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Local businesses popping in and out of existence

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posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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I've been driving this same street to work every day and about a month ago out of the blue appeared a restaurant that I've never noticed before. I shrugged it off thinking I just never took notice of it before. It had large windows that you can look into and inside soft yellow lighting emanating from its chandeliers. It was always early in the morning and dark out at around 6am when I drove past the place and you can see that amazing glow. Now for the past few days I haven't been able to find this place! It looks like it was replaced by a service station for cars like jiffy lube as it had individual garages next to the business. That was never there before...




posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: genma

Try google street view. If it's not there, perhaps you are a victim of mind control, or worse yet, an Alien mind eating implant hell bent on making the Mandela effect a reality, one person at a time.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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Maybe you took a wrong turn somewhere?



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: genma

They may have folded because of lack of advertising/marketing, which I believe is one of the most important factors in funneling business one's way. They should have distributed flyers/coupons everywhere and anywhere when they first opened and if they did not offer unique fare then that may have played against them. Also, it seems cash flow is also the number one problem facing new businesses.

I notice the same thing, that small businesses come and go in the twinkling of an eye.


edit on 12-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: genma

Maybe if you'd stopped in they'd still be open.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Thanns for seeing thru the disguise, more Mandella gibberish.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 10:26 AM
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Lots of businesses start only to flop during a short time. I would say that the time lapse was longer than you think. You may not have noticed it till right before it closed, we usually do not notice things most times. When you focus on driving you do not see all the changes that have occurred. Your awareness is increasing. Usually a business lasts about a year or so. Mismanagement or just plain not doing a good job perspective is the cause of most failures.

The new jobs are counted in our new job creation by the government but not counted as job losses when they close. Many businesses that flop actually make our state of the economy look better this way.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 10:54 AM
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Lately, while driving, I notice house 'for sale' signs pop up and then 'sold' signs go up extremely quickly - within days to under two weeks. I only noticed because normally houses in my neighbourhood never sold that fast, and I've been living here for over 25+ years. So, I researched it a little further and my small-medium City real estate is in the beginning stages of a boom because the larger surrounding cities' house prices are now out of most people's purchasing grasp. Just look for tell-tale signs of a boom or depression, or where specific businesses will not survive, such as restaurants.
edit on 12-1-2017 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

I have seen a lot of businesses fail, some owned by friends of mine. It seems the biggest cause of failure is expansion, starting a second location. The owners life gets so stressed when they do that, they had it easy with one business and people talked them into starting a second location. It is hard on the heart and head.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 11:14 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Lots of businesses start only to flop during a short time. I would say that the time lapse was longer than you think. You may not have noticed it till right before it closed, we usually do not notice things most times. When you focus on driving you do not see all the changes that have occurred. Your awareness is increasing. Usually a business lasts about a year or so. Mismanagement or just plain not doing a good job perspective is the cause of most failures.

The new jobs are counted in our new job creation by the government but not counted as job losses when they close. Many businesses that flop actually make our state of the economy look better this way.

I do believe that is a pretty accurate assessment. One thing I have noticed is that sometimes people jump in to their American dream and will build out a posh establishment without the actual business mind to execute the rest of the business, particularly mid-scale restaurants and boutique clothing store's that my wife finds and then gets annoyed when they are closed in a short time span. I think it has a lot to do with people underestimating what the business will demand of them and the fact that a lot of people start doing this with very little business sense. I know in a few places the local small business organizations have free or low-cost business oriented classes or workshops and will sometimes even reach out to new business listings to try and help them thrive. After all, it is best for the community if a business can grow roots as most require extra employees and generate revenue. Some, unfortunately, due to lack of skills or not having researched their location, product, and demographics simply end up being unable to market themselves well enough to break even and eventually close shop.
My wife loves to find and support local artisans and independent clothing stores and non-chain restaurants so she is always giving me the rundown when a place has "disappeared". It is an unfortunate part of the business jungle. Some thrive other's not so much.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: InTheLight

I have seen a lot of businesses fail, some owned by friends of mine. It seems the biggest cause of failure is expansion, starting a second location. The owners life gets so stressed when they do that, they had it easy with one business and people talked them into starting a second location. It is hard on the heart and head.


I know because I delved into trying to start an online business years ago, but the advertising/marketing fees were just too expensive and it was a labour of love, where I would find myself waking up at 3:00 a.m. excited to work on my accounting books.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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Ok I just checked Google Earth and Street and there is no evidence of the restaurant that I remember being there the past month. It's been replaced by a car service station. There's no way the building/business could've went through an overhaul like that in a weekend. I saw no signs of construction at all leading up to the change. Curiouser and curiouser...



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: genma
I've been driving this same street to work every day and about a month ago out of the blue appeared a restaurant that I've never noticed before. I shrugged it off thinking I just never took notice of it before..


75% of all new startup businesses fail within the first 3 years of operation.

Hope springs eternal, new businesses take over the spots where the old business was, with new bank loans.

There's also a trend that I've noticed in my city. A large new condo building goes up in a neighborhood. And while it's being built, lots of neat small shops pop up all around the building. After the condo is finished, and all units sold out, the stores all vanish, and become empty store fronts, awaiting new tenants.

I've developed a theory of why this happens. The developer of the condo arranges special deals for all these small stores, to get them low cost leases, for the duration of the condo project. The stores move in, and the prospective buyers of the condo units visit the neighborhood, see all the nice small shops, and think, "this is a great place to live", so they buy the condo units. After the condo is all sold out, the shop leases expire, and the new leases are too high cost for the store owners, so they move elsewhere. So, the developers are creating artificial neighborhoods to help market and sell their units, but these neighborhoods are not self-sustaining. When the developer goes, so does the neighborhood.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: AMPTAH

That's all fine and dandy, I understand that but how can an establishment completely turn around like this in a weekend at maximum?. I don't drive the road for 2 days on Sat and Sun but that's it. The building was completely renovated in layout and business rebranded without any hint of it. No grand opening signs, no nothing.

Edit: And truthfully I don't remember what was there before this restaurant popped up a month ago. It all just seems so strange to me.


edit on 12-1-2017 by genma because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: genma

If it bothers you so much, why not go there for your next oil change and ask?



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: genma

If it bothers you so much, why not go there for your next oil change and ask?


Trust me, I'm very tempted. If you remember the LifeMatrix youtube channel that guy used to do it a lot before having a nervous breakdown where he deleted all of his videos.



posted on Jan, 12 2017 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: genma

You could always check municipal records - or are you hinting at Mandella Effect as some suspect?



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