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A Day-in-the-Life of a Radioactive Waste Management Complex Supervisor at the NNSS

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posted on Feb, 5 2017 @ 03:20 AM
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The NNSS is the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site.
day in the life

This video was recently uploaded. The Radioactive Waste Management Complex is on the NNSS/NTS tour.

My recollection of this part of the tour is the bus tires were being inspected with Geiger counter prior to us getting back on, though I can't tell you what we saw when off the bus. I guess I need a refresher tour. ;-)

BTW, I am very certain that is a voice actor doing the voice over.




posted on Feb, 5 2017 @ 03:44 AM
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Too bad we will never see one of these on WIPP. People have just written that whole thing off to the memory hole.



posted on Feb, 5 2017 @ 04:50 AM
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originally posted by: Bobaganoosh
Too bad we will never see one of these on WIPP. People have just written that whole thing off to the memory hole.


WIPP

These nuclear proponents talk a good game, but in the end, no one wants the nuclear dump in their back yard because...well...it is nuclear!



posted on Feb, 5 2017 @ 05:17 PM
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originally posted by: gariac
BTW, I am very certain that is a voice actor doing the voice over.


I watched this about a week ago, it almost played like a infomercial.



posted on Feb, 5 2017 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: FosterVS

One man's infomercial is another man's "community outreach. " ;-) People like to think these dumps are safe. Probably with 100% accurate knowledge of the waste, they could be safe. But institutional history is rough. People go in and out of organizations all the time, and at some point items lack historic knowledge.

Hence:

Blast from the past

During one of those plutonium dispersal tests at the Tonopah Test Range, they nuked a few animals. Post autopsy, they just buried at animals on the range. Sometime later it was decided that leaving a bunch of nuked animals in the ground was a bad idea. The report indicated that they had to find former employees to remember where they were buried.

You can fence off an area that is contaminated and anyone who can read will stay away, but critters won't. The desert has many burrowing animals.



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