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F35-C Takeoff Problems - More Woes

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posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Pyle

The issue is that it's causing pain and disorientation to the pilot after they get off the deck. The bouncing is causing minor spinal compression, and it takes a few seconds for the display to catch up and stabilize.


Ah, I cant see beyond the pay/registration walls (at work) on the source so I have been going off best guess and past experience. I didnt even consider pilot related problems with new helmet. Those things have been a big development issue but should be worth it in the end.




posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 10:07 PM
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a reply to: Pyle

I had the same problem. I was thinking in terms of aircraft, not pilot. I keep forgetting that helmet.



posted on Jan, 13 2017 @ 01:44 AM
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After looking at those videos i'm amazed anybody volunteers as its just strap me into a rocket and fling me out of the ship....i'm amazed they can fly with with size of the balls needed for a catapult launch.

Someone should check their birth certificates as I think they have Spartan lineage



posted on Jan, 13 2017 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah, that's why I think they'll just put an increase on the maximum takeoff weight in place as a short term fix while they look at a longer term one.



posted on Jan, 13 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: Maxatoria
After looking at those videos i'm amazed anybody volunteers as its just strap me into a rocket and fling me out of the ship....i'm amazed they can fly with with size of the balls needed for a catapult launch.

Someone should check their birth certificates as I think they have Spartan lineage


I went on a theme park ride that was supposed to be like a carrier launch, I remember thinking how the hell could you fly a plane during or just after such a shock to your senses.

Do the pilots have to do anything, like pull back the stick or is it just a one way trip until clear of the ship?



posted on Jan, 13 2017 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: Forensick

They trim the aircraft slightly nose up. The F-18, they hold on to the grab handles, and don't touch the controls until they're airborne. The aircraft pitches up as they come off the deck.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:01 PM
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The Navy is planning to attempt a fix similar to what they did with the F-18 next week. When the catapult is first connected, there's a pullback mechanism that pulls back hard and compresses the strut. When the cat releases, the strut bounces.

The first fix they're going to attempt is to reduce the pressure of the pull back. When the F-18 was tested, they had a similar problem, caused by the pressure. They reduced the pressure, and the problem was reduced enough to resolve it.

news.usni.org...



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

This is what happens when really smart folks work to solve a problem. Huh...it begins to be solved.

New planes have teething problems.

For historical buffs check out the development problem with the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair during WWII. The Martin B-26 Marauder during the same era. Bugs happen.

As advanced as this aircraft is, with all its bells and whistles, it's had surprisingly few hiccups.

From my strictly laymans viewpoint, it seems a fairly straight forward bug to eradicate.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: seagull

The biggest issue has been getting the software to work with everything, and getting everything to play well together. They've had some non software related issues, but that's been the biggest hurdle.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

But it's solved, I'm guessing, since the plane is flying.

This attitude of some, obviously not you, that it's some form of turkey is, again obviously, wrong. Bugs occur. I think I'd be more surprised if they hadn't...'cause then they'd crop up at the absolute worst possible moment--going downtown, to coin a phrase.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: seagull

They're not there yet, but they're a lot closer than they were. They're still having problems with ALIS, and the current version only gives them basic weapons loads. They won't get the final version until something like 2019.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:07 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I've been meaning to ask what your opinion was on the status of ALIS. They have been awful quiet about it the last few years. IIRC it was giving them fits in the beginning correct?



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: Bfirez

It's still got some issues, but they're getting them under control. The biggest problem is still being able to access the classified side, but they have a new version coming out soon that should close that up.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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Tests were completed last week in New Jersey. It will take a couple months to analyze. They tried two changes during launch. The first was to change the way that the pilots strap into the seat. The second was to reduce the hold back pressure on the catapult.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Would I be correct in assuming that EMALS will alleviate some of the problems they are seeing with the steam cats? Its apparently much easier to tailor and fine tune to individual aircraft weights, characteristics and scenarios.



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

It's going to solve a lot of problems, yes. Right now it's more of a "aircraft weighing between 50,000 and 55,000 pounds get x amount of pressure" approach.
edit on 3/23/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2017 @ 10:09 PM
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Still interesting to me the minor changes that need to be made to make such an impact on the cat launch.



posted on Mar, 24 2017 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Exactly. Laws of physics: are you using your own aircraft's fuel, or the uranium powering the steam catapult?

Take the steam.



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