It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

ISIS Using Social Media to Integrate into Society? Has this Happened to You?

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 02:46 PM
link   
Greetings ATS, it's been a while.

Since hanging up my keyboard warrior armor in the closet and assuming a less-mentally-stressful life, I've not been online in a while. Life calls, and there isn't always time to delve into the conspiracies that hold our interest and provoke our inner activist. But, once awake, always awake - and once you're looking for all those key little things that don't match up in society, politics, and the social constructs around you, you can never really turn that inner eye off. So, here I am once again to indulge my overactive paranoia.

For the past couple of years, I haven't had my ear to the ground very much. I know very little about anything, but one thing I am good at is bloating my own paranoia and drumming up lots of speculative scenarios. So, here it is.

I don't know much about ISIS. I know that the refugee situation had a lot of conservatives and libertarians unwilling to take in survivors because of the threat of ISIS terrorism, and we've seen in Europe - especially France - that ISIS has kept to their promise of exploiting the refugee crisis in order to invade other countries. Whether or not these attacks were provoked by a higher power or fit the bill of a false flag is up for speculation. I don't know enough about the attacks to say one way or another.

I also know to be skeptical of anything that the mainstream media screams at you - and we all know how good they are at overhyping terrorism, gun violence, and racism. We always look for instigations in the media that might be designed to orchestrate a desired response from the public. So, naturally, I've been wary of everything I've been hearing. I've been avoiding alternative media as well, namely because of their obsessions with Donald Trump (seriously, doesn't anyone have anything better to talk about than Trump?).

Still, one can't ignore something suspicious when it pops up in front of them, can they? Not if they are proud of their absurd "conspiracy theorist" title.


Recently, my mother told me about a man on a dating site messaging her and asking if he could 'be her friend.' Usually I don't pay her speculations much mind, because they often include religious propaganda and demons and such. But this was something else. She said that the man who messaged her spoke in slightly broken English, but his profile wasn't empty and blank, which led her to believe it was legitimate. The man's profile picture was of an American in a military uniform. He also asked strangely invasive questions, "where do you work?" "Do you have children?" "Tell me everything about you." This was after almost no conversation between the two. She suggested that it was an ISIS member in disguise.

ISIS is using Social Media to Reach You

Any other time, I might blow off this speculation. I'm quite used to people grabbing at straws and looking for any reason to holler "conspiracy!" It's one of the reasons I'm rarely on this site anymore.

But this was hard to ignore, considering the same thing happened to me around the same time.



Same thing my mom experienced. Pictures of a white guy in military gear.

His weird English and strange requests are enough to raise a red flag, but looking at his profile raised even more questions. At first, I thought it was just some regular guy, so I added him as a friend. This person is on my friend's list but access to his account is very limited, and his facebook page shows no activity whatsoever apart from changing his profile pic and cover photo.





It screams suspicious, but maybe it's just someone looking to steal my identity online. That happens all the time.

Thing is, every time someone's tried to get information out of me online, it was always in broken English. This was years back, but still. It leads me to believe that ISIS could be involved. How likely is that? Who knows. But I wouldn't be a conspiracy theorist if I didn't consider the wildest possibilities. Truth is most assuredly stranger than fiction.

Me thinks ISIS might have perfected their social media skills. They used it to promote their ideals in the middle east, after all. If Liberals can get away with making facebook pages calling for the slow removal of the caucasian race from the planet, then ISIS can definitely get away with segregating individuals online and prodding them for information. I don't know what the purpose of this would be other than stealing an American's identity. Making friends so they appear less suspicious to society? Creating alibies? Looking for useful information about America? Hell if I know.

Has anything like this happened to you? What do you think this means?

I'd love to hear all your speculations. God, I've missed this.




posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:07 PM
link   
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

I'd like to know why I am so easily located simply by my own ip address...the service provider informs the location to the proper authorities? It's law if I understand correctly.

Why aren't the service providers providing the location(s) of isis to the proper authorities?
Aren't the proper authorities trying to locate them?




posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:14 PM
link   
a reply to: loveguy

Because for the most part, with just a little bit of research and practice you can learn how to spoof your IP address and basically make it look like your using a computer from an address other than your own.

It's just not that easy basically, because the IP from these posters, are normally a fake one or one from a computer they have infected with malware and have taken control of.

At the sametime, you can not have any skills once so ever and just use a proxy, which is a means to hide your IP address, but takes all the skill out of it and makes it as easy as entering in a url on a certain site and you're hidden.

There is also other means to use the internet without leaving a trace.
edit on 16-1-2017 by Tranceopticalinclined because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: loveguy
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

I'd like to know why I am so easily located simply by my own ip address...the service provider informs the location to the proper authorities? It's law if I understand correctly.

Why aren't the service providers providing the location(s) of isis to the proper authorities?
Aren't the proper authorities trying to locate them?



Good point...

Maybe they're side-stepping it and "letting it happen," much like 9/11. Our military's response should have put a stop to 9/11 at least before the second plane hit. Terrorism+reaction=government proposed solution.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Tranceopticalinclined


Also a fair point.

But they ought to be trying.

Again, I haven't had my ear to the ground. Are they trying?


edit on Xx11630331PM13 by XxNightAngelusxX because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:20 PM
link   
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

I'm not on any dating sites but, I have received those 'type' of friend requests via FB.

Similar to the above, different photo, no activity to show...I've rarely accepted or if I did it was brief and then unfriended immediately...their accounts usually disappear within a few days and we have no 'friends' in common or anything else for that matter.


I don't know what the purpose of this would be other than stealing an American's identity. Making friends so they appear less suspicious to society? Creating alibies? Looking for useful information about America? Hell if I know. Has anything like this happened to you? What do you think this means?

My daughters (young, hip and knowledgeable about the internet stuff) thought it was just the usual 'catfishing' type of situation when it happens to me and I tend to agree. I'm not sure what 'they' are after but, I don't believe any of it is genuine.

*A male friend of mine has similar happen often (of course he accepts every request sent, poor lonely one he is) and inevitable the women always wind up asking for money. They are usually in a foreign country.

I hope your Mother is very careful either way.

edit on 16-1-2017 by TNMockingbird because: * the mysterious disappearing sentence!



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:23 PM
link   
They sure seem to have their shills and trolls in chatrooms. I'm sure they have their hands in social media also. They are everywhere in western society, just look at the White House for ultimate proof.


edit on 16-1-2017 by Illumimasontruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 03:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: Tranceopticalinclined
a reply to: loveguy

Because for the most part, with just a little bit of research and practice you can learn how to spoof your IP address and basically make it look like your using a computer from an address other than your own.

It's just not that easy basically, because the IP from these posters, are normally a fake one or one from a computer they have infected with malware and have taken control of.

At the sametime, you can not have any skills once so ever and just use a proxy, which is a means to hide your IP address, but takes all the skill out of it and makes it as easy as entering in a url on a certain site and you're hidden.

There is also other means to use the internet without leaving a trace.

And I thought isis was a band of nomadic cavedwellers...where did they learn how to do it?



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 04:07 PM
link   
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

It's got more of a 'can you lend me $500?' than an Isis vibe, at first glance.
Try asking him some questions, see if he's trying to convert you. And tell him he's spelled 'Campbell' wrong.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 04:33 PM
link   
I have had this happen several times. Men wanting to be friends on facebook that I have no idea who they are. Always in their request is a picture of them in military uniform. Their names are common but have caused me some hesitation because both their first and last name could both be first names, an example, James Charles. Always these guys are overseas. Iraq or Afghanistan. I have not friended them and continue to wonder why be friends with me. They do not know me. My conspiracy thought followed a different path than yours. I am wondering if they are FBI or one of the other alphabets as I do get vocal sometimes.

I just checked Facebook and I have a new friend request a James Buckner says a Sergeant in US Army. OK this is weird. I went to this guys page and under the friends section, where the pictures and the names of his friends, there are pictures of 4 different people with my exact name! Spelled the same and everything. This gives me the creeps.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 04:39 PM
link   
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

I think it's safe to say that johnson cambelled is a fake name which should have been clear from the get go. The stock pics are obviously stock pics. The fellow in the pics looks familiar to me. Maybe a general. Not sure.

It is likely not ISIS but def a scam. Report it and change all of your passwords.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 04:54 PM
link   
a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

Yep, that is General Carter Ham.


edit on 16-1-2017 by Woodcarver because: (no reason given)


The leader of the african command during the Benghazi attack. He retired right after that.
edit on 16-1-2017 by Woodcarver because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 05:33 PM
link   
Most likely a Nigerian scammer. They target western women pretending to be military personnel and western men pretending to be models. Starts off as information gathering via convos then small requests for money transfers that become larger and more frequent



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 06:04 PM
link   
Not sure who they are, I've had a few over the past year myself.

Always military (full uniform), always overseas and always scripted "chats".

I spoke with one and he was basically trying to catfish into a VISA.

Claimed he was looking for a " a wife and mother for his son since his wife passed" but never acknowledged anything I sent to him telling him I was already married and couldn't be of assistance to what he was looking for.

Fake "chatting" to appear as if they were typing, then copy paste a standard "fishing conversation".

Scum.
Bottom feeding scum.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 06:39 PM
link   
Not that I know of, then again in the big announce threads during the big attacks last year, all the ones I followed had some many liberals in them defending the name of the likes of ISIS maybe it had.

edit on 16-1-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 12:17 AM
link   
A quick google image search finds that the photo he used is of General John Francis Campbell. You could look him up, but the photo's identity is moot. The person using it is a fake. I have had this happen quite a few times on FB. Some stranger, who in my case, has usually stolen the photo of a French male model or someone handsome, sends me an invite. Back when you could send a message with a friend invite, I would get some note telling me how beautiful I am and stuff pretty much like the note in the OP. When you go to their page and look, it's always a fairly new profile, with few friends, and all of them are women, mostly middle age.

I don't know what they hope to accomplish with this fake identity. And I have never fallen for the trap. If I get an invite from a stranger, I am suspicious right away if they don't have any common friends. In these cases, I always download the profile pic then upload it into an image search like google image or tineye, just to see, purely for my own amusement, whose picture they stole. Then I report them to FB. Usually within the day the profile is removed and a handful of middle aged and lonely women's dreams are dashed.

Tell your Mom to stop befriending strangers. This is how profiles get hacked and identities stolen.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 04:11 AM
link   
This is another common Nigerian scam. If you reverse look up most of the pictures, you'll find they are NOT pictures of the person but usually just a generic pic taken from the net or like this one a well known military guy. You can always tell the Nigerians by their remarkably memorable English
I used to get tons of this knobheads on FB had to close my account and open another



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:03 AM
link   
a reply to: 321equinox

You are right. That is gen cambell. He is also aware that his pics are used for romance scams.

www.washingtonpost.com...




top topics



 
7

log in

join