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whoopee Theirs no law compelling you to pay the IRS income tax.

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posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 02:56 AM
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Well this was an interesting one, apparently when the federal reserve act was passed in 1913, they also passed the income tax act. But their were not enough States to ratify it. Which in practical terms makes the garnishing of your tax dollar illegal. At the end of this video two people who worked for the IRS looked for the law they were operating under, as they could find no such law, they realised they were operating illegally, and resigned. Then subsequently never bothered to file another tax return. www.youtube.com...




posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:00 AM
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a reply to: anonentity
I'm not an expert in the American Constitution, but do acts of Congress really need to be ratified by a number of states? I thought that was only with reference to amendments to the Constitution itself.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:06 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

Don't even try it. Even if it's technically correct, you don't need the hassle of the government on your back.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:15 AM
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Fun tax law fact. If you buy a new car with cash and request a merchant statement of origin (as opposed to a certificate of title), you do not need to get a lisence plate. Technically. You will still get pulled over and have to argue in court why you are right. Not meaning to thread drift here but some things aren't worth it and that's why the status quo is. Most people don't have the time patience or money to argue. Oh snap what if this is why Donald doesn't pay taxes... because he can afford to say no.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:25 AM
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This is true. I checked the books. F÷CK THEM! Come on liberals and conservatives let us revolt together! Screw Majors fun money! Life may be harder temporarily but, we have the resources and ingenuity to get through it!



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: Sillyosaurus

The Donald doesn't pay income tax (as many rich people don't) because of the laws in place. And they can afford good accountants. You start a foundation or trust, then "transfer" your belongings to it. You can transfer your stuff (on paper) to someone under 18 and about 1000 other ways around it. There are books you can buy that tell you how to do all this stuff, and it is legal.

I had an accountant many years ago, who had worked at the IRS. When I did my taxes myself, I owed about $1500 to the gubment. Brought my info to him, and he turned the table and I got $1400 back!!
edit on 4-1-2017 by BadBoYeed because: ...



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 03:52 AM
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Sounds like you had an unususial aw3some accountant. Fact is this vast majority are b3an counting stooges.reply to: BadBoYeed

Mind the spelling errors 8m on mobile cause my main was hacked and destroyed. The more truth you speak the quicker you're taken down.
edit on 4-1-2017 by AtheAlmightyOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 04:53 AM
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My cousin was looking to move to America ten years ago, or there about. He has relations in Ohio, so he checked out all local laws on buying a house or land.

It was when he found information on the IRS and that it wasn't law to pay taxes. After which he told his relatives about it, they didn't believe him at first.....it's crazy that this is not widely known.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 05:23 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: anonentity
I'm not an expert in the American Constitution, but do acts of Congress really need to be ratified by a number of states? I thought that was only with reference to amendments to the Constitution itself.



Correct. This reeks of another "Sovereign Citizen" scam.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 05:27 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

In this situation, it is best to rely not on what is legal, but on what is set in precedent.

People go to jail for failure to pay certain taxes. Ergo, legal or not, failure to pay them is still going to land you in trouble of a sort and scale that you do not want to be in.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 06:08 AM
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originally posted by: DJW001

originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: anonentity
I'm not an expert in the American Constitution, but do acts of Congress really need to be ratified by a number of states? I thought that was only with reference to amendments to the Constitution itself.



Correct. This reeks of another "Sovereign Citizen" scam.


I expect someone will mention maritime law any second now.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 06:37 AM
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originally posted by: DJW001

originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: anonentity
I'm not an expert in the American Constitution, but do acts of Congress really need to be ratified by a number of states? I thought that was only with reference to amendments to the Constitution itself.



Correct. This reeks of another "Sovereign Citizen" scam.


It's also wrong the 16th amendment allows for taxes. And it was ratified in 1913 with 2 3rd's majority. Prior to this they could not enforce an income tax but we're required to raise money through tariffs. With one exception being Lincoln who did levy a 10 year tax.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 06:43 AM
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originally posted by: ScepticScot
I expect someone will mention maritime law any second now.


Well, funny you should mention that. I understand that if you are in international waters you owe all tax to Neptune himself. This is why ships sink - unpaid taxes.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: paraphi

originally posted by: ScepticScot
I expect someone will mention maritime law any second now.


Well, funny you should mention that. I understand that if you are in international waters you owe all tax to Neptune himself. This is why ships sink - unpaid taxes.


I refuse to accept the tax jurisdiction of that johnny come lately Neptune.

It posiedion or no-one for me.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

You run with that and see how it works out for you.


edit on 4-1-2017 by SlapMonkey because: I removed a line that wasn't worth having in there.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 08:39 AM
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This is what I followed down the rabbit hole and eventually brought me to ATS.

Aaron Russo's documentary Freedom to Fascism, a plethora of YouTube videos and websites taught me that indeed there is something to these claims. Unfortunately the freeman movement have mucked up the waters.

Jordan Maxwell used to be compelling when discussing this issue but later started talking about his 'alien contacts' which really damaged is credibility with me. His take on Capitis Dominutio Maximus is food for thought but he really stretched things with his maritime laws and play on words. Excluding his claims of alien contact, much of what he says otherwise I'm not sure can be completely dismissed but should be taken with a grain of salt.

Still, I wouldn't dare attempt to put any of these tax claims into practice. The risk to an individual is too great to chance. Some people do get away with it and/or get away with it for a time, but most will not as the long arm of the 'law' will certainly reach out and make an example of you.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

I tell you what. YOU go ahead and take you tax advise from youtube and get back to us about how this all works out for you.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

Here you go, even if it's from Wiki:

Belief about the law as a defense in criminal cases

See also: Cheek v. United States

In criminal cases, the law distinguishes between beliefs about constitutionality of the tax law from other beliefs about the tax law:

A defendant's good-faith belief that he is not required to file a tax return is a valid defense to the element of willfulness, and the belief need not be reasonable if actually held in good faith. It is not, however, within the prerogative of the taxpayer to make a personalized finding of constitutionality. Thus, a good-faith belief that the tax laws are unconstitutional does not constitute a good-faith defense.


So, the point here is that you can have all the belief in the world that you don't have to pay taxes, but if you find yourself standing in court because of that decision, belief is not a defense that will keep you out of jail.



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Yup, why lose your entire life's work to save 5-6000$ tax bill? Just pay the tax, go to work, carry on... I will never understand why some people work their butt off, and some will put in 100 hours to get out of working 40.....



posted on Jan, 4 2017 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: Natas0114

As an avid procrastinator, procrastination is an art. I can understand the mentality. Though I wouldn't attempt something silly like this.
edit on 4-1-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



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