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Irish scientists say we've got a new organ in our guts

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posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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www.chicagotribune.com...


In 1885, the English surgeon Frederick Treves gave a series of talks at the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Treves' most famous moment in abdominal history - treating Edward VII, a few days prior to the king's coronation, by draining an abscess in the royal appendix - would come decades later. But even by the late 19th century Treves was known among his peers as an expert of the guts. He spoke at length to his fellow doctors about the digestive tract, having examined it in a hundred or so cadavers.

The medical field was receptive to his findings. It remained so. As recently as 2008, textbooks like the 40th edition of "Gray's Anatomy" echoed descriptions that Treves presented in his lectures. But Treves' research contained an error that persisted for more than a century, wrote a pair of scientists in the Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology journal, published in November but spotted recently by the Independent: Treves neglected to give the mesentery, a double sheet of connective tissue that curls through the abdomen, the importance it deserved.




Treves declared that the mesentery existed only sporadically, in disjointed ribbons, dispersed among the intestines. That was not so, the researchers wrote in the new report. "The anatomic description that had been laid down over 100 years of anatomy was incorrect. This organ is far from fragmented and complex," said J. Calvin Coffey, a study author and surgeon at the University of Limerick, Ireland, in a statement. "It is simply one continuous structure."



Not sure if this is ground breaking or not. I would think if this organ had a vital function then it would have been found long ago? Any medical experts out there? I find it somewhat amazing how we are still discovering new things in a field that we are already pretty advanced in. Just goes to show we don't know everything yet.
edit on 4-1-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)

edit on 4-1-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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Not gonna claim Im a doctor but:

Doctors have always known about the mesentery, but it has now been classified as the 79th organ in the body


So, its only just been classified, case solved



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: thekaboose
Not gonna claim Im a doctor but:

Doctors have always known about the mesentery, but it has now been classified as the 79th organ in the body


So, its only just been classified, case solved


Interesting. This is new to me but then again I do not follow or keep up much with this type of science.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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I have a gut feeling that the mesentery has great intuitive potential if we learn to listen to it.
edit on 4-1-2017 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

Well, part of what defines an organ is having a vital function. Some of our now useless organs did have a vital function in our past. Maybe it's use is obsolete?

Anyway, i think it's interesting that they had a better idea about this organ back in Leonardo Da Vinci's day than modern science did until just recently. In fact, Da Vinci made an illustration regarding the contiguous mesentery.

contiguos mesentery



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 11:44 AM
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originally posted by: cooperton
I have a gut feeling that the mesentery has great intuitive potential if we learn to listen to it.


I see what you did there!



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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It's localized in Ireland, and hard to pin down because it only activates once per year (its a specialized liver specifically for digesting green ale).



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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The skin is classified as an organ too, am I right?

So would be the soul except theres no connectivity in some people.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
It's localized in Ireland, and hard to pin down because it only activates once per year (its a specialized liver specifically for digesting green ale).


Green ale?

thell you imbibing ? or does black appear green in blarney?



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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the mesentery, a double sheet of connective tissue that curls through the abdomen

connective tissue is NOT an organ



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

The skin is classified as an organ too, am I right?

So would be the soul except theres no connectivity in some people.



Yes I believe the skin is.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: savemebarry

Green 'beer' on St Patty's Day!

edit on 4-1-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 01:34 PM
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It's not exactly a part of the digestive process. It's not a vital organ in this way.

It's just a band of connective tissue that keeps the intestines from going willy-nilly.

You don't have to be a doctor; just take a couple A&P courses, or spend 15 seconds on google.


edit on 4-1-2017 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
I have a gut feeling that the mesentery has great intuitive potential if we learn to listen to it.


You jest, but i think you're correct.

It is, essentially, a fourth brain, albeit rudimentary.

Apparently, it does indeed account for the famous 'Gut feeling'.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:03 PM
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I call it my innerself when u speak to that area, sometimes it makes the hairs on my neck Stand up, when I connect. Or it could be a placebo, feels good all the same.
a reply to: cooperton



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

It does have a vital function, and that has been known for a long time. Connective tissue anchors the 30+ feet of small intestine so it doesn't get tangled or injured and provides blood to it as well.

What happened is, they classified it as an organ because it is not just strings of connective tissue, as has been taught, but an entire unit; a system of connective tissue..much like the largest organ system of the human body, the integumentary system that we call skin. It's not simply skin; it is an entire organ system of skin, glands, blood vessels, hair and nerve pathways.

The function is the same, and the tissue is the same. It just leveled up.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

I wouldn't say it leveled up so much as it's being recognized as the structurally necessary anchor points it is.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

Nice find lol



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker




Not sure if this is ground breaking or not. I would think if this organ had a vital function then it would have been found long ago? Any medical experts out there? I find it somewhat amazing how we are still discovering new things in a field that we are already pretty advanced in. Just goes to show we don't know everything yet.


They recently found a year or 2 ago how the lymphatic system connected to the brain proper. It was hiding along a vein going up the back of the skull. It was previously thought the lymphatic system did not go into the brain.
Some dye and a mouse helped scientist find it in humans.




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