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Light pollution or northern lights?

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posted on Jan, 5 2017 @ 12:40 AM
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Please move if this should be general chit chat, but I have an earth science question. We live in the boonies, about 48 degrees north, and we regularly see the northern sky glow. Not red and green very often, but about twice a week we see a pale glow.

There is a city of 100,000 about a 100 miles north, but could we see light pollution from that far? On the map at www.jshine.net... MAPour area is at least 30 miles from the closest blue light pollution area. Northern lights? Or just light pollution.




posted on Jan, 5 2017 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

Middle Earth must be leaking.

Northern Lights...

Nothing is what you think it is.


edit on 5-1-2017 by LuXTeN because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2017 @ 03:06 AM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

I saw a thread earlier saying to watch for the Northern lights earlier but can't find it.

This link shows them close to the northern midwest in the US right now. I'm gonna say lights. You should record it so we can see



posted on Jan, 5 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

In the summer months, the north glows turquoise blue every nite. It's always to bright to see the northern lights in the summer, unless they're right overhead.
They're nice on a clear winter night.

I live about 50 km away from a city south, and one to the north, I see a pinkish slight glow from the south, the place to the north is in a bit of a valley, I don't see it at all. Although it's spread out more sparsely so there would be less light pollution there 🤔
If you don't see the glow every night, maybe it is the auroras when you do see it

I'm about 54 degrees north.



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