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FBI Pays Geek Squad Techs To Snoop On Customer Computers-($500 for Pedo picture)

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posted on Jan, 10 2017 @ 02:23 PM
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On a windows operating system there are many items beyond the operating system time and dates which could date when this file appeared after editing the attributes. Beyond the basic file attributes there are many registry keys and also the NTFS file system to draw data from. To give an idea of what's possible...


it is the file system, the NTFS. Not the OS. A reg key created for a file because the file was copied to disk?




posted on Jan, 10 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: loveguy


Doesn't look menacing at all, feel safer?



posted on Jan, 10 2017 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: loveguy


Doesn't look menacing at all, feel safer?


What you meant to ask is do I feel protected?





posted on Jan, 10 2017 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: loveguy

Correct forced protection



posted on Jan, 11 2017 @ 03:16 PM
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The existence of the small cadre of informants within one of the country’s most popular computer repair services was revealed in the case of a California doctor who is facing federal charges after his hard drive was flagged by a technician. The doctor’s lawyers found that the FBI had cultivated eight “confidential human sources” in the Geek Squad over a four-year period, according to a judge’s order in the case, with all of them receiving some payment.

The case raises issues about privacy and the government use of informants. If a customer turns over their computer for repair, do they forfeit their expectation of privacy, and their Fourth Amendment protection from unreasonable searches? And if an informant is paid, does it compromise their credibility or effectively convert them into an agent of the government? www.twincities.com...


Just curious as to why this is in the Skunk works forum. I read the thread intro but since it was in the skunk works, I paid it little mind and skipped the responses. However, today while I was in town, I happened to be perusing the local newspaper and lo and behold, it was front and center in the business section. So when I got home, I did some searching and there it was in several valid newspapers. Here's another link:

www.chicagotribune.com...

And there are many more. The thread looks legit to me. So, what gives?

But whatever, maybe they should be called The Geek Squawk....... or Cheep Squawks, I don't know, something more 'fitting'.



posted on Jan, 11 2017 @ 03:54 PM
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In some states, computer technicians are required by law to report any suspected child pornography to the authorities. Utah being the latest state to pass such a law.



posted on Jan, 11 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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a reply to: Blarneystoner

Thanks for your response. But isn't the issue here that specific 'moles' are being paid to report, therefore, as quoted above, opening the possibility for influencing information? Like who's going to verify it wasn't planted for cash? Or is that the "skunk" part?

Also, I see in the paper the thought raised that if the Geek Squad is being paid for their informing to gov agencies, are they then an arm of the government, thus requiring a warrant or special consent needed?

I don't know, just wondering.


edit on 11-1-2017 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2017 @ 06:00 PM
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If you're stupid enough to hand over a computer full of illegal material to a third party for maintenance, then don't be surprised when the Feds come knocking on your door. Of course a Geek Squad tech is going to call in a tip if they find child porn on a customer's computer, just like anyone else would.



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