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Talking about high tech? Tritium Titanium Alloy Tail Light Cap For Blackwater SR71

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posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
a reply to: Bedlam

Ok...

So what replaced it ?

As we did not stop for nothing : )


Better parts. Having a light you can't turn off is marginally useful




posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:49 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
Tritium was used then and now.


Glad to see you made the required correction to your typical initially erroneous comment regarding the topic.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Whaa!

* absorbed the rest.

Tnx!



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant


But what are we doing..
• speeding up time?
• Focusing what was already here?
• Diverting energy?
• Messing with nature?


Bringing the process of sun down here to earth. The sun already provides all the heat and light energy we need at a safe distance. The mega nuke power and arms industry doesn't care we contaminate the environment, obviously.

Their proponents will ridicule any attempt to point out the inherent dangers of the industry.

I have a couple threads addressing some aspects...

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

On the other hand, you really need tritium for nuclear weapons, so it's recycled like mad. But you lose it to decay (that short half life), you lose it in handling and you lose it in filtration. So eventually you need to make some.

We used to get a lot from candu reactors.
edit on 28-12-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Intrestring... so the eternal black sun is not usable for atomic detonation...

Am i'm going off track thinking implosion versus explosion ?



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:05 PM
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a reply to: intrptr




The reason they encase it so carefully in modern sights is because it is radioactive and anything radioactive is potentially dangerous.


Wrong. It is encased in such a manner so as to assure that the lamps will hold up to repeated recoil forces, blunt impacts, and even extreme temperature changes.

Also tritium is dangerous in very large doses. What you find in tritium corundum buels is not nearly enough to really cause problems even if ingested.

I would highly recommend you do more reading on this subject. You're coming off matter of fact, when you are using zero facts.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

You need tritium for boost gas and the initiator. Most nuke designs require both, unless they're fringey specialty weapons.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:13 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: intrptr




If its really Tritium, its radioactive. It will decay the housing over time and leak jellied radioactive goo.


I have tritium night sights and optics on all of my firearms. Nothing has melted yet. Pretty sure Tritium, properly encased, isn't that crazy.


I too have H3 on ALL of my weapons except my sniper rifle. I've even had to send in one of my sights back to Trijicon to have replacement tubes after a little more than a decade of use. No goo seen or found. And at night, 10 feet away, they can't be seen even when you stand directly behind them. My IsoBrite watch is much more bright than my sights. Come to think about it, my Seiko dive watch is over 25 years old and it hasn't melted. Very dim it is, but no goo.
edit on V572016Wednesdaypm31America/ChicagoWed, 28 Dec 2016 21:57:35 -06001 by Violater1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

So it's part of the chain reaction and therefore still a necessary for keeping stock/production, i get that.

Another bow, any peaceful applications you can think of?

Is the long term battery thing useful ?
Sensors are getting more and more low V/A

Remember the nice operating software gadgets that included: set and forget

place/drop/float/flow and forget... for a year of 25...

Could be powerful stuff.. especially in Nano.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: intrptr




The tritium in sights on M16s in the 80's rotted the glass vials they were contained in, turning them to glow in the dark jelly.


The earliest use of tritium in weapon sights was in 1975. And it was an optic very much the precursor to today's TA01 ACOG.

None of the effects you listed took place on those weapons. In fact, after about 12-15 years, depending on the phosphor gas used, they would stop glowing entirely.

No M16s were outfitted with night sights and issued to any soldier in the 80s. Trijicon(as it is known today) is the pioneer of tritium self luminous sighting systems. Their systems were first used in the US military in the early 90s as the TA01 ACOG. It is still considered top of the line and priced accordingly.

If you're gonna spread BS at least make sure no one who knows what they are talking about is around.


edit on 28 12 16 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:21 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

It's useful if you can get by with a couple hundred nA of current. You can make bigger but they require licensing and use something hotter than tritium.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

No, present some sort of example of what you claim. That's usually how discussions work. You say that it turns things to goo. Then you have something like proof.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

You'd think after so many people telling this guy he is wrong, he'd finally get it.

Lead a horse to water and what not.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Ah I see, fair enough.
Questions.. Questions..

I'm battling now between ego, fishing, and of-course the born drive to add,

it gives me some-kind of eternal hotness...



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Just let it go!

Victory !



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

It's not "Let it go" it's "Deny Ignorance". Which that particular member is willfully engaging in.

It is also a scientific discussion. What said member is doing is engaging in pseudoscience, like so many on this site, and calling it a fact.

Also lying..There's that.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:53 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: intrptr




The tritium in sights on M16s in the 80's rotted the glass vials they were contained in, turning them to glow in the dark jelly.


The earliest use of tritium in weapon sights was in 1975. And it was an optic very much the precursor to today's TA01 ACOG.

None of the effects you listed took place on those weapons. In fact, after about 12-15 years, depending on the phosphor gas used, they would stop glowing entirely.

No M16s were outfitted with night sights and issued to any soldier in the 80s. Trijicon(as it is known today) is the pioneer of tritium self luminous sighting systems. Their systems were first used in the US military in the early 90s as the TA01 ACOG. It is still considered top of the line and priced accordingly.

If you're gonna spread BS at least make sure no one who knows what they are talking about is around.



Oooohh, you said the magic word (TA01 ACOG).

The one on the left. It hasn't melted, but there are some that wished it did.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: Violater1

Too all: Lets agree that guns don't melt from Tritium that simple even around rapid oxidation induced lead spreading.

And now on about the benefits !



posted on Dec, 29 2016 @ 06:47 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn


Also tritium is dangerous in very large doses. What you find in tritium corundum bulls is not nearly enough to really cause problems even if ingested.

There is no such thing as a acceptable low dose or safe minimum exposure. Like other terms used in the nuclear industry they are disingenuous, designed to lull people into acceptance.

I did try to explain that (with sources) further up. Actually requires some reading, as well.



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