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When there are no longer books................

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posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:35 AM
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So, i have been doing a lot of thinking lately, namely about the state of the world and what is happening. This thought process has led me down many roads, but one thing is really starting to stand out. I was in a charity shop the other day picking up a few old books, ones about history, geography, survival etc, and it got me thinking.

> Everything is going digital, books are being replaced by Kindles etc
> The new generation has been coined millennials, they are literally connected to everything digitally (IOT) The Internet of Things
> Book stores are closing down everywhere, and books are slowly been phased out by Digital versions.
> Knowledge is being committed online, from solid tangible objects people are uploading their data into clouds.

NOW CONSIDER THIS:
> In five years time, books no longer exist, or those that do are protected or in special places
> Everything has gone digital - IOT (Internet of Things)
> All knowledge exists in a cloud

AND NOW THIS:
> EMP strike
> Earth directed solar flare
> Government decided to change history online because it does fit their agendas (just look at the Disinformation and propaganda bill that was passed by Obama on the 24th December 2016)

MY point is this, if everything goes digital and solid tangible objects like books are gone, then our only source of knowledge is online or in our heads, or from an an older generation. If your government or TPTB wanted to change history or alter the general thought process of the masses they could do it at a click of a button, if there is no physical alternatives then there is no way to prove or disprove what they are saying.

Look, I genuinely think that it is important to have knowledge, but i think it is more important to have this in such a way that it is a solid tangible thing that cannot be altered digitally. Here is a link to the ultimate survival guide, they are all downloadable and free, you could put it on a USB, or print it off, i would do both and then one day, in the future, you will perhaps have the most valuable resource out there, Knowledge.

Ultimate Survival Guides

Up to you, but just wanted to give you a heads up : ) Also, if anyone wants to add other information source links on here about History etc, what to do when there isn't a doctor, dentist etc, that would be great, we could all then download as much as we want, before eventually its gone.
edit on 1-2-2017 by Nustle because: added additional sentence




posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:40 AM
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a reply to: Nustle

Yeah no. How likely is it we ever have an EMP? Compared to how much do we need the air trees produce? Now.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:43 AM
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That was a hypothetical example, my concern is the digital movement and the vulnerability / susceptibility of it, fail to prepare, prepare to fail. a reply to: Peeple



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: Nustle

I think that realistically speaking, the only answer to any of this, is to get what hard copy of historical texts, physical books, files, documents, photographs exist and secure them.

Seed vaults protect seeds from myriads of plants which are vital for ecology on this planet, against the possibility of a mass devastation event, like a nuclear war, or other globally effective event. The same should be done with information. The Library of Alexandria fell, burned, was sacked and much of its contents destroyed, the scribes and curators murdered. Their position was not hardened enough to withstand what befell it.

Any such informational repository therefore, would have to be bunker based, defended expertly and in a location kept under the strictest secrecy. If it could be achieved without the necessity for any government to be involved, I think that would probably be quite beneficial.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:53 AM
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Have an extensive home library among my collection are first editions of 16th & 17th century books .
Will manage just fine here without digital media .



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 04:55 AM
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Good point, Seeds storage is also great idea on an individual level. a reply to: TrueBrit



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:03 AM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Nustle

Yeah no. How likely is it we ever have an EMP? Compared to how much do we need the air trees produce? Now.


Considering our vulnerability to it? Pretty likely, doesn't have to just be a man made EMP to have the same effect



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:05 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I'm not sure how small, the smallest EMP bomb can be but a few key sites is all it would take.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:14 AM
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There doesn't need to be a solar flare or anything like that.
World-wide social turmoil could also break down the internet, and there is nothing implausible about world-wide social turmoil (especially if climate change fufils the most pessimistic forecasts).



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:17 AM
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I will have a set of the books we had at home when I was wee - Eliot's Five Foot Shelf, an enduring testament to exposing kids to classics early on, without telling them that it's beyond them.

I have a very good set of the 1910 ones, it is a very nice start on education, as they were sold to many in the Appalachians, along with a Brittanica and a set of 60's Childcraft, and we had them handed down from the great grandparents.

I recall being in junior English back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth and the much-feared junior English Lit teacher said "'It may be that the gulfs will wash us down. It may be we will touch the Happy Isles, and see the great Achilles, whom we knew' how would you go about finding what work that was from?", noting that this was far before the Internet, the answer she sought was, of course, was the name of a then-common compendium of literary quotes. The one I gave, being a smartass was "Ask me, for a buck I'll not only tell you who said it, I'll explain what it's supposed to mean, five bucks gets you a class paper"

The issue being, any literate person should immediately recognize it. The Five Foot Shelf was an attempt to provide a liberal arts education to anyone who had 15 minutes to an hour a day to concentrate on it. And it worked. It's far from perfect, and current educators detest it because it's no longer politically correct, but it is an indispensable set of books for general education s/p zombie apocalypse.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:18 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

It's still just "leaving a record" vs surviving. And as long as we have maintenance, we're fine.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:31 AM
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Did anyone else, on seeing this thread's title immediately think of the film Fahrenheit 451? Its worth a watch if you want more to consider regarding this subject.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: Nustle I've read more than hundreds of valuable books. I like to throw away things the moment they become obsolete. I had gave away all my books to friends and charity, except five which I keep from the same point of view as you. Hermetic essays tome, The Great Art(from where my nickname here draws inspiration), The first and the last freedom(this one my wife brought up), QiGong tome and the classic in martial arts Dian Xue Shu. I am not that much afraid that it will be impossible to find a good read in the future, than the tendency the good books not to be read by the young people. Thus I try preserve on paper only what is most valuable, so it really makes impact on our grand-grand children, which find it on the attic or other stashy place.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:41 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

Truth be told, I've got enough technical books and classic lit to stock the local library in Toccoa.

I have this idea that I'll build a new three car garage at the end of the driveway in the style of the old house, and the top story will be a library. I could quite easily stock one, if you were really into math, electronics and physics. I have several thousand technical books, hundreds of classical lit, hundreds more of popular lit. I'd like to unbox them and put them up properly where I could see what all I have.

That doesn't count the hundreds of books I've given to the library there and to the one in Pensacola. I also buy library cleanups at military bases, sort through them and pass on the ones I don't need to others.

It's odd, the two things I could equip a small third world country with are books and firearms.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 05:57 AM
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Even with an EMP I am sure there will still be some good old fashioned books around. Plus people who knew how to print them. If anything, all an EMP would do was cause a paper book publishing Renaissance.

Maybe publishers need to look into it. To boost sales. Just imagine Keeping up with the Kardashians in book form. Although I don't know how they would do the Bachelor.




posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

www.hemphasis.net...

"Making paper from trees is kind of a joke, because trees are made up of only 30% cellulose. The other 70% of the tree must be removed using toxic chemicals, until the cellulose can be formed into paper. The higher the percentage of cellulose in a plant, the better, because fewer chemicals need to be used, and less work needs to be done before the paper can be made. Almost any plant in nature with a strong stalk is better suited to make paper than trees, especially hemp because it can be 85% cellulose.

Hemp makes paper stronger and which lasts centuries longer than wood paper, which could be very valuable for people who want to keep records aside from on computers. Hemp paper does not yellow, crack, or otherwise deteriorate like tree paper does now. The acids which are needed for wood paper eventually eat away at the pulp and cause it to turn yellow and fall apart. Because of this publishers, libraries, and archives have to order specially processed acid free paper, but they could just buy hemp paper which already meets their quality standards."

Now can someone tell me why these conglomerate bastards are cutting down our beautiful trees....
also im sure it is quite possible for the sun to emp our electrical grids, which would be bad im guessing



edit on 1-2-2017 by Davg80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 06:53 AM
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originally posted by: Nustle

Also, if anyone wants to add other information source links on here about History etc, what to do when there isn't a doctor, dentist etc, that would be great, we could all then download as much as we want, before eventually its gone.


A current version of Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body would be a handy tome to have on the shelf. From a purely selfish standpoint, I'd also like to have the old-form Britannica volumes of World Classics, and History of the World.

The Foxfire Book and the 11 companion books, from the perspective of the Appalachian culture and in the form of storytelling, cover everything from beekeeping to midwives and granny women. How-to stories about making a foot operated lathe, planting by the signs, home remedies, making tar, making soap, making hampers and baskets from white birch switches, preserving vegetables and fruits, raising sheep to weaving wool, iron making and blacksmithing, animal care, summer and fall wild plant foods, building a smokehouse, making moonshine, and gobs of other how-to primers reveal how an entire culture eked out a living while raising generations under the harshest of economic and regional conditions.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 09:42 AM
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I suppose this means that the countless hours spent learning to glass blow blindfolded were for nothing after all...




posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 10:48 AM
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We have traded conditional freedom for unconditional chains.....we could hide and reproduce books but we cannot hide and reproduce internet data.



posted on Feb, 1 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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originally posted by: Nustle
That was a hypothetical example, my concern is the digital movement and the vulnerability / susceptibility of it, fail to prepare, prepare to fail. a reply to: Peeple


I totally get what you are alluding to, and I have thought of it myself. I think for me the biggest concern is the absolute ability to control a narrative and rewrite history with the digitization of books. The fact is that physical books are never going to disappear completely. While we will see more and more released only digitally there will always be a demand for words written on Paper.

Just look at Records, they went from really obscure to back to billion dollar industry. If nothing else, it will become hip and trendy to read an actual book.




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