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So who has their amateur radio license?

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posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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With the popularity of the "prepper" movement and the flood of low cost radios from China, more and more people are getting them for their preps and also for the fun of it hobby wise. Who all here has taken the test?

I got my technicians license about 2 years ago, which allows me full use of the 2 meter and 70cm bands and some limited use in the lower freq bands. 2meter and 70cm are the bands most used for local comms among amateur use and first responders. Even without a licence, you can still listen in to all of these which is a plus in and of itself, you just can transmit.

I encourage everyone to check it out as the test is really not that hard and there are plenty of free study guides and practice exams online. Once you acquire a licence, it is good for 10 years. I believe the cost was a low 15 dollars. As far as a cheap handheld to get you started, the "Baofeng" brand can get you started for around 25 bucks if you want to just get your feet wet. All in all, just learning about radio during the process was well worth it.

The people I have met on the airways using repeaters (another neat thing to learn) are a great bunch, who are more than willing to help newcommers.
So who has their ticket?




posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I do not.


but this is one of my goals in the coming few years. does it take long to get licensed? how much does the necessary equipment usually run?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: annoyedpharmacist
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I do not.


but this is one of my goals in the coming few years. does it take long to get licensed? how much does the necessary equipment usually run?


I had my license in 6th grade. It would probably take you a month or two to study up and then you just schedule a test.
I forget if you still need to learn morse code anymore. We had to but it's been a long time since then.
I let my license expire actually.

I talked with people as far away as argentina one time. And talked with astronauts.. We even did some camping trip like festival thing where we tried getting in contact with as many unique call signs as possible. Someone even helped us set up a Cable antenna using a bow and arrow to put our antenna up in the tree.. Then we were catching everything .
edit on 2-1-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: Reverbs

You no longer need the Morse at all.

KD5TGN here, General Class.

Still working on getting my 20 meter rig on air!

73,



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: annoyedpharmacist
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I do not.


but this is one of my goals in the coming few years. does it take long to get licensed? how much does the necessary equipment usually run?


I just got a cheapy handheld for 25-30 bucks. A better antenna if you want to get further out can ither be made or bought. Lots of videos on how to build them, a hobby itself within the hobby. Licence was 15 dollars. You can search online for places in your area that hold the test. As far as studying, eham.net and a ton of others offer guides and test exams.

I usually just use the stock antenna if I am riding around, it works fine when using repeaters in your area. As far as how long it takes, that is up to each person really. I studied the material for about a month just to be absolutely sure and took a bunch of practice exams online. Once I took the real deal I only missed 1 question. It is 35 questions, multiple choice.
edit on 2-1-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:55 AM
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I do not- but it's funny... I decided just a few hours ago that I'm buying some equipment this year to have on hand. Maybe later in the year I'll decide to get licensed, too.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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w5ac.tamu.edu...

hamstudy.org...

There are many more.

Also.. During your search it will be recommended to buy the study book. I did not, it is not needed. It is probably nice to have but all the curriculum can be found free online.
edit on 2-1-2017 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: LetsGoViking
a reply to: Reverbs

You no longer need the Morse at all.

KD5TGN here, General Class.

Still working on getting my 20 meter rig on air!

73,


Nice! And yes that is correct, no more morse code, which really makes it much easier. I know a lot of old timers squable with the newer bunch over that.
If I can get around to affording a radio capable of those freqs then I might consider getting my general. 73



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: LetsGoViking

that's what I thought.

as far as disasters and emergencies go..

Well if my radio teacher wasn't there with the radio we would have had no idea what was going on or whatever.. But we were at this camp ground some field trip.. We had just gotten in the pool and then severe storm warning. We had enough time to get from the pool to this screened in porch like building. by the time we had gotten there backpacks were already being thrown around outside. the clouds were racing across the sky and it got dark..

Well me and the radio teacher knew what was happening and that there was a tornado spotted and where that was in relation to us.

So I felt pretty special having the info about the tornado and that we were not in it's path.. Well we were close enough damn but the worst was over.. Half the class was crying because imagine one of the walls was screens... and it's raining in sheets straight sideways from the crazy wind. Was pretty nutty, but yea the radio actually came in handy, and in a more prolonged event you can call for help, you can find out if someone is coming through with water bottles or whatever..

Oh and it's a way of broadcasting information without the use of the internet...
hehe

heck I think I just inspired myself to get my technicians level license back.

and even though I passed the morse no problem back then I'm glad I wouldn't have to re-learn that again..
edit on 2-1-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Reverbs

originally posted by: annoyedpharmacist
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I do not.


but this is one of my goals in the coming few years. does it take long to get licensed? how much does the necessary equipment usually run?


I had my license in 6th grade. It would probably take you a month or two to study up and then you just schedule a test.
I forget if you still need to learn morse code anymore. We had to but it's been a long time since then.
I let my license expire actually.

I talked with people as far away as argentina one time. And talked with astronauts.. We even did some camping trip like festival thing where we tried getting in contact with as many unique call signs as possible. Someone even helped us set up a Cable antenna using a bow and arrow to put our antenna up in the tree.. Then we were catching everything .



It is amazing what all you can do, especially with the HF rigs. I got into it for emergencies but turned out liking it for more than that.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:13 PM
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Once you reach the "now, what?" stage, consider learning Morse. CW is not only a great way to communicate, it's naturally narrow bandwidth, it cuts through when nothing else will, and it's easy to improvise from junk lying around after the Zombie Apocalypse.

Not only that, you ought to consider learning how to design and build your own equipment. The easiest thing to start with is a low power CW rig.

eta: plus, you look cool being able to translate Morse they embed into movies and TV shows, when it's not just random beeps.
edit on 2-1-2017 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker
I think you aught to delete that bit about preppers in your post. The reason being that preppers are preparing for a SHTF scenario and if the S does really hit the fan then just who is going to bother about getting a licence. It's not that they need the radio now (so they wont be using it) but in the event.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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me got one

remember folks, no xmitting on ham bands unless you get the license.

feel free to listen in but do NOT broadcast. FCC no like.

146.52 is the general calling frequency; most action will be on your local repeaters.

check this site
www.repeaterbook.com...
for more info.

(no affiliated etc)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:33 PM
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I have mine and I also am a VE. Still learning Morse - its like a foreign language to me, but I have an elmer thats helping me. I have an old Kenwood HF, a Yaesu 2 meter and three handi-talkies.

We sponsor a middle school ham club that does pretty well with contests and round-ups, proud of them!



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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Second try at this, my phone and I need to come to an understanding.

Been licenced since '94, upgraded to general in '07. Im picking up code for the fun of it and because of my grandpa. He was all about the code. Anyway, great thread and anyone who is thinking about getting into ham radio, go for it. You wont regret it and you just may have found a lifelong hobby.
73 to all on the thread



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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Got my technician license/call-sign in November- hamstudy.org was a great help, and I was able to take the exam for free at a local Seattle bookstore (www.seattletechnicalbooks.com...). Now studying for general exam and saving for a decent mobile/base station. Most of the transceivers that I want are way out of my price range, but what isn't out of that range?

Santa didn't bring me this: Expert Electronics SunSDR MB1


Main features Independent receive path with Digital Direct Conversion(DDC) Separate independent transmit path with Digital Up Conversion(DUC) Full duplex or half duplex mode* Two independent receiver channels with bandwidth up to 312 kHz and two sub-receivers in each channel. Antenna switch for two HF antennas Connector for control of external devices, 7 powerful switches with open collector Connector for connecting of mobile antenna Automatic Tuner Unit for HF band: Available as an option ALC input for connecting external power amplifier Four programmable PTT outputs for independent external PA control COM port for connecting external devices (power amplifiers, rotators, external PC etc.) Opportunity to insert BPF in HF front-end via RX IN and RX OUT connectors Embedded sub-octave band pass filters Opportunity to connect VHF transverters Using transceiver as a receiver for measurements Using transceiver as a signal generator (output DAC OUT) Frequency synchronization from 10 MHz reference oscillator Very small delay in CW mode (about 10 msec) Opportunity to use transceiver in SO2R mode Opportunity of remote control. PTT foot switch and CW key are connected to E-Coder SDR-control panel. Headset and E-Coder panel are connected to remote PC.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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My dad was HAM operator, I have always wanted to... He was ASA... Army Security Agency.... high speed Morse interceptor...




consider learning Morse.


what do you do Morse words per minute? just asking. Never heard heard anybody do more than my father...

We were watching that show where people race around the world and do challenges, (can't think of the name..) one was a challenge in a ww2 bunker to send a morse code message. My dad is like 75, I asked if he could send it, he said yeah, give me a second... everybody that tried failed...



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
Once you reach the "now, what?" stage, consider learning Morse. CW is not only a great way to communicate, it's naturally narrow bandwidth, it cuts through when nothing else will, and it's easy to improvise from junk lying around after the Zombie Apocalypse.

Not only that, you ought to consider learning how to design and build your own equipment. The easiest thing to start with is a low power CW rig.

eta: plus, you look cool being able to translate Morse they embed into movies and TV shows, when it's not just random beeps.



I have looked into that in the past. They have the kits on ebay. You make a great point. I keep procrastinating on CW.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: eql612



Im picking up code for the fun of it and because of my grandpa. He was all about the code. . 73 to all on the thread

73 words per minute?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: iTruthSeeker
I think you aught to delete that bit about preppers in your post. The reason being that preppers are preparing for a SHTF scenario and if the S does really hit the fan then just who is going to bother about getting a licence. It's not that they need the radio now (so they wont be using it) but in the event.


The prepper who buys a radio now but never uses it... is an idiot.

Preppers are exactly the people who should be getting the licence, learning how to use the equipment to best effect, and establishing local networks.

It's like someone who can't drive, buying a car with a manual transmission, but saying they'll learn to drive stick "when the SHTF" and not a moment sooner.



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