It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

China and the fake space walk

page: 2
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 11:22 PM
link   
I thought the bubbles coming from the astronauts helmet were the biggest giveaway it was fake. Seems space is not a vacuum but is filled with water


Sorry not the best video, but makes the point. (With a huge arrow)





posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: [post=21706760]chadderson[/post

In my experience, bubbles don't really accelerate much. That's why it's a good way to gauge your rate of ascent when SCUBA diving. "Never rise faster than your bubbles."


Certified Dive Instructor here...I strongly disagree. In 20m depth, you have a third of your lung volume, to reinflate it you need 3x more air than on the surface. When you breath out, the bubbles start to accelerate upwards. When the bubbles inflate because the surrounding water pressure declines, the acceleration is slowed down a bit because it has trippled it´s volume and has more water to displace on it´s way upward.

It´s kind of like a terminal velocity for underwater. I´ve spent hours on the seafloor, making bubble rings, over the decades while doing DECO.

Now this:
"Never rise faster than your bubbles."
True. And it´s tied to the fact that bubbles are accelerating (!). Remember you have a weightbelt between 1-8kg, depending on what you wear and how fat you are. If you drop it at 20m and let the air drag you up, while exhaling, you´ll slowly start to accelerate and gain speed. You do not paddle up when rising, except for an emergency and then you keep your head in the neck to allow the inflating air in your lung to force it´s way out if necessary.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 09:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: verschickter

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: [post=21706760]chadderson[/post



Thank you, as a diver I was about to say the same thing, that is one of the first things you learn in dive class concerning ascent.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:49 AM
link   
a reply to: verschickter




It´s kind of like a terminal velocity for underwater.

Yes, I know. A velocity which is reached very quickly because of the viscosity of the water.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 02:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage
Very quickly = 2-3m, depending on the saline amount dissolved in the water.
And that would be in perfect range from his helmet (the bubble is at the helmet). No comment on the other stuff but you can´t rule out it´s an air bubble by saying it won´t accelerate like that, when it really does.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 02:21 PM
link   
a reply to: verschickter

I would give it less than a meter to reach "terminal velocity." But one cannot ignore the behavior of the other "bubbles" either.
edit on 1/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 02:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




There are no bubbles. That's stuff leaving the capsule. Bits of debris. Covered in detail in the link provided earlier.


Covered as in the guy gave his opinion? Why do these pieces of stuff keep coming out of the capsule throughout the video?
edit on 1/2/2017 by TheFaceOfTheEarth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 03:58 PM
link   
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth
Covered as in an analysis of the motion of the objects.

I don't see stuff "throughout" the video but in any case, if something wandering around inside the capsule finds the hatch, it leaves.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 04:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth
Covered as in an analysis of the motion of the objects.

I don't see stuff "throughout" the video but in any case, if something wandering around inside the capsule finds the hatch, it leaves.



People come to a mine a friend of mine ( * ) operates ... they are looking for ghosts . They constantly photograph
' orbs ' - which are tiny dust particles caught at odd moments of light and distance . I can show them how to minimize the distortion... but-they're not interested .
Nothing is constant in vacuum space or in water , and often behave ' unreliably ' with the slightest input .
That's wonder enough for me .



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 04:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

The pieces are being ejected out, what force is ejecting them? You could say there was a slight pressure differential between the airlock and the space outside when the hatch was opened. Since this would be gone immediately, what is ejecting these pieces after that?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:06 PM
link   
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth
Ejected?
Like I said, any object wandering around inside the capsule will, when encountering an open hatch, leave.

As pointed out by another, expecting things to behave the same way on orbit as they do on the surface is a fallacy.


edit on 1/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:09 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

So these pieces were already moving at that velocity in the capsule? Bouncing off walls till they found an opening?




As pointed out by another, expecting things to behave the same way on orbit as they do on the surface is a fallacy.


I don't see how I was arguing from an Earth based situation.
edit on 1/2/2017 by TheFaceOfTheEarth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:18 PM
link   
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth
Why not?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Because BS.

What gave these pieces of stuff their initial acceleration?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:38 PM
link   
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth
Orbital maneuvers. Depressurization. Taikonauts moving around in the capsule. Taikonaut leaving the capsule.

You really think they didn't walk in space?

edit on 1/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:50 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




Depressurization.


This should've sucked everything right out.




Taikonauts moving around in the capsule. Taikonaut leaving the capsule.


Sure, they can't even make movements fast enough to give a piece of stuff that velocity, and why do the pieces seem to accelerate as they move away?




You really think they didn't walk in space?


I don't believe in those fairytales Phage.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




Orbital maneuvers.


Swamp gas.


What kind of orbital maneuvers would that be? Firing boosters while one guy is hangin out of the hatch?
edit on 1/2/2017 by TheFaceOfTheEarth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheFaceOfTheEarth
I don't believe in those fairytales Phage.


So you are saying that no country has ever accomplished a space walk?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:07 PM
link   
a reply to: TheFaceOfTheEarth


This should've sucked everything right out.
According to your vast experience in such matters. Tell me, how was depressurization accomplished? Do you think they just opened the hatch?


Sure, they can't even make movements fast enough to give a piece of stuff that velocity, and why do the pieces seem to accelerate as they move away?
What velocity, a couple of feet per second? Maybe?

As I mentioned previously, without knowing the actual vector of the object, determining "acceleration" from the video is not really possible.


I don't believe in those fairytales Phage.
Huh. Do you believe in space travel at all?


What kind of orbital maneuvers would that be?
The maneuvers to place the capsule in its desired orbit. They don't use boosters for that, they use smaller devices. In US space craft it's called the OMS (orbital manuevering system). You asked would could have set the stuff in motion in the capsule.



edit on 1/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




According to your vast experience in such matters. Tell me, how was depressurization accomplished? Do you think they just opened the hatch?


No I don't, that's why depressurisation is a bad argument.




What velocity, a couple of feet per second? Maybe?


They travel faster than an astronaut can move his arm in that suit, throwing it. Since they didn't throw it, you are saying a slight body movement made these pieces eject out?




Huh. Do you believe in space travel at all?


Not in the stuff they show and tell us anyway.




The maneuvers to place the capsule in its desired orbit. They don't use boosters for that, they use smaller devices. In US space craft it's called the OMS (orbital manuevering system). You asked would could have set the stuff in motion in the capsule.


So this is a given? When orbital maneuvers are made everyhting that is not bolted down flies through the spacecraft. I imagine they didn't do that during that spacewalk but at least some time before that. So all this time these pieces of stuff had been bouncing through the capsule constantly hitting walls until a large part of them actually happen to encounter the opening, and fly out at the same angle.






edit on 1/2/2017 by TheFaceOfTheEarth because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join