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Pancreatic cancer spread fueled by epigenetic changes, NOT genetic mutations

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posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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Environmentally triggered epigenetic effects are inheritable changes that do NOT involve DNA mutations. Here we have evidence about the epigenetically fuelled spread of pancreatic cancer.



Spread of pancreatic cancer fueled by epigenetic changes

…Scientists running a genome-wide analysis of pancreatic tumor samples have…discovered that changes in the regulation of genes — not in DNA sequences — seem to be powering the cancer’s spread.

…People have simply assumed that metastases are caused by some sort of mutation. We set out to find if epigenetic changes could cause distant metastases, starting with pancreatic tumors.

We found there were large regions of the genome in the tumors that had lost the DNA methylation capability and also had lost what we call heterochromatin, the marks that make the genome squish together. They became sort of unlocked and available for genes to become active.

…We also identified a mechanism for these epigenetic changes, involving activation of genes that protect the cancer cell from oxidative stress. When we blocked that pathway, the epigenetic changes partially reversed and the tumors lost their invasive capacity — at least in the lab. This work opens a new avenue for discovering drugs to block or reverse metastasis.





posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

Are there examples of "environmental" triggers? I haven't read one yet. Just a whole bunch of mumbo jumbo.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: Skywatcher2011
a reply to: soficrow

Are there examples of "environmental" triggers? I haven't read one yet. Just a whole bunch of mumbo jumbo.


Hmm. Have to say it - you haven't been reading much then. ...Here's the primer: "Environmental" can refer to internal (as in cellular environment) or external (as in outside the body but affecting the body). "Environmental trigger" refers to any change, be it temperature, chemical, or otherwise. Temperature changes may be the most well-studied, as in "heat shock protein" research.

Beyond this, I don't have the time to educate anyone,do their research or summarize. The info is out there if you're actually interested.

Heat shock proteins in cancer

edit on 24/1/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

I think diet regulates a lot of our genetic function.

This doctor is researching the benefits of Sulfurophane (found in broccoli sprouts) on our genetic pathways.


Kinda interesting.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

…We also identified a mechanism for these epigenetic changes, involving activation of genes that protect the cancer cell from oxidative stress. When we blocked that pathway, the epigenetic changes partially reversed and the tumors lost their invasive capacity — at least in the lab. This work opens a new avenue for discovering drugs to block or reverse metastasis.

I often ask myself, what does progressive adaptation look like?

We live in an ever changing world. For life to survive, all living things have to change and adapt. Surely this takes place on microscopic levels over time. I am also sure that there are some poor adaptations or mutations that will develop during this process of nature building her prototypes. So is our interference a benefit or a hindrance?



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 12:04 PM
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Interesting. My mom died from Pancreatic Cancer.

Her doctor asked her if she drank alcohol a lot. As if it was a contributing factor.

She was alcoholic in her later years.



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Absolutely.

William Li pretty much proves that certain foods will stop cancer dead in its tracks.




edit on 24-1-2017 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 05:38 PM
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originally posted by: BELIEVERpriest
a reply to: soficrow

I think diet regulates a lot of our genetic function.

...


Me too.

S&



posted on Jan, 24 2017 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
a reply to: soficrow

…We also identified a mechanism for these epigenetic changes, involving activation of genes that protect the cancer cell from oxidative stress. When we blocked that pathway, the epigenetic changes partially reversed and the tumors lost their invasive capacity — at least in the lab. This work opens a new avenue for discovering drugs to block or reverse metastasis.

I often ask myself, what does progressive adaptation look like?

We live in an ever changing world. For life to survive, all living things have to change and adapt. Surely this takes place on microscopic levels over time. I am also sure that there are some poor adaptations or mutations that will develop during this process of nature building her prototypes. So is our interference a benefit or a hindrance?




"Progressive adaptation"??? ...Need to hear that in context!

The whole point of epigenetic adaptation is that it happens quickly - these all are rapid response mechanisms designed for rapid adaptation to sudden environmental changes. ...In the case of cancer, maybe not so good for us.




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