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North Korea Watch 2017

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posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
Great leader with more rhetoric.


North Korea warns of nuclear attack on U.S. at any sign of aggression
Trump: 'If China decides to help, that would be great. If not, we will solve the problem without them!'

"Our revolutionary strong army is keenly watching every move by enemy elements with our nuclear sight focused on the U.S. invasionary bases not only in South Korea and the Pacific operation theatre but also in the U.S. mainland," it said.


CBC link
edit on 11-4-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 08:03 PM
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Not that we already didn't know that the USS Carl Vison is heading to the Koreas in response to NK, But...

PRESIDENT TRUMP: We Are ‘Sending an Armada, Very Powerful’ Including Submarines to North Korea



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: Wookiep


Donald J. Trump‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump 13h13 hours ago

I explained to the President of China that a trade deal with the U.S. will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem!

Donald J. Trump‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump 13h13 hours ago

North Korea is looking for trouble. If China decides to help, that would be great. If not, we will solve the problem without them! U.S.A.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 08:31 PM
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S. Korea, China warn of strong response to N. Korea nuke, ICBM tests


SEOUL, April 10 (Yonhap) -- South Korea and China agreed on Monday to take strong new measures in line with U.N. resolutions if North Korea conducts new nuclear and missile tests, a Seoul official said.

The warning came after chief negotiators on the North's nuclear program from the two countries met in Seoul amid growing concerns that the North may carry out its sixth nuclear test and launch an intercontinental ballistic missile this month.
...
Seoul officials believe the North is ready to conduct another nuclear detonation at any time upon the final decision by its leadership. The country is presumed to be just a few tests away from completing its nuclear weapon program.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

What is North Korea technically in violation of when they conduct a nuke test?

Nothing?



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Their dear leader makes threats almost daily to use those nukes on the US, South Korea, etc.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: BlueAjah
a reply to: D8Tee

Their dear leader makes threats almost daily to use those nukes on the US, South Korea, etc.

Yes, I'm aware of the rhetoric, but are they in contravention of any international law by testing a nuclear device.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

Not just threats, he declared war against the US "for crossing the line" a few months ago. Actually it was his defense minister but same difference.

The US is their threat. Like all other repressive nations. Whip the people into a frenzy to attack the "Evil Satan".

That is a wrong viewpoint but the lie they are lead to believe.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

www.hk-lawyer.org...




North Korea, Nuclear Weapons, and International Law
There are two major geopolitical flashpoints in North-East Asia, both of them possessing significant legal dimensions. The first is the dispute between China and Japan concerning sovereignty over the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands. The other - and much more serious - problem is North Korea’s acquisition of nuclear weapons and its increasingly bellicose threats to use them against South Korea and possibly other States in the region.

North Korean Crisis

The news media, till very recently, carried almost daily reports of some new developments in the ‘North Korean crisis’, emphasising its political, diplomatic, and military dimensions. Such an emphasis is understandable given the enormity of the threat posed by the stance of the North Korean regime to the peace, stability, and many millions of lives in the region. The major practical responsibility for preventing a nuclear-armed catastrophe lies, after all, on the political and military leaderships of the States involved. The crisis does, however, possess a significant legal dimension which will condition the actions taken by most of the players in the unfolding drama.

North Korea - known officially as the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea - is a relic of the Cold War. Established as a communist dictatorship during occupation by the Soviet Red Army in 1948, North Korea invaded its southern neighbour in 1950. The invasion was repulsed by a United Nations military force after three years of warfare, in which more than 1.2 million people were killed. The fighting was interrupted by an armistice (ie, cease-fire) agreement between the belligerents.

No peace treaty has ever been concluded, and North Korea’s southern border remains the most heavily militarised frontier in the world.

Since at least the early 1990s, North Korea has been developing long-range missile technology capable of delivering nuclear warheads. The successfully-tested Nodong missile has a range of at least 1,000 kilometres; ie, far enough to reach South Korea, Japan, parts of the Russian Far East, and northern China.

In October 2006, North Korea conducted its first test of a nuclear weapon. A second test was conducted in May 2009. The Russian Defence Ministry estimated the latter explosion to be 15-20 times more powerful than the bomb which destroyed Hiroshima. Later the same year, North Korea announced that it possessed a stockpile of nuclear weapons. In January this year, North Korea declared its intention to conduct another nuclear test, and in the following month seismic activity consistent with such a test was detected within North Korea’s testing zone.

Even more ominously, on 11 March this year North Korea announced that the armistice agreement had been ‘invalidated’. As far as North Korea is concerned, therefore, hostilities in the Korean War may now be resumed.

North Korea’s stated justification for declaring the cease-fire agreement invalidated is a wave of economic and commercial sanctions imposed by the United Nations. These sanctions were directed against North Korea for continuing to develop a nuclear weapons and missile-delivery capability and for proliferating such weaponry to other parts of the world.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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US deploys THAAD missle defence, operatives that took out Bin Laden to NK



THE crack US Navy Seal team that took out Osama bin Laden is reportedly in training in South Korea, conducting “field training operations”, amid rising tension with North Korea. South Korean media claims the famed Seal Team 6 — which killed Osama bin Laden in May 2011 — is part of the Foal Eagle and Key Resolve exercise being carried out from March 7 to April 30 in South Korea. While US military would not confirm the reports, it said “ground, air, naval and special operations” are taking part in “several joint and combined field training operations” which involve up to 17,000 troops. The special operations teams are thought to also include the Army Rangers, Delta Force and Green Berets. The training commenced one day after US deployed its state of the art THAAD missile defence system to the region.



Even if they took out Jong-Un they'd have a bunch of the old guard ready to take his place. If they wiped all leadership out - power vacuum.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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a reply to: auroraaus



They will use old tech, which is so far under the radar no one will see it coming . If any missiles strike NK he then has a legal right to retaliate. He probably will. We think he's an idiot because we have been told he is. He went to school in Switzerland, enjoys all the western comforts, and intends to keep enjoying them, he is ruthless because he has got to be. Underestimating a foe is a great folly.
If you look a Poyang, it looks like a clean modern metropolis, in fact a really nice looking place. The gross domestic product of NK couldn't do that , so I assume he is getting backed, so its not only him that might be getting underestimated but also his backers.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: BlueAjah

What is North Korea technically in violation of when they conduct a nuke test?

Nothing?


Who-then-what-now, whaaaaaaa? (With a professor Farnsworth accent.)

Indeed: why should NK not be allowed to defend themselves?



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: Nothin


He's in violation of nothing . That's why I think it goes way deeper, its probably about China.



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: bryan2006

But is he actually violating any international law?



posted on Apr, 11 2017 @ 11:35 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

It always seems to be about something else.
Don't know if you are right about China, or not, but it is good to see that you are doing some critical thinking.



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 12:07 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: bryan2006

But is he actually violating any international law?


Maybe the Obama administration made a deal with North Korea to not develop Nukes, like they did with Syria to get rid of all Chemical weapons.



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: bryan2006

But is he actually violating any international law?


Maybe the Obama administration made a deal with North Korea to not develop Nukes, like they did with Syria to get rid of all Chemical weapons.
That was Iran.



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 05:28 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: bryan2006

But is he actually violating any international law?


Look at it this way...

What if there was someone who really hated you... say a neighbor. And they threatened to shoot you constantly. But you know they do not have a gun. Sooo... you try to ignore them but kind of keep an eye out and watch your back.

Then you find out that this person bought a gun... legally. And they are still threatening to shoot you. What would you do? Would you sit around waiting for them to shoot you. Or would you take action and contact the police?



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: BlueAjah

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: bryan2006

But is he actually violating any international law?


Look at it this way...

What if there was someone who really hated you... say a neighbor. And they threatened to shoot you constantly. But you know they do not have a gun. Sooo... you try to ignore them but kind of keep an eye out and watch your back.

Then you find out that this person bought a gun... legally. And they are still threatening to shoot you. What would you do? Would you sit around waiting for them to shoot you. Or would you take action and contact the police?

The question is if he is in actual violation of any international law.

I'm well aware of the poisonous rhetoric he spews, that is not in question.

I take it from the lack of responses here that the regime is not breaking any actual international law by pursuing it's nuclear ambitions.



posted on Apr, 12 2017 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

What if you're the one threatening to shoot because you know your neighbor doesn't have a gun to shoot back?.

...You find out the neighbor bought a gun and you quit being a dick and threatening to shoot them...

Situational dynamics such as the above are the reason a lot of countries aspire to possess nuclear weapons, to avoid being bullied by countries (neighbors) that have them.



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