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What is happening at Ft. Hood? Another death!

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posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I tried to get to Bragg for 20 years (family within driving distance). Had to retire to make it happen. We got there, and three days later the wife says to me, "We're leavin'." Shortest tour ever.

I worked in the hospital. Lots of violent crime, both on and off the installation. And I mean a LOT.

ATM is not part of the local language. They say, "Stab and jab."




posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

if you get out of Fayetteville proper it's not so bad. Raeford is ok.

Eta: I don't think it was as bad in the early 80's, but that could be the memory goggles
edit on 16-1-2017 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: queenofswords

You need to remove any person from that list, who did not die on American soil. That would give you a better grasp of the scale of the anomaly. Including combat deaths is going to skew your statistical analysis.


Those were included, TrueBrit, because you have to wonder if they were specifically targeted. Supposedly, the attack took four months to plan. Afghans that come and go at Bagram are fully screened. There's no way they should have been able to pull this off.


Afghans who visit and work at its headquarters in Kabul are required to have full-body X-rays and biometric scans before entering.



The ones that were shot in Killeen and Indiana makes me wonder if they, too, were targeted specifically.

The ones that died of a mysterious illness on base is perplexing as well.

Two months. Twelve deaths. All based in Ft. Hood.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: queenofswords

Just putting this out there...


Indians' remains given dignified resting place
Story-Date: 02:06 a.m. PST Friday , September 18, 1998

------------------------------------------------------------

Indians' remains given dignified resting place


By ART CHAPMAN
Knight Ridder News Service

GATESVILLE, Texas -- On the northern reaches of Fort Hood, where
camouflage-painted trucks stir the Central Texas dust, a narrow gravel road
meanders off to a remote pasture that is studded with hundreds of charred
stumps from old prairie fires, budding new mesquites and protected by a
towering chain-link fence.

Behind the fence lies the Comanche National Indian Cemetery.

It is not a cemetery specifically for Comanches, nor is it administered by
the federal government. It is a repository of sorts, a place where the
displaced bones of American Indians can be returned to the ground with
dignity and reverence. It is a place for repatriation.

"We have about 105 repatriations," said Dortch Short, chairman of the
cemetery. "We have Comanche, Kiowa, Tonkawa and Coahuiltecan. We have some
Wichita and Caddo scheduled to come in soon."

Short has been associated with the cemetery for six years. It was
established in 1991 and is operated through an agreement among Fort Hood,
The American Indian Resource and Education Coalition and the Comanche Tribe
of Oklahoma.


Source



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: UberL33t
a reply to: queenofswords

Just putting this out there...


Indians' remains given dignified resting place
Story-Date: 02:06 a.m. PST Friday , September 18, 1998

------------------------------------------------------------

Indians' remains given dignified resting place


By ART CHAPMAN
Knight Ridder News Service

GATESVILLE, Texas -- On the northern reaches of Fort Hood, where
camouflage-painted trucks stir the Central Texas dust, a narrow gravel road
meanders off to a remote pasture that is studded with hundreds of charred
stumps from old prairie fires, budding new mesquites and protected by a
towering chain-link fence.

Behind the fence lies the Comanche National Indian Cemetery.

It is not a cemetery specifically for Comanches, nor is it administered by
the federal government. It is a repository of sorts, a place where the
displaced bones of American Indians can be returned to the ground with
dignity and reverence. It is a place for repatriation.

"We have about 105 repatriations," said Dortch Short, chairman of the
cemetery. "We have Comanche, Kiowa, Tonkawa and Coahuiltecan. We have some
Wichita and Caddo scheduled to come in soon."

Short has been associated with the cemetery for six years. It was
established in 1991 and is operated through an agreement among Fort Hood,
The American Indian Resource and Education Coalition and the Comanche Tribe
of Oklahoma.


Source


That is super interesting! Thank you for that information.

Ft. Hood has a resident archaeologist! That is truly fascinating. I read the entire article and also found this very thought-provoking (and sad):


There is one grave at the cemetery that contains the remains of 49
children. No one knows to what tribe they belonged. The cause of death
never was understood. It could have been a massacre or a sweeping illness.


Like I mentioned in my questions above, could it be some baaaadddd juju? Makes one think.



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