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Hubble Captures Brilliant Star Death in “Rotten Egg” Nebula

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posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 02:35 AM
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I'd settle for a good comet or two. 20 years ago we had Hyakutake which made a surprise close-pass, and was followed a year later by Hale-Bopp, which was lovely and hung around for months.

*sigh*




posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 03:20 AM
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well if live there travvels with lichtspeed they just arrived in oure solarsystem....



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I'm glad it doesn't go faster then light.
I wonder what was left of the universe if it did.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Phage
A very very rare phenomenon indeed. Almost like straight out of a comic book, and any planet that could blow up? May as well consider it a star, some very volatile internal machinations there. Most planets however need help in said blowing up processes.

Just saying. Nothing much ever happens in the nights sky.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird




Nothing much ever happens in the nights sky.

Maybe you set your standards too high.
A conjuction never fails to fascinate me. Maybe my standards are too low.


edit on 2/6/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: Phage
Way to low. Imagine this Phage, you will never witness anything of substance or significance in your lifetime. Or your grandchildren grandchildren as well. Pretty depressing indeed. But I suppose there up sides to that. You know the Chinese warn about interesting things happening during your lifetime.

But I am quite sure you heard it and is quite redundant.

Let us just agree that nothing of any profoundness will ever happen for a very very very long long time.

The amount of "very's" in that sentence does not do it justice to the timescales involved here. But I had to stop at 3 because to better get a grasp on the timeline it not only would this whole thread have to be filled with the word "very" and "long" but all of ATS's threads which have ever been written.

Depressing indeed.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird




Imagine this Phage, you will never witness anything of substance or significance in your lifetime.

Astronomically?
You lie. I've seen Halley's comet. I've seen Hale Bopp. I have seen a total eclipse of the Sun.

Do you know that there will not be a supernova in my lifetime?
edit on 2/6/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: Phage
I think I have seen all three before. But I could not be bothered to look up. Sorry phage! You are off course quite correct. Your pretty smart right, so off course you are right. You have just gotten so used to the sub-mundane that the mundane seem spectacular.

And I quote Phage.


A conjuction never fails to fascinate me. Maybe my standards are too low.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird

Sorry to butt in, but in reply to this....


...you will never witness anything of substance or significance in your lifetime.


I wholeheartedly disagree.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird




Depressing indeed.

Only if you demand (or expect) to be entertained by the Galaxy.

edit on 2/7/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79
Its alright I guess. Its a good thing its pretty far for the naked eye and kind of a done and done thing.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 12:51 AM
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a reply to: Phage
Its a universe. I am pretty sure it does not listen nor care, kind of like getting water out of a rock with that one. In fact your much more likely to achieve getting water out of rock, a billion times a billion more likely.

As to the reasons why it continues to entertain? Don't ask me, it just does.

I like to call it a bizarre set of highly improbable practically none existent circumstances. Like getting hit by lightning 500 times in a row. Now who would be that lucky? And if they even get hit twice, or even once? Well! Maybe they should get out that hospital bed, and go out and play the lottery as well, maybe limp to the door and get a taxi. For it just may be the luckiest day of there entire life's.

What are the odds of that eh? Astronomical is the word. It conveys a number with many a zeros behind it, to many to write down or list.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: gortex




Some future body's home has just been born.

And somebody's current home went poof. Well, 5,000 years ago.



which should make earthlings stop and think.... we are # to the universe
it doesnt give a damn. So our endless chase for growth is useful only to a handful.
We would be better off making sure everyone here has a nice time for the short duration human life is... (shhh... dont tell anyone it wont happen in a couple of billion years)



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 02:01 AM
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a reply to: flice




we are # to the universe

Thank you for the opportunity to once again introduce...Grace and the boys.



posted on Feb, 9 2017 @ 06:14 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: gortex




Some future body's home has just been born.

And somebody's current home went poof. Well, 5,000 years ago.



Just that reality alone blows my mind, not only that just like that it was gone.....

But that it happened THOUSANDS of years ago while we were still using cuneiform to write on clay slabs, and were just now seeing it....

That just amazes me, literally looking back in time ...as we do every evening as we gaze upwards
edit on 2/9/2017 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)







 
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