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Internet has become a dangerous place a war zone Pentagon said

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posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: galien8

That's why they need their buddies over at the NSA, and their command centers in Colorado for cyberwar.

They're out there every day trolling forums, taking names and building profiles on potential threats.

Looks like they're accepting applications:

www.arcyber.army.mil...

Not sure I'd want to move to Colorado.




posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Kettu


In a matter of speaking the world has become smaller and in question is our ability to deal with that.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Kettu


In a matter of speaking the world has become smaller and in question is our ability to deal with that.






They can just run XKeyscore and throw TAO on someone they want to target.

The trick is to identify the people to target in the first place. Mass data collection only works when you know who to focus on.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:42 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: galien8


So what internal threats?


What about the idea that organized crime could include rape?



good old fashion (pre internet) police work



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:03 PM
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Internet is full of lies. Government lies.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: galien8



Wow you actually believe that morality has something to do with machines.


I saw a cloud that look like mickey mouse once.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: makemap


A lie implies someone knows something you do not and is taking advantage of the situation. So what exactly is it you think the "Government" knows that you do not?



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: makemap


A lie implies someone knows something you do not and is taking advantage of the situation. So what exactly is it you think the "Government" knows that you do not?


Further,why do you think you are important to the, "government" that it needs to lie to you?







edit on 15-1-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:56 PM
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The machine that goes over all the internet traffic doesn't have the same kind of "morality" as a human being.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: Kettu


Due to government intervention in relation to vaccines humans live twice a long as otherwise.


Can you provide evidence of this "Machine" or in reality does your psychiatrist needs to up your meds?



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: makemap


A lie implies someone knows something you do not and is taking advantage of the situation. So what exactly is it you think the "Government" knows that you do not?






Maybe all the Faux news article we have today.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: makemap


So your saying the real problem is that white supremacists are starting to get together despite they are from different nations?


Actually I am not Caucasian.
edit on 15-1-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

I'm under no obligation to reveal sources



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: Kettu


Beware the furry little animals who stare at people.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Kettu


The problem is without sources



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 10:41 PM
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What Governments have done is create a system of measurement for something that really does not have one.

However it would have been really pathetic not to try.

edit on 15-1-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 11:55 PM
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a reply to: galien8

I'm taking a class on this very subject right now. It was kind of interesting, on the first day of class we all had to sign papers stating we wouldn't use what we were being taught to break into any systems (basically, just the school in CYA mode).

Still early in the semester so we haven't done much, other than to say I now understand the difference between 16 bit, 128 bit, and 256 bit AES and some of the difficulty involved in cracking it, as well as where it's vulnerable given enough computing resources.

From what I understand of quantum encryption (which isn't much, maybe that will change soon), the quantum part has to do with the key exchange. Since the act of reading the key changes the quantum state it's possible to prove the key is distributed without anyone reading it. From there, the key is used in more traditional systems where encryption is used, and presumably it becomes harder to reverse engineer the key than the message.

If that's the case, a quantum computer, once we have them, should still be able to decrypt a message if it's intercepted.

If you want something that's fully secure I think you have to go back to one time pads, with the cypher distributed using the principals behind a quantum key. That's a lot easier said than done though.

Anyways, on your point about encryption: If it ever falls away from freedom of speech, I'm standing by to defend it as part of a right to bear arms. More so than knives or firearms, encryption is the best defensive technology in the world today. It protects literally everything, and we have a right to it. The government tried to ban encryption before, and it would have been a disaster. If a bad guy occasionally has their message protected by encryption, it's a fair price for all the good guys out there with secure info too.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
Here's the problem with Quantum computers.

The cooling. Currently a Quantum CPU needs something like -200 degrees to keep itself running without burning up.

That sort of cooling just isn't available on the consumer market, or even the business market. At least not for an amount that makes it worth buying at the moment.

As far as security is concerned, it won't be any better or worse really. A quantum type of encryption can and will be broken by other quantum based software that hackers will no doubt create once the technology is available to the average consumer.

~Tenth


Sort of. My understanding on it (which again, is a bit limited) is that quantum computers aren't actually all that good at encryption. They're fantastic though at decryption. Basically, because a qubit exists in all possible states at once, an array of qubits exists in all possible permutations of a message at once. From here, permutations can be read which have interesting things said in them alongside the key that results in that message. Eventually, you find an interesting key, and can test it with more traditional systems to verify that it decrypts the document. It's a much faster system to break encryption.

However, no one is able to do that yet, short of a major secret military breakthrough. And, there are defenses against it, the defense is just a PITA to use because OTP's are pretty limited.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 12:12 AM
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Just go get and cluster a few hundred Raspberry Pi's together.

Boom, home super computer.

Anyway, cryptography is interesting. The problem is being compromised before the data is even encrypted. It doesn't do you any good if someone is already on your router or in your computer before you encrypt and transmit the data.

How does anyone know for 100% certainty that there aren't physical, hardware backdoors programmed into the very CPU and RAM on your mobo? I'm talking inside the cores or inside the RAM modules themselves.

Can any of us gather silicon, graphite, aluminum, plastics ect and make our own 14 or 30 nanometer processor?

Sure, we can trace our our circuit boards...but can anyone make a complete computer themselves from scratch? I'm not talking about plugging pieces together, I'm taking about from raw metals and materials.

If you don't want your data compromised, don't put it in a digital format. Vinyl was kind of hard to pirate. Tapes were easier. When music when digital, piracy exploded.

Data in a digital format opens itself up to all kinds of exploitation. Keep documents physical. Keep photos physical. Store things in physical format and not connected to the internet. Use radio, not cell phones.

Go full hipster and reject most technology. You'll be a lot harder to track, trace, profile and find. Why do you think it took so long to find Osama Bin Laden? One reason is that he used actual human couriers with hand written notes to relay messages, not phones or computers. Those we can track with ease.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: Kettu


Actually cell phones are radios...

electronics.howstuffworks.com...


With Osama ok there was the guy that knew where he would be in ten years so basically they waited and verified he was actually their and then killed him.

Cleary the US and Europe as well as the Australians, Canadian and the Japanese etc.... are having a problem declassifying their current decryption technology.

Oh well.



Music break...


edit on 16-1-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



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