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Mummified royals who loved tattoos and cannabis

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posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 11:07 AM
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sounds like they knew how to have a good time.....tatoos....cannabis....spoked wheels.....dayum!




posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 11:10 AM
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Really really cool, love the tapestry, carriage is neat too..I'm pretty sure the herb was loved and used for a great many thing's since the dawn of time



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Wow, I missed that posting! tnx !



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: Flavian

I'm no expert..

But the terracotta army had spoke wheels as well.
Thats dated around the same time, around 2200 years ago.



Wikipedia:




The spoked wheel was invented to allow the construction of lighter and swifter vehicles. The earliest known examples are in the context of the Sintashta culture, dating to ca. 2000 BC.

edit on 2-2-2017 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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Aw thats great they had EMO circus people
just like we do now ! What a fantastic plant btw
let's give it up for our long time companion !



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

Eyyy!

Stay green!

I'm amazed at the whole find, how well everything was preserved.... the tatoo, textiles, carriage and w33d. You'd be hard pressed to find the same level of preservation for even just 500 years ago



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

Don't get me wrong, I'm aware that spoked wheels existed many thousands of years before the Mongols!

I just meant it was a bit weird that the Mongols give credit to Tsubodai in the 13th century and yet here in the Altai mountains is a Sycthian spoked chariot from 3000 years before that. Mongols were amongst the peoples included within the Sycthian tribes, inferring they already had that knowledge.

Maybe I'm just seriously over thinking it though!



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: LuXTeN
a reply to: weirdguy

haha hell yeah lets snort them!

Can you imagine if instead of walking up and grabbing a handfull of soil to throw into the grave the priest/holyman offered you a line of your finest Granny. Ahahahaha



posted on Feb, 2 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: dogstar23

originally posted by: Brotherman

originally posted by: Sublimecraft
a reply to: EartOccupant

Here is a 2700 year old bag of MJ


www.oddee.com...
www.nbcnews.com...-HwkeOSzCs


Nearly two pounds of still-green plant material found in a 2,700-year-old grave in the Gobi Desert has just been identified as the world's oldest marijuana stash, according to a paper in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Botany.
A barrage of tests proves the marijuana possessed potent psychoactive properties and casts doubt on the theory that the ancients only grew the plant for hemp in order to make clothing, rope and other objects.




I wonder if this guy knows that's the wrong glass apparatus for that substance???


What really impressive is how well preserved that 2700 year old Ziplok® is!


lol



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 04:20 AM
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I hope they at least left some dank munchies for the afterlife too



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Ugh! I think at that point i'd have to be really f'cked up to do that haha



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 04:37 AM
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a reply to: tribal

Yeah it sounds like the weed store up the street.



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: Flavian and Earthoccupant

Just looking at the terracotta cart compared to the one from the Altai which, to my eye, doesn't look particularly serviceable, I am wondering whether they were emulating elite burials that they had witnessed in China...I think the article suggests that the tattoos may indicate cultural connections (as have other finds in the region). Or is the chariot just fragile looking due to degradation over time? If not then perhaps they knew the principle of spoked wheels but lacked the technology to replicate anything more than a rough facsimile, perhaps?



posted on Feb, 3 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Anaana

May I add another option?

It could be that they had an excellent knowledge of the different kinds of wood.

Some woods are stiff, some are extremely bend-full, when you choose the right kind of wood.. it could make a difference between a comfortable ride, or a bumpy ride.

I don't underestimate our predecessors, and i think they knew exactly what they where doing.

Although i could also go with the fact that they would use another kind of structure for a funeral gift , because the ghosts travels light ; )


edit on 3-2-2017 by EartOccupant because: Supernatural occurrence



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 03:38 AM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
Some woods are stiff, some are extremely bend-full, when you choose the right kind of wood.. it could make a difference between a comfortable ride, or a bumpy ride.



That's precisely the technology that I suspect that they were lacking - steam bending wood. I see mimickry in the Altai cart but no evidence that they had developed the craft of the wheelwright.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

wish you were my ananny =) your awesome



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

Brotherman! It dawned on me the other day that I read at some time that you're in Pennsylvania, and you're a welder...are you the reincarnation of Richard Shaver?



I don't think I'm being particularly awesome here, reading up about it and I can't find whether steam bending is actually involved in wheelwrighting it's a little more complex than I had thought and the flexibility (and thereby increase of comfort) is more to do with the interactions between the woods (oak and ash especially)...but either way, I still feel the Altai cart is them attempting to copy the practices of a nobility/elites that they had witnessed, and given the Altai's position strategic to the Pontic Steppe, that could have come from either direction in theory but the spokes support the suggestion that the influence came from the East.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

LOL my thoughts on this are probably fairly far outside of the norm in regards to what I think about ancient mechanical assistance then what I am willing to really talk about in depth here from my point of view. The invention of the wheel is imho a common sense thing, people would have you believe early man was smelting metal for tools before they invented a wheel from some of the things I had been "taught" in school. All I can do is throw my hands out to the side and say WTF, our ancestors don't get enough credit for having means to overcome problems of their times without some smart ass and their eureka moment becoming a scientific principle when it defies common sense and human intellect.

I can't speak to the veracity of Dick Shaver (he did go by Dick btw ironic eh?) however I do have some old magazines laying around with his writings in them along with NASA Reel to Reels, and really old (original print) HP Lovecraft books and magazines along with other odd things I had inherited.
edit on 7-2-2017 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

No-one, people or otherwise, has me believing anything


Dick Shaver sounds painful.



posted on Feb, 8 2017 @ 02:53 AM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol

originally posted by: LuXTeN
a reply to: weirdguy

haha hell yeah lets snort them!

Can you imagine if instead of walking up and grabbing a handfull of soil to throw into the grave the priest/holyman offered you a line of your finest Granny. Ahahahaha


Ok, now that's just #ing strange dude....



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