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A Prion-like Protein Discovered in Bacteria

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posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 09:54 AM
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A pair of researchers at Harvard Medical School has found an instance of a bacterial protein that behaves like a prion when inserted into another type of bacteria. …

…They looked specifically at Rho, a part of a protein that plays a role in controlling gene activity.

…Cb-Rho functions as a protein-based element of inheritance in bacteria, suggesting that the emergence of prions predates the evolutionary split between eukaryotes and bacteria.



A Prion-like Protein Discovered in Bacteria

Got that?



the emergence of prions predates the evolutionary split between eukaryotes and bacteria.



Protein-based inheritance is real. So is DNA-based inheritance. It’s not either-or. Although is does look like protein-based inheritance predates DNA.

Thus, the story of evolution is getting even more interesting.





The research paper:
A bacterial global regulator forms a prion, Science (2017).
DOI: 10.1126/science.aai7776

Also on ATS:
DNA Dethroned - Inheritance is Protein-Based.




edit on 14/1/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 10:07 AM
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Super interesting topic! I will have to make time to read the paper to really 'get it'.



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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what worries me is this emergence of prions could provide a pathway for artificially evolved Humans created via genetic manipulation...

Hallowed are the Priors of the Ori...

edit on 14-1-2017 by ShadowChatter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: ShadowChatter

More likely methinks, that prions are messing with genetic manipulation and engineering.

Who knows where it's all going? Certainly not the tinkers; they're proceeding with inadequate data.



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Can someone please explain to me the significance of this statement, and what it means in layman's terms?

"Protein-based inheritance is real"



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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I totally get this, like I have zero questions but my friend is curious what exactly the ramifications of this are and how it relates to evolution. So if you guys are able to explain it, I will direct him to your explanation because he just won't listen to mine for some reason. He said thanks in advance.



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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How does a baby bird know that red berry is poisonous and not to eat it? How do animals retain knowledge of certain tasks that their predecessors figured out? How do people claim to have memories of those who lived before them?

More gets passed down than we are willing to accept yet. Memories and knowledge must get passed down, it makes sense when you think about survival of the species. The questions is how did nature figure out the best way to do it?

Is this what we call junk-DNA? Does it only appear to be junk because we haven't figured out what it does, but in actuality it's all information passed down. Now, it's also possible this data can get relayed through proteins... incredible!

In the end, regression through hypnosis may end up being nothing more than accessing past memories passed down to us through biology.



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Can you imagine how novel it would be to find a methodology of passing on inheritable traits without using genetic information?

I think this is the crux of that statement: inheritance without DNA using a novel method.



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: soficrow

Can someone please explain to me the significance of this statement, and what it means in layman's terms?

"Protein-based inheritance is real"


As bigfatfurrytexan says, "I think this is the crux of that statement: inheritance without DNA using a novel method."

A bit of history and context for you: Industrialists, geneticists and eugenicists want you and everyone to believe "It's all in your genes" [genes being DNA and RNA] - that bloodline is everything. That if you have a disease, it's because you have a "genetic susceptibility." That nature overrides nurture. That environmental contamination cannot affect how your genes work or what they do, or override your genetic code.

Bull crap.

Prion research shows that our environment (internal-micro and external-macro) can have HUGE effects, which can be inherited. This particular effort shows that prion-power emerged long, long ago.

Hope that helps.

edit on 14/1/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Awesome thanks Sofi and Texan.

As a related aside, for fascinating reads about Prions check out :

Fiction: The family that coudn't sleep by D.T. Max (really interesting book about prion diseases)

Non Fiction: Sleepless by Richard K. Morgan (based on ideas from the previous mention by one of the best modern writers I can possibly suggest)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: sputniksteve

Thanks sputniksteve.


And a quick reality check: How about sunscreen made by cyanobacteria?



PS. I know prions cause some horrific diseases but I think that's the exception (historically), not the rule. I personally got past the fear and panic about 10 years ago(?) and now am excited about the role prions play in adaptation and evolution.






edit on 15/1/17 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: ShadowChatter

More likely methinks, that prions are messing with genetic manipulation and engineering.

Who knows where it's all going? Certainly not the tinkers; they're proceeding with inadequate data.






When you say "inadequate data", what do you mean, that they have no real evidence?, that they are going forward with suspected hunches?, such as the statement that I enlarged/italisized/bolded below?

I just read the introduction to the paper and I wanted to express this thought ...




Prions are self-propagating protein aggregates, discovered in connection with the fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in mammals. Prions have also been identified in fungi, where they act as protein-based elements of inheritance. Although prions have been uncovered in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotic species, it is not known whether prions exist in bacteria.. Yuan and Hochschild report the identification of a bacterial protein—the transcription termination factor Rho from Clostridium botulinum— that exhibits the defining hallmarks of a prion-forming protein.



... since it is suggested we humans are a human/bacteria hybrid...

archive.wired.com...

...so, if we are to believe we are mostly made up of bacteria, then they have not yet been identified in bacteria, only fungi.
edit on 15-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Good questions. I was referring to the engineers "tinkering" with genetic manipulation etc - who are focussed solely on DNA without regard for prions and the roles they play in adaptation and evolution.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight



if we are to believe we are mostly made up of bacteria, then they have not yet been identified in bacteria, only fungi.


You're saying prions have not been identified in bacteria, right? ....Your (great!) article is from 2004. The OP article and research is 2017 - and definitely describes a prion in bacteria.


...Not sure what your point is...?



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

I guess they are using the terms "prion-like"..."exhibiting similarities" "behaves like", etc, but not identifying the prion as a prion.

As well, it seems they want to revise the meaning of a prion... it is all very odd.

phys.org...


edit on 15-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)

edit on 15-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Scientific rigour. It's a prion, just awaiting official designation.

PS. I posted a link to your article "People Are Human-Bacteria Hybrid" in 2005, here. You should check it out if you have time. Some interesting stuff in that post and thread.





posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: InTheLight

Scientific rigour. It's a prion, just awaiting official designation.

PS. I posted a link to your article "People Are Human-Bacteria Hybrid" in 2005, here. You should check it out if you have time. Some interesting stuff in that post and thread.









How is official designation decided?

Just to clarify, the text in quotes, that you say was from 2004 (and that I am great!), was actually from 2017 and from the source you offered in your opening post. I don't think I am great, however I do think I may be curious and want to understand all aspects of a study.




Although prions have been uncovered in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotic species, it is not known whether prions exist in bacteria.


science.sciencemag.org...
edit on 15-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Just caught your edit and link to the phys.org paper - which I posted about here last October.

There is no real controversy about the main definition for a prion- "a type of protein that can pass heritable traits from cell to cell by its structure instead of by DNA."

The revised meaning would include "intrinsically disordered proteins" - "Unlike canonical prions, which are noted for creating specific structures, these proteins contained large sections that are intrinsically disordered, meaning that those domains lack a fixed three-dimensional architecture." - but otherwise act like prions and have prion characteristics.


RE: "It is all very odd."
As I'm sure you know, definitions and directions in science are guarded jealously to protect status, reputations, book sales, patents, investments and etc. Simple changes - even a slightly revised definition - can have far reaching and often costly repercussions.

So no, it is not odd at all that academic and other competitors want to suppress scientific knowledge to protect their turf.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

Thanks for that, but I still have a nagging doubt about this as many traits/characteristics, behaviours of a prion seem to be missing. Anyway, thanks for a wonderful thread subject to get my brain moving.



posted on Jan, 15 2017 @ 09:30 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: InTheLight

Scientific rigour. It's a prion, just awaiting official designation.

PS. I posted a link to your article "People Are Human-Bacteria Hybrid" in 2005, here. You should check it out if you have time. Some interesting stuff in that post and thread.




...Just to clarify, the text in quotes, that you say was from 2004 (and that I am great!), was actually from 2017 and from the source you offered in your opening post.


I was referring to the 2004 article you linked here, and meant the article was great, not you.

...You referenced my OP link in your next post.



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