It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Brains of Autistic Children Are Surprisingly Hyper-Connected

page: 1
27

log in

join
share:
+1 more 
posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:32 AM
link   
Not surprising, but still a surprise. Also, this is old news (2013) but I missed it. Posting in case others did too.



Brains of Autistic Children Are Surprisingly Hyper-Connected

From a non-autistic point of view, people with autism can seem somewhat disconnected in social and emotional terms. It’d be tempting to attribute this to differences in brain connectivity—wiring that never quite got connected—and in fact, this has been the prevailing hypothesis. But this week, researchers report that the brains of autistic children are actually more connected than the brains of non-autistic children are.

...Two new studies by independent teams have found that the brains of autistic children and adolescents are actually overconnected in comparison with the brains of non-autistic people—and that this hyperconnectivity takes on some distinctive patterns.

...In the San Diego study, brains of adolescents with severe autism showed strikingly greater resting connectedness than brains of adolescents with mild autism, which were in turn more connected than unaffected adolescents. And the same held true for younger children in the Stanford study: autistic children’s brains displayed much greater functional connectivity than the brains of their non-autistic counterparts did.

What’s more, the specifics of this hyperconnectivity provide some intriguing hints about the nature of autism. Both studies found that functional connectivity in autistic people’s brains was most increased in the visual and extrastriate cortices, which deal with sight; and in the temporal lobe, which plays crucial roles in processing and associating sensory input.





posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:46 AM
link   
a reply to: soficrow

This makes perfect sense when you consider frequent "savant syndrome" cases, like we see in the film Rain Man with Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman

Great find soficrow



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 10:48 AM
link   
a reply to: soficrow

This is interesting information,



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:17 AM
link   
Hell who knows. Maybe when we see autistic kids acting strange, they are visiting other realities or communicating with something. Could they actually be more evolved humans, that are maybe just short circuiting a bit? Got me thinking of Xmen and stuff.

edit on 7-2-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-2-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 11:25 AM
link   
Makes sense. Autism genes are associated with higher IQ in normal individuals. Is Autism a side effect of a higher IQ population?

Autism clusters appear to be around IT heavy areas
edit on 7-2-2017 by jellyrev because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:12 PM
link   
a reply to: soficrow

So in the context of evolution why are we as a society so focused on the social evolution of our children rather than the mental.

What if the autistic kids are the "normal ones" not the "well rounded" business man who sits in his cubical all day.
edit on 7-2-2017 by Observationalist because: Removed redunant question



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:40 PM
link   
Makes sense but also don't think it makes for all to be the same when it comes to how the connectivity affects them. Also, doubt that it has anything to do with the whole "Indigo Children" gimmick in the early 00s or otherwise.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 01:00 PM
link   
a reply to: soficrow

This is very interesting. My family has a lot of cases of autism and this was always something I thought about. My cousins are twins, and they both are at opposite ends of the spectrum.

One, was a virtuoso piano player by the time he was 8, while his brother still needs to be watched after and taken care of in his 20's.

I'm from a rural area and I remember my grandmother talking about how the water hole they would get water from was filled with pesticide runoff, and back in those days no one really worried about it.

I had the thought that maybe a cause of autism is some kind of inherited genetic change due to pesticide exposure that may take a generation or two to become apparent.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 01:21 PM
link   
I read something about this a while back. This research kind of dead ended in the news. It is probably true. If this is correct then there may be ways to boost cognition by actually increasing some specific nootropic chemistry. to get them to be able to use the array thinking better. I'm not sure how to do that, I have epilepsy and am trying to accomplish this but it would probably be way different in these kids. Having them avoid highly processed foods with multiple combined chemistries would probably have a negative effect, it sure does for me.

All my life I have probably been high level autistic. I know a few people who are like I was and they were diagnosed with that. I thought I was just normal and a little bit obsessive compulsive and a nitpicking perfectionist. But evidently that is a disease now. No wonder so many people wanted to hire me to do their jobs, hire the handycapped.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 01:45 PM
link   
I'm still waiting for the study that will finally come to the conclusion that humans are a freak of nature and there is no such thing as a normal human.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 02:10 PM
link   
Ever see autistic kids perpetually bob, back and forth, hyper-ventilate, walk in circles repeating the same mantra, or any ocd activity?

Guess what? These are the same exercises mystics use when creating chaos magick and spells. Interesting huh?



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: jellyrev
Makes sense. Autism genes are associated with higher IQ in normal individuals. Is Autism a side effect of a higher IQ population?

Autism clusters appear to be around IT heavy areas



Autism is clearly heritable - but epigenetically, NOT genetically! Think environmental.

Crap like the following makes me growl.




We know that genes is the primary driver of autism. We don’t know which genes, however. “There may be perhaps hundreds of genes that contribute to autistic traits,” said Francesca Happé of King’s College London.

It’s important to note that the authors of this twin study found a significant effect of environment, but the effect of environment was about one-half to one-third as the genetic effect. “Some parents are concerned whether things like high pollution might be causing autism,” Happé noted.




posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: jellyrev
Makes sense. Autism genes are associated with higher IQ in normal individuals. Is Autism a side effect of a higher IQ population?

Autism clusters appear to be around IT heavy areas


Epigenetic response.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:43 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks



...I had the thought that maybe a cause of autism is some kind of inherited genetic change due to pesticide exposure that may take a generation or two to become apparent.



Epigenetic change - not genetic. And yes, inherited, resulting from an epigenetic response to environmental contamination (or change).



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 05:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: jellyrev
Makes sense. Autism genes are associated with higher IQ in normal individuals. Is Autism a side effect of a higher IQ population?

Autism clusters appear to be around IT heavy areas

It is a long-standing myth, however, that all people on the autism spectrum have a higher-than-average IQ. Severe cases of autism are nothing like what's portrayed in movies such as Rain Man. Here's a video for anybody who wants to witness severe autism:



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 11:43 AM
link   
a reply to: Xaphan

Would you say autism involves enhanced sensory input, but not necessarily the ability to process that input?





posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 11:56 AM
link   

originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: Xaphan

Would you say autism involves enhanced sensory input, but not necessarily the ability to process that input?



Perhaps in some cases. Some of them seem to have the ability to process the input efficiently, but for some others it's 'sensory overload' as I've heard it described.




top topics



 
27

log in

join