It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mexico warns Trump on tariffs: We'll respond 'immediately'

page: 7
25
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 05:53 AM
link   
a reply to: Vector99

We are reading the same book, just on different chapters at the moment.

Tariffs can increase domestic production at a same or similar expense as outsourcing abroad IF and IF internal taxes are reduced to a realistic rate....which in itself if a tariff on our own goods.

I buy from a company that produces iron 5 ton ingots, they ship to China to produce say door hinges, they ship them back and I buy them cheaper....They must be shipped, rail or via truck...

Who is in the middle?

US Gov't all the way and that is who profits.

Tax on every single movement...

The US business are taxed to death. Tariffs will work.

mg




posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 05:56 AM
link   
a reply to: CranialSponge

But Canada can.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 05:57 AM
link   
I see another lie in the making. All this chaos will not encourage companies to do anything, especially in the rural areas. Laying the table to disappoint his followers about jobs. What will come first, layoffs? I am not sure how people will ride out layoffs at same time safety nets will not be there. Til Trump's gamble pays off, hopefully.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 05:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Your knowledge of it means everything, I didn't ask how much you make, I just asked a percentage.

Your top and bottom line are completely unrelated by the way.


Other than trying to distract for the fact that you clearly don't know the effects of tariffs on the economy or businesses it serves absolutely no purpose
so now you're against them again? Are you hillary Clinton? Flip Flop Flip Flop

I know exactly what tariffs are and their direct impact on business..

You know that grass is green.


I nver said I was for them....is there some reading comprehension issues going on here or what?

Yes, obviously because you said you were in TOTAL AGREEMENT with a post that recommended tariffs.


I didn't say I agree w trumps ideas on tariffs.

You again are having issues comprehending the conversation. Much like you seemed to do w phage and just about every single one of my posts.

This circle talk w you is futile



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: MOMof3
I see another lie in the making. All this chaos will not encourage companies to do anything, especially in the rural areas. Laying the table to disappoint his followers about jobs. What will come first, layoffs? I am not sure how people will ride out layoffs at same time safety nets will not be there. Til Trump's gamble pays off, hopefully.


People are riding out lay-off daily; has nothing to do with Trump

And dissapointment has been 8 years, glad to see you woke up

mg



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:05 AM
link   
a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Sure, backtrack now. My convo with Phage centered around the dollar rising, which it is. I was right there as well, and I actually provided sources to back it up.

You decide to hijack my thread and spout nonsense then change your mind after I used nothing but quotes of your words to discredit you.

I'm still waiting for that one post of yours that will be on topic, and not the illogical knee-jerking RINO's tend to do. That post doesn't exist. Fix your shlt.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:06 AM
link   
a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I will agree and to a point..Tariffs at a level.

I have agreed with your view as it is congruent with mine...I am just anti government because of taxes and that established the nation....everyone points "tea party". That is a reconstruct. I am not a tea party member and give them zero respect.

Taxation without representation...that was the 'tea party'

Not all tariffs are good. If the government starts there it will crush us.

mg



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:09 AM
link   

originally posted by: CranialSponge

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: CranialSponge

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: CranialSponge
a reply to: Vector99

Maybe I'll try this one more time:



So what about all of the domestic manufacturing industries that depend on imported materials to manufacture their goods ?


If I still get no response to my query from you, then I guess I'll have no choice but to let you go back to your infantile penis measuring contest with the other posters in this thread.


That I would assume would be broken down into stages, such as
A) Raw materials
B) Semi-raw materials
C) Completed materials

with different taxations on each level


I see.

So price increases to the consumer on domestically manufactured end products as well then ?

If everything is domestically manufactured, there wouldn't be an import tax/tariff to worry about right?



I'm talking about imported materials needed to domestically manufacture end products in the US.

The US cannot mine, grow, and/or produce absolutely everything it needs for various manufacturing industries.

That's why I said it would be on a materialistic basis.

If we import raw, unrefined steel to take to the mills, there shouldn't be a tax.

If we import refined steel to take to the mill there should be a small tax, because someone else refined it

If we import pre-fab steel buildings there should be a huge tax because someone else did all the work.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:13 AM
link   
a reply to: missed_gear

You must live in wrong state. All my family have jobs. It's the rural areas that don't have jobs. And they have had conservative representation for 25yrs.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:16 AM
link   
a reply to: missed_gear

Absolutely! We are on the same chapter honestly, and as much of an ass I think Trump is, I also think he understands business. People are quick to liken his ideas to the failure of trickle-down economics which was a huge failure due to unregulated practices. His proposal is sound, lower taxes overall and increase GDP.

Keep money and jobs here, and keep it affordable to do that, unlike that other "affordable" thing the last president gave us.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:22 AM
link   
a reply to: LuXTeN



But Canada can.


No it cannot.

There's not a 1st world country on the planet that can grow or mine all of the raw materials it needs for its domestic manufacturing industries to keep up with consumer demands.

So if you slap all of your imports with tariffs, how does that impact the selling price for the end user from those domestic manufacturers who have to import raw materials (or any other products) to keep up with their maufacturing needs ?

The US has a population of 330 million people, do you think your drywall manufacturers can keep up with consumer demands for sheets of drywall just from your raw lime and gypsum mining industries in the US ? Or do they need to import extra lime and gysum to keep up with US consumer demands ?

I'm just posing simple straight forward questions with regards to the impact tariffs can have.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:29 AM
link   
a reply to: CranialSponge

The majority of US consumables actually can be mined, refined, and manufactured right here in the good ol' USA. The biggest thing we have is our grain production. We are one of the world's largest food exporters.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: CranialSponge

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: CranialSponge

originally posted by: Vector99

originally posted by: CranialSponge
a reply to: Vector99

Maybe I'll try this one more time:



So what about all of the domestic manufacturing industries that depend on imported materials to manufacture their goods ?


If I still get no response to my query from you, then I guess I'll have no choice but to let you go back to your infantile penis measuring contest with the other posters in this thread.


That I would assume would be broken down into stages, such as
A) Raw materials
B) Semi-raw materials
C) Completed materials

with different taxations on each level


I see.

So price increases to the consumer on domestically manufactured end products as well then ?

If everything is domestically manufactured, there wouldn't be an import tax/tariff to worry about right?



I'm talking about imported materials needed to domestically manufacture end products in the US.

The US cannot mine, grow, and/or produce absolutely everything it needs for various manufacturing industries.

That's why I said it would be on a materialistic basis.

If we import raw, unrefined steel to take to the mills, there shouldn't be a tax.

If we import refined steel to take to the mill there should be a small tax, because someone else refined it

If we import pre-fab steel buildings there should be a huge tax because someone else did all the work.




So you're going to tariff some countries and not others ? Some trade products and not others ?

What do you think the WTO will have to say about said prejudicial trading practices ?

And what do you think your trade partners will have to say about tariffs on their imported products ? Will they reciprocate with tariffs on the products they import from you ? Or maybe they'll just find new trade partners to sell their goods to ?

Tariff wars perhaps ?



And since we live in the modern age of the internet shopping...

What do you think US consumers will do about higher priced goods ? Do you think they'll go on the internet and shop around outside the US to find the same product at a cheaper price with the added bonus of free shipping ?

Or do you think foreign companies won't take advantage of the new influx of US shoppers by offering them free shipping ?



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:38 AM
link   
a reply to: Vector99

Mexico is a hell hole because of US interventions and interdictions. If it weren't for the US, Mexico would have quite a strong economy. Like they once did, in the 50's



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:39 AM
link   
a reply to: CranialSponge

British Columbia and Alberta could do it.

Easily.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:45 AM
link   

originally posted by: LuXTeN
a reply to: CranialSponge

British Columbia and Alberta could do it.

Easily.


Can British Columbia and Alberta grow sugar ?

Bananas ?

Rubber from rubber trees ?



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 06:55 AM
link   
a reply to: CranialSponge

We need to stop looking for world approval on internal affairs. The US could EASILY be a net exporter globally if taxes and tariffs were set.



What do you think the WTO will have to say about said prejudicial trading practices ?

Probably the same they say about labor exploitation, nothing.


And what do you think your trade partners will have to say about tariffs on their imported products ? Will they reciprocate with tariffs on the products they import from you ? Or maybe they'll just find new trade partners to sell their goods to ?

The common go to, "they will sell to someone else". If there was someone else they would already be selling to them. US imports and exports make up a large portion of global trade, and definitely influence it overall.


What do you think US consumers will do about higher priced goods ?

I think if US consumers knew they could get the same pair of shoes made from the same company for pennies on the dollar they might be a bit miffed, the prices in the US are already extremely inflated.


What do you think US consumers will do about higher priced goods ? Do you think they'll go on the internet and shop around outside the US to find the same product at a cheaper price with the added bonus of free shipping ?

Meh, that's a controversial point but i'm not going to ignore it. That would be taxed too. It would also have to be written up in a staging manner, but yea, cheap imports would also have to pay that tax.

It's a focal point of manufacturing. The more of it you do, the more you can employ, and the more you make.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 07:04 AM
link   
a reply to: CranialSponge

er no, not yet. another fifty years perhaps when it becomes tropical.

But for now, they can produce most of what they need, more than all the other provinces of Canada. Remember the rumor that once went around about them seperating from Canada. They're just saying that they could. Quebec would kill Canada if they separated because they would still expect the tax payers to pay for their separation after they separated. That's BS. There are more resources in BC and Alberta alone to sustain them permanently.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 07:06 AM
link   
en.wikipedia.org...

What each Province produces in Canada.

Second Line.
edit on 15-1-2017 by LuXTeN because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 07:16 AM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I'm not too familiar with recent Mexico history, care to send me a source for this claim?




top topics



 
25
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join