the taxpayer does.

Then they make a few borderline constitutional laws here and there, and oversee a bit of research.

According to their website, that's their entire purpose for existing.

Have I got that right?

edit on 7-2-2017 by Subsonic because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2017 by Subsonic because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2017 by Subsonic because: typos




posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

Well for the past decade or so, apparently it hasn't done anything other than offer more funding for passing grades, which didn't necessarily have to equate to smarter, more educated children. They just wanted high graduation rates by any means necessary. Now here we are. High grad rates, lowest ever math and reading proficiency scores.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

So who decides what curriculum, what texts and goals?

They're not honest.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

Maybe we should just get rid of it.

That way, 100% of funding goes to the schools.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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Yeah, as the media and Democrats cry outrage over this appointment just remember the horrible job that is currently being done by people who supposedly know what they're doing.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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Some how kids could read, write, and do basic math prior to 1979 when the DOE was created.

We've spent hundreds of billions of dollars and can't show that children are any better off than prior to 1979 and as a direct result of this agency. Only government gets away with such waste.


+4 more 
posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

What Does the Dept. of Education Actually Do?

Over multiple generations, gradually water down the education curriculum to reduce critical and lateral thought processes. Simultaneously, gradually inject subjective political agendas of sexuality, race, religion and politics into daily education so that upon graduation society has a brand-new libtard.

The dumbing-down of state sanctioned indoctrination institutions like Berkeley are a testament to this. College is no longer about the pursuit of knowledge - it's the pursuit of Trump supporters for violent confrontations, creating safe spaces and determining the best way to be offended and channel that victimhood on off to those the lecturer told you to hate.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Subsonic

So who decides what curriculum, what texts and goals?

They're not honest.


That's all decided at the state and local level. If you're referring to federal level curriculum like Common Core, that too is not a requirement of states to follow. But...what the Dept. of Ed does is this: remember that money that they take from taxpayers and then give a percentage back to the local schools? Well, if the local schools don't play nice and follow their lead, then they don't get as much of that money back. They withhold funding. That's how they exercise their power.




posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:46 PM
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Think about it people.

Before the DOE. We put man on the moon.

WHAT have we done since it?



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
Some how kids could read, write, and do basic math prior to 1979 when the DOE was created.

We've spent hundreds of billions of dollars and can't show that children are any better off than prior to 1979 and as a direct result of this agency. Only government gets away with such waste.


I haven't looked at any charts, but I imagine that our reading levels and math achievement scores started decreasing about then.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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The Department of Education is a perfect example of how our government works.

1. Collect taxes.
2. Disburse funds with government requirements.

The "value added" here is "government requirements." Examples are "No child left behind." This requires a great deal of paperwork on the part of individual teachers and school districts, but there's no real evidence that it improves the education of our children. And, of course, all these requirements add to the burden and cost of "education" as the paperwork does not contribute anything. Some of these things sound good; they just don't do anything. Before there was a Department of Education many of these things were done by other agencies. Creating the Department of Education has basically just added to the bureaucracy even as our schools have declined. I leave it to you to determine if there is connection.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: Subsonic

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Subsonic

So who decides what curriculum, what texts and goals?

They're not honest.


That's all decided at the state and local level. If you're referring to federal level curriculum like Common Core, that too is not a requirement of states to follow. But...what the Dept. of Ed does is this: remember that money that they take from taxpayers and then give a percentage back to the local schools? Well, if the local schools don't play nice and follow their lead, then they don't get as much of that money back. They withhold funding. That's how they exercise their power.


Is there still a NEA? National Education Association, used to mean that school curriculum was nationalized, i.e., like you said through subsidies to help make them 'conform'.

One mans opinion...


In fact, most of these books fall far short of their important role in the educational scheme of things. They are processed into existence using the pulp of what already exists, rising like swamp things from the compost of the past. The mulch is turned and tended by many layers of editors who scrub it of anything possibly objectionable before it is fed into a government-run "adoption" system that provides mediocre material to students of all ages.

Edutopia



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:55 PM
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What?

You mean Devos won't actually be teaching classes?

Why are all these idiots whining about her not being a teacher then?



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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Nothing? It's a great example of bureaucratic red tape. It's like a horse, it looks nice, but it's a money pit that serves no purpose.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

I think it's more of a system to control local decisions by granting or withholding funds. There is no real good reason for it to exist to be honest as needs are very local and unique to the area the school is in.

The one size fits all idea is not working very well, but still they want to control. I see it as nothing more than a department of extortion. You don't do as we say, no money, when the money should be dealt out by student count without the Fed's trying to take local control away through subterfuge.

I need only look at the applications I review often to see how poorly things are going.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:29 PM
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As it happens, I just read that a congressman just introduced a bill to eliminate the Dept. of Education. It's about time.

Rep. Massie Introduces Bill to Eliminate Dept. of Education

So here's what I didn't mention in my OP: My wife is a public school music teacher of 16 years, and I'm a school administrator at a private arts college. We're both 'in the closet' so to speak when it comes to our views on the usefulness of the Dept. of Education, because you know, those open-minded academic types embrace all view points. Not.


I like the folks on this board, and I think I need new friends. Or maybe I need to move out of this town, ugh. If I posted this view on my Facebook page with my circle of Chicago-based artsy-fartsy academics I would be eviscerated for daring to speak out against the accepted Liberal dogma. Take it from someone from the inside - it's a freaking witch hunt in academia now, I would literally lose my job if I actually voiced any views that were even vaguely to the right of Jane Fonda. People around my parts are seriously losing their collective minds, glad to hear there are still level-headed folks elsewhere in this country.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
Think about it people.

Before the DOE. We put man on the moon.

WHAT have we done since it?


Since then we have managed to prove that it never happened.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

1. Dumb down the American public.
2. Brainwash children with centrally planned establishment agendas.
3. Generate Billions in debt.
4. All of the above.

There is no authorization in the Constitution for these bureaucracies to exist.

Its time that all of these illegal, unconstitutional departments and agencies be dismantled.

And the responsibilities should be sent to the individual states where they legally belong.


a reply to: Subsonic

Beautiful.

Rand will do the same on the Senate side.

Checkmate.

edit on 7-2-2017 by gladtobehere because: wording



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
Think about it people.

Before the DOE. We put man on the moon.

WHAT have we done since it?


Space Stuff.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: Subsonic

With an DOE annual budget of nearly 70 billion, that
would go a long way towards paying teachers
and invest in children's actual education.

Great topic by the way.


edit on 7-2-2017 by burntheships because: (no reason given)




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