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A MYSTERY - Why Did Bio-Supercomputing Go Dark?

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posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 11:23 AM
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About a year ago, a team of international scientists built a parallel processing supercomputer the size of a book - by using nanotechnology to create protein-based molecular motors. It uses less energy, runs cooler, is more efficient - and super-small. Besides hitting the science mags, the news made it into the International Business Times.

The work builds on the idea of combining machines with living organic material to create hybrid computers - which a decade ago, scientists predicted would happen. The bio-supercomputer model could only do math, and was not designed for faster speed than a regular computer. Researchers said the goal was to provide ‘proof of concept’ and the next step might involve a biocomputer-computer hybrid (making it a hybrid-hybrid?).

I’ve been watching for updates since the original announcements. There’s been nothing about biocomputers, super or not. The last entry for a Google news search of “parallel processing biocomputer” is Apr 20, 2016. For “biocomputer” it’s Feb 28, 2016.

On the other hand, biocomputing (the verb) brings up a few more entries. Recent advances in bio-computing and artificial intelligence are changing the world of robotics as we know it and new robots are now “learning” to make autonomous decisions based on programming.

As for supercomputers, public attention has been shifted exclusively to quantum computing - even though no working quantum computer has been developed yet.

So what happened to the bio-supercomputer? Did it die in the lab? Is it underground for tweaking? Did all the investors go quantum? Was the bio-supercomputer technology appropriated under Obama’s Executive Order (EO) 13702 for the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI)? By the US military? …Or am I not using the right search terms?


Anybody know?




BIO-COMPUTING

Biological Computing

Biocomputers use systems of biologically derived molecules—such as DNA and proteins—to perform computational calculations involving storing, retrieving, and processing data. …The development of biocomputers has been made possible by the expanding new science of nanobiotechnology.



Building living, breathing supercomputers



Biological supercomputer uses the 'juice of life’

Bio-computer uses less energy, runs cooler and is more efficient

Using nanotechnology, proteins and a chemical that powers cells in everything from trees to people, researchers have built a biological supercomputer.

…Nearly a decade ago, scientists predicted that within 15 years hybrid computers would be operating with a combination of technology and living organic material.

…"It's hard to say how soon it will be before we see a full-scale bio-supercomputer."

He added that to enable the bio-computer to take on more complex problems, one solution might be to combine the bio-machine with a conventional computer to create a hybrid device.



Using nanotechnology to create parallel computers

……Biological computers use a strategy similar to that of so-called quantum computers. Quantum mechanics uses qubits – ones and zeroes – whereas biocomputers use molecules that work in parallel.

“The fact that molecules are very cheap and that we have now shown the biocomputer’s calculations work leads me to believe that biocomputers have the prerequisites for practical use within ten years. Certainly, quantum computers can be more powerful in the long term, but there are considerable practical problems involved in getting them to work”, states Heiner Linke.

“Another big advantage is that molecular motors are very energy efficient. A biocomputer requires less than one per cent of the energy an electronic transistor needs to carry out one calculation step”, he adds.

The current study showed the solution to a well-known combinatorial problem, ‘Subset Sum Problem’. Compared with a sequential computer, a parallel computer can take a drastically shorter time to test all the solutions for a problem. (In mathematical terms: N^2 compared with 2^N, where N represents the size of the problem).



Scientists have managed to shrink a supercomputer to the size of a book using biological motors

…can solve mathematical problems as quickly as a supercomputer because it operates in parallel rather than in sequence.

Researchers from Lund University, Linnaeus University, University of California Berkeley, Dresden University of Technology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the University of Liverpool, McGill University, Molecular Sense Ltd and Philips Innovation Services have used nanotechnology to create molecular motors that can perform several calculations simultaneously rather than sequentially. ….

…….Their research, entitled “Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks“ is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).



The model “biocomputer,” which is roughly the size of a book, is powered by Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) — dubbed the “molecular unit of currency.”





...........cont'd




posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 11:24 AM
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......cont'd, page 2


BIO-COMPUTING and AI


Recent advances in bio-computing and artificial intelligence are changing the world of robotics as we know it and new robots are now “learning” to make autonomous decisions based on programming.



7 Images Show the Latest in Soft Robotics



Aug 3 2016: How Hackers Could Get Inside Your Head With ‘Brain Malware’

Brain-computer interfaces offer new applications for our brain signals—and a new vector for security and privacy violations.

…It's a futuristic scenario, but not that futuristic. The idea of securing our thoughts is a real concern with the introduction of brain-computer interfaces—devices that are controlled by brain signals such as EEG (electroencephalography), and which are already used in medical scenarios and, increasingly, in non-medical applications such as gaming.

Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle say that we need to act fast to implement a privacy and security framework to prevent our brain signals from being used against us before the technology really takes off.

"There's actually very little time," said electrical engineer Howard Chizeck over Skype. "If we don't address this quickly, it'll be too late."

…"Broadly speaking, the problem with brain-computer interfaces is that, with most of the devices these days, when you're picking up electric signals to control an application… the application is not only getting access to the useful piece of EEG needed to control that app; it's also getting access to the whole EEG," explained Bonaci. "And that whole EEG signal contains rich information about us as persons."

…”You could see police misusing it, or governments—if you show clear evidence of supporting the opposition or being involved in something deemed illegal," suggested Chizeck. "This is kind of like a remote lie detector; a thought detector."

"Once you put electrodes on people's heads, it's feasible”

…"It's technically becoming feasible; once you put electrodes on people's heads, it's feasible," said Chizeck. "The question is, do we want to regulate it, can we regulate it, and how?"




QUANTUM


Building a computer that is smarter than humans is vital to solving the world’s most complex problems …February 1, 2017: we don’t yet have a quantum computer; physicists don’t even agree on the construction material to build one. There will be countless scientific and engineering dead-ends, innovations, and breakthroughs before we have any chance of building an artificial quantum brain.



2 February 2017: Scientists have just published plans for what could be the most powerful processor ever – a quantum computer.

The international team behind the project have released their work open source in Science Advances so other scientists can build on it.

…the team are working on a prototype at the University of Sussex, which should be completed in two years.



Quantum Computing Progress Will Speed Up Thanks to Open Sourcing






edit on 3/2/17 by soficrow because: format



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: SpeakerofTruth

Your point? Are you suggesting time crystals will crack quantum computing and make the bio-computer obsolete? Or what?



Yao is hard put to imagine a use for a time crystal, other proposed phases of non-equilibrium matter theoretically hold promise as nearly perfect memories and may be useful in quantum computers.




posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 12:46 PM
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I bet the it goes the way of antigravity in the mid 1950's.
So many articles, so many promises & from major producers,
then all goes dark.
Like we were reverse engineering a disc and the Russians
launch Sputnik. It gave us a wake up call and we had to play
catch up because our heads were in anti gravity Sci Fi land.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:03 PM
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a reply to: UnderKingsPeak

The bio-supercomputer was real, and it worked. Definitely not in "Sci-Fi land."

I'm hoping someone here has some hard information.

Anyone



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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From your source:

"Once you put electrodes on people's heads, it's feasible."

That is a feint. The can use airwaves for intercepting/interfacing brainwaves. Around the clock encephalograms,
for everyone. Because they can. Be careful, be selective, before you think. About anything. Just as though you were in the presence of God hisself.

You may as well believe that in order to use a satellite phone, you must have wires strung out to space. Or, that because you paid $600 for a frequency counter, your room has no spy receivers in it, since, you know, there was no red light flashing.

The grid. It is already in place. A one way metering valve ('smart' meter), acts to isolate all activity (electrical); pulsed ultra high frequenices, and powerful computers do all this already. Now. Today, not tomorrow. This isn't as sexy as communicable illness, but I thought you should know.

# 663
edit on 3-2-2017 by TheWhiteKnight because: He also taught them a witch doctos's method of diagnosis, by holding their urine up to a light in a beer glass.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: TheWhiteKnight

Right, but not on topic.


Seriously, I need hard information about bio-supercomputers.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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There's the work being done by Dan Nicolau of McGill University in Montreal and engineer Heiner Lenke from Lund University in Sweden. They had built a proof of concept model last year, but they said the next step would be to build a larger one -- which I assume may take a while for them to fund, plan, figure out, and execute (probably several years, if they can do it at all).

Here is an article and excerpt from last year (early 2016) about this:

Biological Supercomputer Created By Scientists At McGill University

Now, as previously stated, the Nicolau biological supercomputer is just a model and not the end goal they are intending to reach. There is a lot more work and research that is going to be required in order to take this beta-like biocomputer/supercomputer from a model to a full-size functional supercomputer.



Nicolau, et al. published a paper about their ideas for biological supercomputers back in 2015, links provided below:

Abstract:
ABSTRACT -- Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks

Full PDF (link opens directly to a PDF)
FULL PDF -- Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks.


I posted a couple of your links in the OP, and am hoping for follow-up info. Have been watching since last February, but haven't seen any updates. Which is odd, given that most developers fall all over themselves to get in the news and generate investment. So I'm wondering what's up.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 01:55 PM
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originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: UnderKingsPeak

The bio-supercomputer was real, and it worked. Definitely not in "Sci-Fi land."

I'm hoping someone here has some hard information.

Anyone





I do hope someone has info on biocomputing
for you .Oh and the antigravity studies were quite real.
en.m.wikipedia.org...
rense.com...
gizadeathstar.com...
edit on 3-2-2017 by UnderKingsPeak because: link

edit on 3-2-2017 by UnderKingsPeak because: link 2

edit on 3-2-2017 by UnderKingsPeak because: sp

edit on 3-2-2017 by UnderKingsPeak because: link3



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:02 PM
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When you talk about big end computing it could be worth it as you'll probably need various people to keep it running and feed it and there aint many people who have the understanding of the tech so like the NSA/GCHQ etc.

The problem is scaling it down to the smaller end and the maintenance required by the looks of it, small businesses are not going to want to regularly spend money on stuff other than electricity to keep their kit running.

But when you get to the average datacenter style thing which runs lights out it would seem a very expensive thing to have with the maintenance versus current tech.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: soficrow

About a year ago, a team of international scientists built a parallel processing supercomputer the size of a book - by using nanotechnology to create protein-based molecular motors. It uses less energy, runs cooler, is more efficient - and super-small. Besides hitting the science mags, the news made it into the International Business Times.


I don't see that it was ever a reality.

From your source...


The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers. The discovery opens doors to the creation of biological supercomputers that are about the size of a book.


As far as I can tell, it was hypothetical and no real supercomputer has been made as of yet.


edit on 3-2-2017 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

There definitely was a functioning model - using Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a power source - just not a full-scale supercomputer. So not hypothetical. ...But no real bio-supercomputer either.



Still, seems like the tech is making its way into medical applications, at least.


NOTE:


Scientists have managed to shrink a supercomputer to the size of a book using biological motors

…can solve mathematical problems as quickly as a supercomputer because it operates in parallel rather than in sequence.

Researchers from Lund University, Linnaeus University, University of California Berkeley, Dresden University of Technology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the University of Liverpool, McGill University, Molecular Sense Ltd and Philips Innovation Services have used nanotechnology to create molecular motors that can perform several calculations simultaneously rather than sequentially. ….

…….Their research, entitled “Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks“ is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).



The model “biocomputer,” which is roughly the size of a book, is powered by Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) — dubbed the “molecular unit of currency.”







edit on 3/2/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: soficrow
The big problem with anything biological is operating range. Usually they are limited in pressure/temperature regimes and would require aqueous solutions or at least solution in alcohols. This means that they can easily be killed by heat, pressure change, or ambient atmosphere. Proteins denature just like meat spoils and I would guess that the lifetime of such a computer may be much shorter than existing. My guess is that they are playing with this and trying to figure out how they could make a working model that has an operating system.

Don't look for any "grow-your-own" computer ads anytime soon.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: pteridine

My thoughts exactly, The effort to actually keep and maintain this gloop of mass would probably cost more than its value for most people and businesses.

How do replace cellular decay as nothing last forever



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:40 PM
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Last I heard they are focusing it more with 3d printing. I imagined they would take the other side of things dark and only let us in on the economical aspect of it. This was a year ago. The other documentary I saw seemed as if a few years at the least of research and development will be ongoing as to everything was still a concept or computer models and calculations and what have you.

a reply to: soficrow



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: soficrow




So what happened to the bio-supercomputer? Did it die in the lab?


Nope. It is still in the lab. Some things simply take longer from research to market.

Also my impression is that bio computers will be used mostly to solve specific sets of problems that map well to them, very much like currently available quantum computers (d-wave).



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: pteridine




Proteins denature just like meat spoils and I would guess that the lifetime of such a computer may be much shorter than existing.



Hmm. Except that prion proteins are incredibly stable.

Yipes.



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