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WAR: Iraq Votes: Defiant Iraqis Vote in Their Millions Despite Bombs

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posted on Jan, 29 2005 @ 11:17 PM
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The polls are open in Iraq. The voters are coming to the polls in the face of threats of violence by the insurgents. President Ghazi al-Yawer called it Iraq's first step "toward joining the free world." Violence erupted before the vote began included an attack on the U.S. Embassy and mortar fire. Al-Yaser opened the voting with his wife and departed the polling station with a small Iraqi flag.

 



Update: Defiant Iraqis Vote in Their Millions Despite Bombs


BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Some came on crutches, others walked for miles then struggled to read the ballot, but across most of Iraq millions turned out to vote Sunday, defying insurgent threats of a bloodbath.

Suicide bombs and mortars killed at least 35 people, but Iraqis still came out in force for the first multi-party poll in 50 years. While turnout was scant in some areas, such as the Sunni city of Samarra, elsewhere it exceeded expectations.

Many cheered with joy at their first chance to cast a free vote, while others shared chocolates with fellow voters.
Millions Vote


Update: Kurd's Turn Out In Large Numbers


IRAQI Kurds flocked to polling stations in northern Iraq for today's historic election, which they hope will herald a new era for their long-oppressed community.

Pina Mohammed brought her two children to cast her ballot.
"I want their future to be better than ours," she said outside the voting centre at Arbil's Rizkari school.

While many voters across Iraq were hesitant to venture outside after insurgents carried out attacks, this school in Arbil's Sidawa neighbourhood saw an early rush of voters.
Kurds



story.news.yahoo.com
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqis voted Sunday in their country's first free election in a half-century, defying threats of violence from insurgents determined to sabotage the balloting. As he cast his vote, President Ghazi al-Yawer called it Iraq's first step "toward joining the free world."

Before voting began, mortar fire boomed across Baghdad and the world awaited the results of an event that will echo from militant Islamic Web sites in the Mideast to the halls of the White House. Insurgents rocketed the U.S. Embassy in downtown Baghdad late Saturday, killing two Americans.

Al-Yawer was among the first to cast his ballot, voting alongside his wife at election headquarters in the heavily fortified Green Zone in central Baghdad. As poll workers watched, he marked two ballots and dropped them into boxes, and then walked away with an Iraqi flag given to him by a poll worker.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This is a historic vote by any stretch of the imagination. Iraqi's are having thier first true election in decades. It remains to be seen if any one slate garners a majority, or if U.S. endorsed candidates will win the day. No matter what the results, the fact that the polls are opened is a testimony to not only the coalition troops and thier countries, but more importantly to the Iraqi people themselves.


[edit on 7-2-2005 by Banshee]




posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 01:33 AM
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It's not surprise the topic on insurgent attacks has a ton of posts already, yet this is empty.

The only way for America to secure Iraq is to win the people over. There's no better way to take the fuel out of the insurgency than offering economic and social freedom. This is an idealogical war being fought in Iraq, and this election is a victory for America. I'd call it the beginning of the end of the insurgency.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 01:35 AM
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Yes it is kind of like an accident scene, you do not want to look but have too.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:35 AM
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Hey Fred,

How come your thread doesn't have a GIANT RED checkbox?
Had trouble finding it.


I'd like to congratulate the Iraqi people, for their bravery, and persistence.
It's a good beginning.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:38 AM
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Kurds are voting in large numbers in todays election and hope to make signifigant gains in the election:



IRAQI Kurds flocked to polling stations in northern Iraq for today's historic election, which they hope will herald a new era for their long-oppressed community.

Pina Mohammed brought her two children to cast her ballot.
"I want their future to be better than ours," she said outside the voting centre at Arbil's Rizkari school.

While many voters across Iraq were hesitant to venture outside after insurgents carried out attacks, this school in Arbil's Sidawa neighbourhood saw an early rush of voters.
Kurds



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:51 AM
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Im glad that the Iraqis are having a shot at Democracy but i fear that it will not change much in the Violent situation the US and UK find themselves.
Just because there will be an elected Government in place will not mean the insurgents will stop killing, in fact i can see the violence escalating in the weeks afterwards. Anyone who thinks that a democraticly(SP) elected government will result in a calming of attacks and that US troops will be back home before the end of the year is mistaken. Still plenty of work to do.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:54 AM
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The only reason many of the Iraqis are fighting is because they don't see the government as legitimate. They haven't seen progress.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:56 AM
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Janus, I have to agree with you there. When the election results are in, we will still have the same security sitiuation, the same insurgency etc. However it is a beginning and as such we should be able to move foreward. The fact that we have gotten this far, to this point is amazing enough. Despite the fear and threats,
for the Iraqi people.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 03:03 AM
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Originally posted by Disturbed Deliverer
The only reason many of the Iraqis are fighting is because they don't see the government as legitimate. They haven't seen progress.


I agree, but then again the Insurgents may not see this government as legit, but as a puppet of US foreign policy. The kind of people we are talking about don't see any government as legit.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 03:19 AM
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BASRA, Iraq (Reuters) - Bristling with guards, the polling station looks more like a fortress than a school, but Iraqis in this Shi'ite Muslim city say the clampdown ahead of Sunday's election day is reassuring.

"I think there will be good security," said Ruya al-Khalib, a 27-year-old woman who plans to vote and expects most of her friends to do the same.

Turnout in Basra, like the rest of southern Iraq (news - web sites) where Shi'ites, who make up about 60 percent of Iraq's population, are in the majority, is expected to be strong. But threats remain and local security forces are taking no chances.

Basra Votes




posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 06:32 AM
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ROFL

I just wonder if all the candiates are part of a secret satanic society
It's hilarious that anyone would consider these elections "valid" actually it's hilarious they would consider their own valid



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 08:36 AM
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Can anybody honestly consider this election as anything more than a public relations event? The voters don't even know who the candidates are.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 08:45 AM
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Originally posted by Frith
Can anybody honestly consider this election as anything more than a public relations event? The voters don't even know who the candidates are.


I wonder how many US or UK citizens can say that they know the platform and record of everyone they vote for in our elections?

Really, how many in our western democracys would walk across a war zone to vote? Surely not 70%. We never achieve those kind of turnouts. The Iraqi people deserve the big thumbs up, no matter what you think of how things got to the way they are.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by Ambient Sound
Really, how many in our western democracys would walk across a war zone to vote? Surely not 70%. We never achieve those kind of turnouts. The Iraqi people deserve the big thumbs up, no matter what you think of how things got to the way they are.


70%? Oh you mean the incredibly unverified percentage of registered voter turnout being claimed at this moment? You know that as of the beginning of January 2005, only around 60,000 or so Iraqis out of a possible 25 million had registered. I'm sure that number has raised a great deal, but honestly 70% turnout with a total registered voter percentage of only .25% a month ago doesn't make this vote seem legitimate either.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 09:02 AM
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Really, how many in our western democracys would walk across a war zone to vote? Surely not 70%. We never achieve those kind of turnouts. The Iraqi people deserve the big thumbs up, no matter what you think of how things got to the way they are.


Heck, even I would vote if someone put a gun to my head!



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 09:47 AM
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Oh, I see. A successful, or even a relatively calm election where even a portion of the Iraqi people actually make some decicions for themselves and show some national responsibility doesn't fit with your idealolgy driven predictions so your response is to say that it isn't true, and that it isn't happening.

Got it.

*heavy sigh* See, that is the problem with being on the side that predicts doom and gloom all the time. Anything good that happens ends up being bad for your political position...

[edit for spelling]

[edit on 30-1-2005 by Ambient Sound]



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by Indigo_Child

Really, how many in our western democracys would walk across a war zone to vote? Surely not 70%. We never achieve those kind of turnouts. The Iraqi people deserve the big thumbs up, no matter what you think of how things got to the way they are.


Heck, even I would vote if someone put a gun to my head!


What are you talking about??? Nobody's putting a gun to anyone's head telling them to vote! If anything it's the opposite. Zarqawi's group said they would behead people if they did vote, yet they voted anyway.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by Ambient Sound
Oh, I see. A successful, or even a relatively calm election where even a portion of the Iraqi people actually make some decicions for themselves and show some national responsibility doesn't fit with your idealolgy driven predictions so your response is to say that it isn't true, and that it isn't happening. [edit on 30-1-2005 by Ambient Sound]


LoL, but mate it isn't happening. Iraq is a completely war ravaged country, thanks to US and it is highly dangerous to be there at this point in time. The voter turnout is abysmal in a country where 25 million people live and is hardly representative of the nation. Most of them are Kurds apparently.

Further, the elections have been staged by the US government and the candidates have been chosen by their approval. And the government that is set-up will be subserviant to US interests.

And to finally top it off, the Iraqi people don't even know who the candidates are, they might as well draw pieces of paper out of a hat. Finally we have the American military breathing down these peoples necks and god knows how many have been ordered to vote.

Basically, these elections are pathetic, at least 100 times worse than the recent Ukranian elections and you would have to be brain dead to actually take them seriously. Let's face the music here. Iraq, the sovereign country, no longer exists. It is now ruled by Imperialist America. This is not the first step to a free Iraq. That's a very sad joke. The first step to a free Iraq is when the Americans are kicked out of Iraq.

[edit on 30-1-2005 by Indigo_Child]



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 10:38 AM
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You would prefer that Saddam was still in power then?



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by Ambient Sound
You would prefer that Saddam was still in power then?


I wouldn't prefer anyone. It's not my country. It's up to them who they elect or who they let come to power. I don't remember them asking for America to get rid of Saddam, do you?







 
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