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Why Has American Christianity Failed?

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posted on Feb, 11 2017 @ 04:01 AM
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a reply to: whereislogic

All you do is post JW videos over and over.

Nobody wants to watch JW b.s.

Sorry.




posted on Feb, 11 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: irenialilivenka
a reply to: whereislogic

No non JW Bible uses Jehovah in the New Testament and only a couple do for the Old.


originally posted by: whereislogic
The Divine Name King James Bible (DNKJB) uses the name "Jehovah" also in the Christian Greek Scriptures a.k.a. "the New Testament".

The DNKJB isn't the only one:

Recognized Bible translators have used God’s name in the Christian Greek Scriptures. Some of these translators did so long before the New World Translation was produced. These translators and their works include: A Literal Translation of the New Testament . . . From the Text of the Vatican Manuscript, by Herman Heinfetter (1863); The Emphatic Diaglott, by Benjamin Wilson (1864); The Epistles of Paul in Modern English, by George Barker Stevens (1898); St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, by W. G. Rutherford (1900); The New Testament Letters, by J.W.C. Wand, Bishop of London (1946). In addition, in a Spanish translation in the early 20th century, translator Pablo Besson used “Jehová” at Luke 2:15 and Jude 14, and nearly 100 footnotes in his translation suggest the divine name as a likely rendering. Long before those translations, Hebrew versions of the Christian Greek Scriptures from the 16th century onward used the Tetragrammaton in many passages. In the German language alone, at least 11 versions use “Jehovah” (or the transliteration of the Hebrew “Yahweh”) in the Christian Greek Scriptures, while four translators add the name in parentheses after “Lord.” More than 70 German translations use the divine name in footnotes or commentaries.

The divine name Jehovah in the Greek Scriptures (picture)
Picture above: God’s name at Acts 2:34 in The Emphatic Diaglott, by Benjamin Wilson (1864)

Bible translations in over one hundred different languages contain the divine name in the Christian Greek Scriptures. Many African, Native American, Asian, European, and Pacific-island languages use the divine name liberally. (See the list on pages 1742 and 1743.) The translators of these editions decided to use the divine name for reasons similar to those stated above.
...
[best check out those reasons in the link cause I skipped that]

Source: The Divine Name in the Christian Greek Scriptures

Hmmm, picture doesn't seem to work, I guess you'll just have to click the link above to see the picture.
edit on 11-2-2017 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2017 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: whereislogic

What about "I don't care about the JW Bible or religion escapes your attention?

I truly don't, nor do I trust you or believe a word you say.

Just being honest, nothing personal, you are just a stubborn (and factually incorrect most of the time) Christian.

One of millions, nothing new or surprising.



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