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The Solar System's Mysterious, Undiscovered Planet 9

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posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: Icarus Rising

It's funny in a queer kind of way that we learn about different star systems through our telescopes and what-not...
Little planets that rotate around their given stars...
Are we supposed to believe that while this thing seems to remain a mystery?




posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: Icarus Rising

it would be cool to see a new planet in our system.

#Make_Pluto_Great_Again




posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

I saw that... and as I said, I am still not convinced it has to be a body in orbit around our sun.

What I am saying is this guy believes. I think he said, "100%" belief there is something there. I think there might have been something in our distant past that explains a heck of a lot more than just elliptical orbits.

The plane of the solar system not being in line with the rest of the plane of the Milky Way has never been explained (as far as I know). A better, and several years older, explanation is the solar system was part of a dwarf galaxy that was consumed by the Milky Way. I would think that such an event would be disturbing to the solar system. I think of it like this, the solar system is like an LP record, a whole unit. It is spinning doing what galaxies doe, along comes the collision with the Milky Way, and the entire LP starts to wobble. Some stretching and maybe some warping happen too due to the MY's gravitational influence. I could be totally out in the weeds on such a belief but it makes more sense than a body out there we have not discovered.

The fact that our sun is influenced by Sirius might also play a role. A wandering star, brown dwarf, or black hole passing near by could also have set us a kilter. What they might have calculated is the path of such a body as it whooshed past. Again, no Planet 9 needed.



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
The fact that our sun is influenced by Sirius might also play a role.


How does a star 8.6 light-years away influence the sun?



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


The plane of the solar system not being in line with the rest of the plane of the Milky Way has never been explained (as far as I know).
Is there any reason the plane of the Solar System should be the same as the Galaxy?



The fact that our sun is influenced by Sirius might also play a role.
What makes you think the Sun is influenced by Sirius? In what way is it influenced?



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


I saw that... and as I said, I am still not convinced it has to be a body in orbit around our sun.


Well it doesn't have to be, it could be orbiting a brown dwarf that we can't see as well.


The plane of the solar system not being in line with the rest of the plane of the Milky Way has never been explained (as far as I know).


Yes it has, our Galaxy is being eaten by Andromeda, and that explains our titled nature, as far as I've read. But I don't think it needs to be in line with the rest of the galaxy either though. Weird # in space happens.


HE Earth and the entire Milky Way galaxy will eventually be SWALLOWED by our largest galactic neighbour, astronomers warned today. ... Our galaxy will first be eaten by two nearby dwarf galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, before being consumed by the Andromeda galaxy


www.express.co.uk...

It's a little more convoluted than that I would imagine, but I'm not a math type lol Now if that is true, then it's true that it could have happened in the past.

I see what you're saying. It's just as good a hypothesis as there being a 9th rocky thing on the edge of our back lawn spitting rocks at us from time to time. Although I don't think that Galaxy Behaviour and solar system behaviour are linked so closely in the sense that they always define each other.

I like the way you think.

~Tenth
edit on 1/9/2017 by tothetenthpower because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower




Well it doesn't have to be, it could be orbiting a brown dwarf that we can't see as well.

A nearby brown dwarf would have been revealed by the WISE mission. It found a lot of them.
en.wikipedia.org...



Yes it has, our Galaxy is being eaten by Andromeda,
No, it isn't. But in 4 billion years or so there will be a collision between the Milky Way and Andromeda.
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com...

edit on 1/9/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Phage


A more suitable candidate would be a star closer to the plane of the Solar System, or celestial equator. Sirius meets this criteria, at a declination of -17°. It is also the brightest star in the night sky, three times brighter than Alpha Centauri and twice as bright as the next brightest star Canopus. Sirius is also the 5th closest system of stars to our own [6]. More significant is the fact that The Sirius Research Group has been recording the position of Sirius for approximately 20 years now and has not recorded any measurable alteration in its location relative to the precession [7].

Imagine that you are holding hands with a friend, face to face. If you both began to spin around in a circle, your friend would appear to be stationary, while everything around them would appear to be spinning very rapidly. Your joined hands would be the focal point of the revolving motion. While the surrounding environment would not be spinning around, it would appear to be from you perspective.

www.viewzone.com - The Sun’s Astral Companion A model for the Sun-Sirius System.

So that is a basic explanation which I read in The Sirius Mystery as a “double-spiral” (I know, neither is exact science but just trying to illustrate how the solar system is influenced by the Sirius system). Yeah, Robert Temple’s book leaves a little to be desired science wise as does the website quoted but heck, this is ATS after all and look at the conversation started!

So, the Sirius quip by me was to show that there can be other explanations other than some unseen Planet 9 that going back to antiquity (even ancient alien hypothesis) besides Nemesis/Nibiru stuff is never really mentioned. I do not study cosmology but I do read voraciously any and all material I can get my hands on and have seen this several times. Lots of CT around Sirius out there and could not provide “real” science to you. But the argument is not to prove to a tee my statement but to provide some other reasons besides 60 Minutes’ story. Which I still do not believe.



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Oh well, thank you for that information Phage.

~Tenth



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
The Sun does not orbit Sirius.



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

That has nothing to do with orbital influence.



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Phage
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Yes, I know, the sun does not orbit Sirius. But this is about how Sirius influences the sun as we both orbit in the galaxy.

They trace a pattern of gravitational influence upon each other as we spiral around the galactic center. It is not a direct solar companion but it does have an influence upon the solar system. It is like a distant companion binary system not a side-by-side, hand-holing-hands binary system.

I would tend to think of it more as "earth is in the wake of Sirius' gravity like it is a distant binary system" than anything else. The argument being, the sun-Sirius influence traces a spiral as they orbit around the galactic center that looks like a double helix (that is how I was introduced to this idea and I said, "BS!" and started reading--then it started to make sense. Sorry not at home but would gladly quote what I have at hand as sources about this). The website previous quoted asks "what star seems to fit the sun's missing companion" question. They propose Sirius... and they are not the only one (but maybe another example of confirmation bias as well).

Again, this is just a counter point to the Planet 9 argument.


edit on 9-1-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: missing verbs



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
But this about how Sirius influences the sun as we both orbit in the galaxy.


Sirius does not influence the sun with its gravity in any perceptible way, it is too far away.

Plus it is not event that large being only twice the mass of the sun.




edit on 9-1-2017 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF




The website previous quoted asks "what star seems to fit the sun's missing companion" question.
What missing companion?

Sirius is very far away. There are four other systems closer.



Again, this is just a counter point to the Planet 9 argument.
Not a very good one, I'm afraid.



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Did you read the website cited above? If so, fair enough. If not... for shame!


It is just a thought that deserves to be brought out because it seems there is something about this that makes more sense than the moon causing the earth to wobble (which after all this time would have slowed the earth down).

It is also not the main point of my argument against Planet 9. Just a toss out there comment. And 4.4 light years is not that far away...

 


a reply to: Phage

Did YOU read the site cited? They start off saying most star systems have a companion and then ask which stars are suitable for the solar system? They throw out a couple and then explain why Sirius fits the bill for a distended companion.

edit on 9-1-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: add anoter response



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

I am not about to read a website that posits Sirius is influencing the sun's orbital dynamics when it is nearly 9 light years away and only twice the mass. It makes zero mathematical sense.

How does that website account for higher mass in closer systems? I bet it does not.

Oh, and Sirius already HAS a companion star with a mass nearly identical to the sun's.






edit on 9-1-2017 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Yeah. I read it. "Most" is not all, is it?
It is thought that about 43% of sunlike stars in our part of the Galaxy are alone, like the Sun is. There is no need to make up a "missing companion." arxiv.org...




They throw out a couple and then explain why Sirius fits the bill for a distended companion.
They throw some pretty basic physics out the window, as well. The fact that the proper motion of Sirius precludes any gravitational relationship to the Sun, for example. We are moving at far beyond escape velocity relative to each other.


edit on 1/9/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 04:03 PM
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9TH PLANET15,000 year orbit?

Nibiru I think is what 3600 according to Sitchin?

interesting



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Everything in the known universe influences all other bodies even over such vast distances as galaxies so what is the problem with looking at your local neighborhood and those interactions?

Sirius is NOT influencing the sun's orbital dynamics! I said it is tracing a pattern through space with the solar system. Not screwing up poor Pluto's orientation or keeping the moon tidally locked around earth (I'm not quite that stooped).

It is locked in step with the sun. How a star SO far away can do that is anybody's guess. And I said it was not "real" science. Just another example of stellar influences out there somehow have some interaction, from our perspective, that is unexplained and odd.

BTW, earth is travelling towards Vega. So, point Augustus and Phage! Mea culpa. If anything is influencing the solar system it is Vega (hehe).

Now explain how something so big as Planet Nein can exist with nobody ever having to take into account its influence on space exploration. Shouldn't something that huge screw up probes, satellites, and stationary stuff at Lagrange points? I mean, if we have elliptical orbits then nothing is safe.


edit on 9-1-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: mein grammar



posted on Jan, 9 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell
9TH PLANET15,000 year orbit?

Nibiru I think is what 3600 according to Sitchin?

interesting




Nibiru is also a complete fabrication...



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