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How A Massive Solar Storm Could Wreck The Global Economy

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posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:03 PM
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This could be interesting if it actually took place.

Massive solar storm

Ok i know it most likely won't but, it 'is' backed up by Scientific data so, it's very possible, if not in my life time in someone else's.


Sure, the sun gives us all the energy and warmth that we need to exist, but that doesn’t mean it can’t also be a total jerk.

Case in point: A powerful release of particles and plasma known as a coronal mass ejection could wreak unimaginable havoc if it hits the planet, frying the electrical grid and leaving entire regions stuck in an indefinite blackout.

And depending on just where such a solar storm hit, a new study estimates it could cost nearly $50 billion in a single day. Solar storms of that magnitude are rare, but hardly unheard of.

A powerful storm known as the Carrington event would have cost the United States alone perhaps more than two trillion dollars if it had happened today instead of in 1859. The sun did even undergo just such a powerful coronal mass ejection in 2012, but it thankfully missed the Earth.




posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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It's not unlikely.
It has happened already.
Knocked out the power and cause all sorts of problems


en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

Thank you, secretly I want it to happen. The World needs a major reboot. That might sound morbid to some but our world has been pillaged and ruined. We need to go back to basics.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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I wouldn't be surprised if investor firms hire space weather scientists to hedge on the safe side of trading, since being on the wrong side of something like this would make many Gordon Gecko Wallstreet movies look like a piggy bank being broken.

With that said, you know they would also want to be on the winning side of a investment that took place during such an event.

Is there even insurance for such an event?

The mentioned above isn't even counting the normal commerce.
edit on 24-1-2017 by Tranceopticalinclined because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:37 PM
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The solar storm of 1859 (158 years ago) if happening today would wreck us, globally.

en.wikipedia.org...

For all we know there was a more powerful one just a hundred years prior- but we didn't have any bloody wires, so we wouldn't really have known.

Imagine every wire suddenly catching on fire.
Every car, every building, suddenly on fire.

No electronics work. Not motors, not generators. Not e-books, not digital watches.
No cell phones, walkie-talkies, outlets or ovens.
No electronic lights.




posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: Tranceopticalinclined
I wouldn't be surprised if investor firms hire space weather scientists to hedge on the safe side of trading, since being on the wrong side of something like this would make many Gordon Gecko Wallstreet movies look like a piggy bank being broken.

With that said, you know they would also want to be on the winning side of a investment that took place during such an event.

Is there even insurance for such an event?

The mentioned above isn't even counting the normal commerce.


No, there isn't any insurance. If such an event happened, we wouldn't have any digital currency, or records. There wouldn't be insurance, or insurance companies, or faxes or emails.

There'd be fire, and starving, desperate people roaming the outskirts of burning cities looking for anything they can take to survive another day.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: LuXTeN
This could be interesting if it actually took place.

Massive solar storm

Ok i know it most likely won't but, it 'is' backed up by Scientific data so, it's very possible, if not in my life time in someone else's.


Sure, the sun gives us all the energy and warmth that we need to exist, but that doesn’t mean it can’t also be a total jerk.

Case in point: A powerful release of particles and plasma known as a coronal mass ejection could wreak unimaginable havoc if it hits the planet, frying the electrical grid and leaving entire regions stuck in an indefinite blackout.

And depending on just where such a solar storm hit, a new study estimates it could cost nearly $50 billion in a single day. Solar storms of that magnitude are rare, but hardly unheard of.

A powerful storm known as the Carrington event would have cost the United States alone perhaps more than two trillion dollars if it had happened today instead of in 1859. The sun did even undergo just such a powerful coronal mass ejection in 2012, but it thankfully missed the Earth.




Read the book One Second After by William Forstchen. It is a story about how American society collapses after an electromagnetic pulse.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: LuXTeN

Could you fake it ?

say your TPTB



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

I'd much rather see that become a movie than these redone-redone-redone superhero movies, I think batman and spiderman both have been made 4 different times with sequels to boot for them all.

Why can't we have these very tantalizing tales become motion pictures? It's always the crap.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 10:39 PM
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originally posted by: Tranceopticalinclined
a reply to: Edumakated

I'd much rather see that become a movie than these redone-redone-redone superhero movies, I think batman and spiderman both have been made 4 different times with sequels to boot for them all.

Why can't we have these very tantalizing tales become motion pictures? It's always the crap.


Can't have the population thinking they might not be completely safe from reality- better to throw memberberries at them and keep them willfully ignorant of their reality.



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 01:52 AM
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originally posted by: kibric
a reply to: LuXTeN

Could you fake it ?

say your TPTB



Sure....

"Revolution" television series, watch it.....



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 02:13 AM
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originally posted by: lordcomac
The solar storm of 1859 (158 years ago) if happening today would wreck us, globally.

en.wikipedia.org...

For all we know there was a more powerful one just a hundred years prior- but we didn't have any bloody wires, so we wouldn't really have known.

Imagine every wire suddenly catching on fire.
Every car, every building, suddenly on fire.

No electronics work. Not motors, not generators. Not e-books, not digital watches.
No cell phones, walkie-talkies, outlets or ovens.
No electronic lights.


People would actually go out and socialise, play traditional games, do some useful work, and generally go about life like our ancestors did all these past centuries, instead of having their faces stuck to the screen of their devices.




posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 02:22 AM
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I've heard 3 out of 5 men are dicks

Should I believe it?

On ATS I think .... YES.

to you....



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 02:37 AM
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originally posted by: LuXTeN
a reply to: Macenroe82

Thank you, secretly I want it to happen. The World needs a major reboot. That might sound morbid to some but our world has been pillaged and ruined. We need to go back to basics.


Do you realize that people in the world that are at the brink of survival already would most likely die if something like this were to happen? You obviously have no idea what pillage and ruin would become, if we ever encountered such a catastrophe. You could very well become a victim yourself.



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 03:10 AM
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Always an interesting topic when it comes up. However, let's recap some of the good bits:

1) A CME is not an EMP. They are often confused by journalists and a couple of gorcrow doom groups who actually know better, but make book on lectures and books. There are very significant differences.

2) Not even all EMPs are the same. A high-altitude nuclear detonation (HAND, in the biz) causes a multitude of EMP phases, all different, which culminates in geo-magnetic heave, wherein the magnetosphere of the whole Earth bucks around, mostly under the immediate area of the blast and at the antipode. The first few phases, not detailed here, are 'prompt', and are mostly big blurts of RF, with the main power being below 30MHz.

This stage of an EMP is what's associated with
"Imagine every wire suddenly catching on fire.
Every car, every building, suddenly on fire.

No electronics work. Not motors, not generators. Not e-books, not digital watches.
No cell phones, walkie-talkies, outlets or ovens.
No electronic lights."

3) You don't get those phases with a CME. Not ever. That won't happen in a repeat of the Carrington Event.

4) What you DO get is the geomagnetic heave part, in spades. How that caused telegraph wires to burn during the Carrington Event is that they were long, continuous copper wires that stretched for miles. And they had crappy cotton insulation with very low punchthrough voltages, and which burns when an arc occurs. The 'burning wire' thing was the insulation after the arcs.

5) For current era electronics, the vulnerable bits will be long copper wires, again. The drop between your house and the local SLC, possibly. Mine's right at a mile at Chez Bedlam in Florida. Long low frequency antennas (you won't have to worry about that one). Or power distribution, but generally only long lines like interstate power transmission feeds.

What happens with them is, the induced voltage is too much for the common-mode rejection on phone lines, and it either shuts down, pops the protection devices, burns the line and/or wipes out the SLC. These can be replaced pretty easily, and it won't happen except in rural areas, most likely, because it's pretty rare to have long phone runs otherwise.

For power systems, the geomagnetic heave does a couple of things. One, it causes ground reference unbalances. The heave actually induces a potential difference in the grounds between the two ends of the power line. So you get common mode voltages or current flow, depending on how they wired the local system. This also isn't usually an issue, since the lines in a metro area aren't that long between transformers, so you don't get enough loop to really develop a lot of current.

For long HV transmission lines, you get something else that's bad, and that's pseudo-direct current induction. Between the disturbance in the ground, the counterpoise and the line itself, you can induce very low frequency AC into the line, since they're copper and long and don't have breaks. This pseudo-DC causes saturation in the high voltage transformers at the ends. HV power transformer design is a quirky thing and the design they use for cheapness (relative) and efficiency doesn't tolerate imposed DC flow. They saturate, do what we call "walking off the BH curve" and at that point the transformer suddenly quits looking like a transformer and starts acting a lot more like a short circuit.

At that point, dramatic explosions and fires occur, the reactor that might be feeding them scrams, you get turbine trips, and all manner of unpleasantry. Your diesel engines on site get a real life run test keeping the reactor cool, and then you do your best to shut that puppy down, because there just AREN'T any replacements. A long line transformer in the quarter million volt range and up costs about a dollar a volt, and has a six to eighteen month replacement time, because they're generally only made in Germany by one company and we don't tend to stock replacements at all.

There are ways to design so that this can't happen. It costs money to do that, so of course we don't. You can also prevent it by having the gubmint have the authority to force utilities to shut down long transmission lines and safe the transformers when a CME is on the way. That actually went around not long ago and a lot of people thought it was some massive conspiracy to control their power, but the deal is that a utility won't drop the lines because it's a huge money loss for them and they will try to burn the thing until the last second, and if they miss, then bammo.

But in summary, the main thing you'd experience is grid problems that would be temporary IF the power companies do their thing quick enough, and you'd lose a lot of satellites. Dish Network might be off line forever.

We have ways of mitigating the worst of that. I assume we'd use it. But you never know, it depends on the military and the prez.



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 05:00 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

SLC?



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 05:24 AM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery
a reply to: Bedlam

SLC?


If you've ever just gone driving about looking at the various phone things, you will see boxes about two feet tall and six inches square, those are generally punch blocks for individual houses or small groups of houses, as you move up the scale you will see boxes that look like post office mail slots without doors maybe four feet wide by five feet high, or alternately a cube several feet. At that point, you got T1, T2 etc or fiber (more likely) and maybe the DSL/ADSL/Uverse interfaces as well.

Generally speaking, at about the neighborhood level, you'll hit a subscriber loop circuit (slc) where the copper pair from your landline or Uverse meets a SLIC (Subscriber Line Interface Circuit). This is the end for the copper pair. At that point, your phone loop is digitized into T1 format and sent up fiber with all the other calls in the neighborhood until it hits a switch. There's all sorts of hierarchies of phone circuitry, though, and the ones they use depend on the company and population density of the area.



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 06:08 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I really appreciate your vast knowledge in these areas Bedlam. Thanks for your contribution here and other information you have shared with me in the past. Regardless of your occasional grumpy disposition, I've grown to respect you. Stars for you.



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: LuXTeN
I've heard 3 out of 5 men are dicks

Should I believe it?

On ATS I think .... YES.

to you....


Are or have?

Ruh-roh...



posted on Jan, 25 2017 @ 08:44 AM
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I think we should be looking at Nikola Tesla's coil that supposedly captures the sun's energy pulses/radiation from the ether. And, if it indeed works, then protect ourselves by building such devices as to capture any spikes.

www.apparentlyapparel.com...




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