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Mexican President postures, cancels Tuesday meeting with Trump

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posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: veracity
a reply to: bastion

That will hurt us as a nation first before its realized that Don has no credibility to be our president


His electoral win gave him all the credibility he requires to be President.




posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth

I think you mean the legal requirement. Credibility can wax and wane despite being legally fit.
edit on 27-1-2017 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 01:36 PM
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originally posted by: UKTruth

originally posted by: veracity
a reply to: bastion

That will hurt us as a nation first before its realized that Don has no credibility to be our president


His electoral win gave him all the credibility he requires to be President.


I do no think you understand the definition of the word "credibility".



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: UKTruth

originally posted by: bastion

originally posted by: Annee
Good. Hope he sticks with it.

Hope more stand up to Trump and refuse to play his game.


You'll be pleased to hear quite a lot of countries are currently trying to ban him from entry due to his hate speech and kinderegarten politics - no one takes him seriously apart from those who think he'll help them. There's been severall attempts to ban him from entering the UK due to his repeated breaches of the law and democracy.

originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: Bobaganoosh
I think we should send troops down there. We should arm the decent common folk. Help them wipe out the cartels and put their criminally collusive government in check.

It would make Mexico great again. We could help the good ones get control of their nation and destiny back.

It would be great.

We could build it together!

You want us to invade Mexico to wipe out the cartels? Isn't that the same as invading a country to wipe out terrorism? How is that going for us in Afghanistan and Iraq?


Preet much, however the Cartels are far more organised and dangerous than either of those countries so itd be an even more catastrophica faliure and loss of many thousand more US lives.


There has been no attempt to ban him from the UK.
There was a petition that got enough signatures to be discussed in Parliament and was quickly forgotten.
As it stands, the Prime Minister of the UK is currently in Washington trying to forge a relationship.


The UK isn't he only other country in the world, plus Davros is almost as bad as him and even she said she's more than happy to call him out on his idiotic policies.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 04:03 PM
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Sour Grapes




posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: bastion

originally posted by: UKTruth

originally posted by: bastion

originally posted by: Annee
Good. Hope he sticks with it.

Hope more stand up to Trump and refuse to play his game.


You'll be pleased to hear quite a lot of countries are currently trying to ban him from entry due to his hate speech and kinderegarten politics - no one takes him seriously apart from those who think he'll help them. There's been severall attempts to ban him from entering the UK due to his repeated breaches of the law and democracy.

originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: Bobaganoosh
I think we should send troops down there. We should arm the decent common folk. Help them wipe out the cartels and put their criminally collusive government in check.

It would make Mexico great again. We could help the good ones get control of their nation and destiny back.

It would be great.

We could build it together!

You want us to invade Mexico to wipe out the cartels? Isn't that the same as invading a country to wipe out terrorism? How is that going for us in Afghanistan and Iraq?


Preet much, however the Cartels are far more organised and dangerous than either of those countries so itd be an even more catastrophica faliure and loss of many thousand more US lives.


There has been no attempt to ban him from the UK.
There was a petition that got enough signatures to be discussed in Parliament and was quickly forgotten.
As it stands, the Prime Minister of the UK is currently in Washington trying to forge a relationship.


The UK isn't he only other country in the world, plus Davros is almost as bad as him and even she said she's more than happy to call him out on his idiotic policies.


May kissed the ring today.

Oh, and the Queen has invited Trump to the UK for an official state visit.
He's accepted - he will ride into town this year.

edit on 27/1/2017 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
Sour Grapes





They had an hr call this morning, no doubt Nieto back peddling like crazy.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: Indigo5

There was just so much wrong with that I couldn't even respond, thanks



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: Indigo5


Mexico's trade hole left by the USA will get filled quickly, by less geographically convenient players, but it will happen and then it will be very hard to roll back and US consumers will face long term price increases.

Yes, they'll fill those holes, with more expensive or lesser quality goods. So will we. But since we have more buying power, we'll be able to fill any holes much quicker and easier. We also have the land, the technology, and the economy (if Trump's philosophies are realized) to fill those needs on our own soil. If tomato prices rise (which they have been doing for over a year now, if you haven't noticed), people will start growing them here.

The dynamic is indeed that we are dependent on trade for the things we need. But that's the whole problem! Unless we produce something here, what do we use to buy stuff from others? We have to decrease our dependence on other countries in order to have a country.

We used to have an economy strong enough and independent enough to make us prosperous and strong. We were a net exporter. Just because that's changed, it does not mean it can't happen again. I for one want it to happen again, and according to the election I am far from alone.

We have a choice: we can fix what's wrong and return to our former glory, or we can buckle under to everyone else who wants to harm our economy by taking our avocados away (oh, the horror!). Last November, the country made their choice. They chose to try and reclaim their dignity and sovereignty. Apparently you chose to lie down and be a doormat. Too bad. Mexico will not control the US, and that's just something you'll have to live with.

Your superior economic knowledge over and above proven results notwithstanding.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: Indigo5
a reply to: TheRedneck

I know it is a big ask..But I promise it is informative and entertaining..

Watch this...Please...Its not political..then let me know thoughts.

I wouldn't ask if I didn't peg you as a thinker..

www.vice.com...



OK, I watched it... at least the first half concerning the crackdown on illegal labor in Alabama. And I see a little patch of dry ground over here, so I'm going to try for a mud-free post in here.

The situation is more complex than most make it out to be. There are truths in that video, mainly that the average Mexican worker can/will work much harder, better, and for less pay than the average American worker. A lot of labor-intensive farms now depend on immigrant labor to keep prices low.

But there are also untruths. The insinuation I saw was that Americans can't do the jobs. That is patently false. The difference between Americans and Mexicans is not physical... it is cultural.

When I was young, I worked mostly as temporary farm labor, as did my friends. We worked the exact same way the video portrays Mexicans as working: get there early, work hard and smart all day, go home when the sun went down. If you were a good worker, word got around and there was plenty of work. If not, you had trouble finding any. I remember farmers like the video showed... tough, weathered, gruff... and remember them saying similar things about us: "That boy just ain't got what it takes," or "I wish I could find twenty of him."

We did it. Americans did it. We could work those low-pay part-time jobs because we still lived with our parents and had nothing else to do.

So what has changed?
  • Labor laws, especially child labor laws have increased. While in many cases, including larger cities, these are important safeguards, in other cases they are actually harmful. We were all too young to work full-time, but we were old enough to work. Farm labor gave us something more important than money: the knowledge that we could accomplish something. We learned how to work together, how to get along with authority, how important money was. We built up strong muscles and a stronger heart. We got pride in ourselves and a little spending money to enjoy after we got home. And we learned that we wanted a better life someday. We appreciated the farm work, but we also appreciated that if we applied ourselves, we could make better money easier. Many of us went into college or skilled trades; almost everyone graduated school.

    I have picked cotton when I wasn't old enough to pull a full bag; my Dad would swap my bags out when they were too heavy for me and finish them up himself. I have hauled hay sun up to sundown, riding a cheap bicycle both ways, across a small mountain, to manhandle bales that weighed almost as much as I did. I mowed yards. I dug footers by hand. I hoed fields by hand. Today, that would be illegal, so farmers invested in equipment to take the place of labor... but that video shows that there are still jobs like those available.

  • Attitude toward work has changed. I remember friends coming by and saying, "Mr. Jones wants to know if you'll come help out with the hay tomorrow." My answer was almost always yes. It wasn't that I liked heaving those big bricks up in other a barn loft; it was that I would be able you get a Coke (well, Mountain Dew) or maybe replace those worn-out pedals on my bike. Work was considered a good thing, because we got things we wanted.

  • We felt that way because we didn't get things we wanted a lot any other way. I got presents at Christmas and my birthday, but a lot of that was clothes. I never went hungry while living with my parents, but I had to eat what was in season or on sale like they did. Hamburgers were a special treat, but we didn't eat them much at home... if I wanted to eat at McDonalds, I had to pay for it. If I worked, I had those things... if not, I did without them.

  • We had no competition from adults. I still marvel when I see a lawn service truck on the road. That used to be how kids found their way into the work force. It was a sort of lifeline for us. The pay sucked, but it was steady work during the summer. A few kids tied up 4 or 5 yards in the area, and made decent coin. If someone needed help mowing, they immediately started asking around to see if there were any kids available. The idea of adults mowing yards for a living was almost laughable because that was indicative of someone who had no ambition,

But today we have a different situation. Children are not allowed to work. Instead, their parents are required socially to provide for their every desire. Those who do not have parents who provide as well as others are shunned, despised, and bullied... and those who manage to find work are ridiculed and ostracized. Kids grow up without the incentive to work and thus never learn the value of work. Instead, they learn to play video games, watch TV, surf the internet, attend activities and socialize. When they finally are ready to enter the work force, they have no idea what to do, and thus end up in those kids' jobs because that's all they are capable of... and now, they don't have a roof over their heads and food in their bellies unless they pay for it.

Those minimum wage part-time jobs were never meant to be a career... they were entry-level, like when I worked for a while pumping gas. But today, they become careers because once in them, without support from family, one cannot afford to improve themselves. They have to pay for essentials, and have nothing left over for incentive. Life becomes a drudgery with no way to escape.

So now we have entitlements. The government will take the parents' place and make sure there's food and shelter for all. Except... old habits die hard. Adults who have never had to work and are used to fineries in life aren't satisfied. They want more, because more for less is all they have been taught. They don't want to work for their benefit; they want to have free time and nice things and be able to go out with friends on someone else's dime. They're searching for their childhood.

So the government sets limits... strict limits, required to prevent abuse. But these limits form a block to upward mobility. Work too hard, make a little too much money this month, and suddenly one has less because the benefits drop. That just reinforces that working doesn't equal success and causes people to finally give in to frustration. Now, by trying to save money by stopping abuse, that entitlement has become a lifetime trap.

Some even turn to crime... after all, the government can't track criminal activity, and the pay is awesome (until you get caught). If you band together (gangs), you get an even better return. Finally, it becomes an obligation for the youth of poor families stuck in that trap to join the gang. There's little choice; the public schools are now run by people who have grown up with their own entitlement mentality, and no longer care about the outcome of their days work... just the paycheck. No education means no hope, no work means no opportunity, and another generation is lost... the problem is worse.

That's the real problem.

Solution in next post...



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: Indigo5

Continued:

Illegal immigration is an enabler to this problem, only because it is illegal and therefore uncontrolled. There are still Americans willing and able to do those jobs, but they are few and far between today. If immigrant workers are controlled, there will be more incentive for farmers to try out Americans first. As it is, it's just simpler to let the Mexicans do the work, because of their (deserved) track record. We need to give this generation a chance to prove themselves worthy of the job.

Like most political programs, Alabama's 2011 law went too far in some areas and not far enough in others. We need that wall, but we need a door in it as well. We must enforce immigration laws for our own protection... not just economic, but cultural and physical as well. That does not equate to stopping Mexican farm labor; it actually will support it because legal workers have legal protection from abuse as well. It will require immigration reform, but only after enforcement happens. It is silly to fit a leak in the side of a bucket when the whole bottom is rusted out.

We also need to build the economy back up, so adults have the opportunity to move into adult careers. This involves cutting costly regulations and lowering taxes, especially for small- to mid-sized businesses. Entitlements need to be completely reformed, both to be discouraging to lifetime use and to be easier to get and more compassionate to those who are trying to get out of their trap. Child labor laws need to be revised; they can provide protection from abuse while still allowing kids to learn the valuable lessons my generation learned.

We can do it... but we have to do it to do it. Pie-in-the-sky got us here; it can't get us out.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck


A lot to unpack and appreciate the detailed response.

I don't have time today to respond to all of it, but will be back to you ASAP.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: Indigo5

Fair enough. I look forward to your reply.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth

Given May's plans announced today to sell the NHS to the US as part of her agreement with Trump, I highly doub't he'd be allowed in for safety concerns and massive public backlash.


www.independent.co.uk...

However in her defence she is considering severing ties with US alphabet agencies following Trumps comments on torture.




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