Winters warm up

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posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 08:14 AM
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"The heat wave that hit Europe in the summer of 2003 resulted in thousands of deaths in France, Italy and several other European countries. However, a new analysis by a Swiss climate scientist has shown that the temperature changes that occur at high altitudes during the "warm winter spells" are even larger than those that happen during the summer (Geophys. Res. Lett. 32 L01812).

Martin Beniston of the University of Fribourg analysed data from 11 climate recording stations in Switzerland and found that the incidence of warm winter spells has increased since 1970. In 2003, for instance, the average temperature recorded at Saentis, a town in the northwest of Switzerland, was 15°C above the seasonal average during the winter, compared with 11.5°C for the summer. A similar pattern was observed in data from other stations. Moreover, climate simulations for the period 2071--2100 suggest warm winter spells are going to become more common.

Beniston says that these anomalies could be caused by the North Atlantic Oscillation or Atlantic El Niño - a cyclic pattern of atmospheric pressure variability that affects the weather of North America and Europe. According to pressure records from Bern and Zurich, persistent high pressure over Switzerland has more than doubled since the 1960s, leading to higher mean temperatures, lower than average precipitation and reduced snow cover in the Alps."

physicsweb.org...

This very important data that directy relates to Valhall's theory of "catastophism"(sp?). Global climate change can happen in a very short cycle. Perhaps even this year.............




posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 08:16 AM
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Two days ago, it was warm enough to be outside without a jacket on. Today, its about 25 degrees and we have a winter weather advisory for much of Kentucky, as well as Indiana. I would say things are getting pretty screwy around here.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 08:35 AM
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Originally posted by Kidfinger
Two days ago, it was warm enough to be outside without a jacket on. Today, its about 25 degrees and we have a winter weather advisory for much of Kentucky, as well as Indiana. I would say things are getting pretty screwy around here.


Exactly why I call it "global climate change" Large swings in temp. But the greatest issue here is summer "night" temps are mush higher than in days past. Sometimes 20 deg. F. I did a paper in this 15 years ago for the Electric power industry. So far everything I was "ridiculed" about is coming true.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 08:39 AM
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Originally posted by DrHoracid

Originally posted by Kidfinger
Two days ago, it was warm enough to be outside without a jacket on. Today, its about 25 degrees and we have a winter weather advisory for much of Kentucky, as well as Indiana. I would say things are getting pretty screwy around here.


I did a paper in this 15 years ago for the Electric power industry. So far everything I was "ridiculed" about is coming true.


If you still have the paper, I would enjoy reading it. Could you post it?



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Kidfinger
Two days ago, it was warm enough to be outside without a jacket on. Today, its about 25 degrees and we have a winter weather advisory for much of Kentucky, as well as Indiana. I would say things are getting pretty screwy around here.


That's actually common and not "screwy" at all. In fact that's the norm (for much of the US). If it stayed warm all the time or cold all the time then that'd be screwy, but temperture swings like that are how we come up with what's average.

Here, we have a very warm start to January. It even hit 70! But the weather corrected itself (like it tends to do) and it has been much colder the past couple of weeks. When January is through the avg. temp for January will be **get this** normal



Whether it takes years or a couple days, the weather seems to always have this way of making up for what it did or did not do. That would happen whether humans were here or not. Big temperature swings would happen whether humans were here or not.


If every human on earth were gathered together at one place and had a jar of some sort of greenhouse gas (pick one). And at once everyone on earth opened their jar......the damage done would still be much less than an average volcanic erupution.

I also did a paper on this issue (unfortunately I don't have it)...
What's funny is that, had the invention and increase use of cars, coal and electrical plants, and every thing else that spews out not so healthy emmissions...had these been invented and used during a cycle of global cooling we'd be at this moment talking about how these things are cooling the earth, but since it coincided with a warming cycle, they're causing global warming. Always us though (despite us being just specks on this planet), never the earth's fault.

On a smaller scale (such as big cities) there is warming...but that's basic science. If I cover a small ball with both my hands, wouldn't the ball be warmer than if it were on the outside of my hands?



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by ThatsJustWeird


That's actually common and not "screwy" at all. In fact that's the norm (for much of the US). If it stayed warm all the time or cold all the time then that'd be screwy, but temperture swings like that are how we come up with what's average.



Not typical for where I live. Once January hits, normally, we dont get anything above 35 degrees. Hitting 55 in January here in Louisville Ky was not a common occurance untill about 3 years ago. In the last 10 years, our winter has progressivly inched forward in time.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by ThatsJustWeird

If every human on earth were gathered together at one place and had a jar of some sort of greenhouse gas (pick one). And at once everyone on earth opened their jar......the damage done would still be much less than an average volcanic erupution.

I


I agree the traditional "greenhouse gas" BS is wrong. What is changing (warming) things up the the use of electricity.

ALL kW consumed makes its way back into the atmosphere as heat. Much of it escapes into space, however, a significant amount does get retained.

Solar cycles are affecting this planet.

Scalar weapons experiments and direct use are "heating" the atmosphere.

Greenhouse gases are complete BS and perhaps even a cover story. The "giant" holes in the ozone back in the late 80's was not from CFC's.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by DrHoracid

I agree the traditional "greenhouse gas" BS is wrong. What is changing (warming) things up the the use of electricity.


I agree. The data that is being presented shows this.



Solar cycles are affecting this planet.


I think this is the biggest piece to the global climate chang puzzel. People should check out the increase in solar activity the last thirty years and the impacts of solar super flares on our entire eco system. People might be suprised to find out the results.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by Kidfinger
Solar cycles are affecting this planet.


"July 14, 2000
Web posted at: 2:42 PM EDT (1842 GMT)


GREENBELT, Maryland (CNN) -- Scientists detected a strong Coronal Mass Ejection, also called a CME or a solar flare, leaving the sun Friday morning.

The event lasted 40 minutes and peaked at 6:24 a.m. EDT. Instruments onboard the Solar and Heliographic Observatory (SOHO) captured images of the flare, which should be available later Friday.

Experts said a CME of this size and strength will probably trigger unusually strong displays of the northern lights on Saturday and Sunday nights. It is also possible, though less likely, that the flare could interrupt satellite communications or disrupt power transmission on Earth.

Solar flares are eruptions of gases expelled through space at speeds of 600 miles per second or more. The high-energy solar winds have been known to temporarily alter the Earth's magnetic field -- often increasing displays of the northern and southern lights. They are eerily beautiful, usually greenish-colored streaks of light often seen near the poles. "

archives.cnn.com...




Toasty Huh...........



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:28 AM
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Thats a nice warm picture for a cold day like today
I wouldnt want to get to close though



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:34 AM
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But this is not catastrophic change, its warming over a period of 30 years. How much of the warming was attributed to any growth of the town?



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
But this is not catastrophic change, its warming over a period of 30 years. How much of the warming was attributed to any growth of the town?


OK, when climatologist say things like 1-2 deg C over 100 years and there is evidence of 10-20 deg F over 15 years, that is catastrophic change. The point to the whole heat island theory is that "towns" have grown into large cities and centers of great populace like china and india are "electrifying" at a very rapid pace.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 11:11 AM
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You can think of a city as a large heatsink and the buildings are the fins. Basically, the surounding heat is given off and released into the atmosphere at an alarming rate. I dont think the heat transfer has as much affect on our environments as the solar flares do.

[edit on 1/28/05 by Kidfinger]



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 12:17 PM
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I wish that warm weather would hurry up and get here. It's been around -25 C during the day here for about a week...in the -30's at night, with a -40 something windchill.


brrrrrrrr



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by sensfan
I wish that warm weather would hurry up and get here. It's been around -25 C during the day here for about a week...in the -30's at night, with a -40 something windchill.


brrrrrrrr


Yeah, but that is to be expected in Canada!
That is a cold friggen place!



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 12:23 PM
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Actually, the most densly populated places in Canada aren't any different than your northern states. In fact, some parts of Canada are further south than some parts of the states ( I don't mean Alaska) and are warmer.



posted on Jan, 28 2005 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by sensfan
Actually, the most densly populated places in Canada aren't any different than your northern states. In fact, some parts of Canada are further south than some parts of the states ( I don't mean Alaska) and are warmer.


that is not saying much
Look at New england. That is one cold place! Actually, in Kentucky, where I live, is about as north as you want to go if you want to avoid really cold and crappy winters. Anything North of here usually gets a few snowfalls over a foot, each year. I hate snow.





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