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Talking about high tech? Tritium Titanium Alloy Tail Light Cap For Blackwater SR71

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posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

Weapons production , medicine, power generation, all utilize various forms. Problem is once created, only thing reduces radioactivity is decay over time.

Some 'half lives' are millennia...

A half life is defined as the time it takes for a source of radioactive material to decay to half its size. A half life for Tritium is 12.5 years (?), which means that the mass of tritium decreases in size by half every twelve years.

So half and half and half again, leaving some amount behind to eventually decay whatever container holds it, releasing it to the environment eventually. Thats why waste storage is so important, which is problematic for most waste from whatever processes and products that are radioactive.

Containment eventually erodes. All the fuel in reactors that ever were are still being stored in spent fuel pools, they haven't found a solution yet for what to do with it all.




posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
a reply to: imitator

Ofcourse!

Look at the first pic... and thats with all the exotics..

In basic You could actually make this battery for:

± $ 15 Tritium sticks x solar panel surface
± $ 5 (Solar gadget / joule thief ) as donor materials
± $ .97 Capacitor


It's not very efficient to make light with a beta emitter and then electricity with the light using a PV cell. That's why they have beta batteries.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
Further: Watch dials used to be lit by it..


Watches are still made with tritium.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

um, no. Tritium is a low level beta emitter. It's not very radioactive, and it certainly won't rot M16 stocks.


"not very radioactive", unless inhaled or ingested.

The tritium in sights on M16s in the 80's rotted the glass vials they were contained in, turning them to glow in the dark jelly.

I'm assured by Project that the new modern sights are much more... durable.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: intrptr
Further: Watch dials used to be lit by it..


Watches are still made with tritium.


They used to paint watch and clock dials with radium, caused some people to get cancer. Radium is a more dangerous emitter than tritium.

Edit:

self lighting uses for tritium today
edit on 28-12-2016 by intrptr because: link



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:26 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
Thats the problem with this stuff..

LONG term effects on the human.

But what if it is part of our system already, ... using it ..or not.. ?






Not only is tritium's half life brief, having ingested it, your body disposes of it fairly quickly. It's not considered a big hazard.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I understand.

But what are we doing..
• speeding up time?
• Focusing what was already here?
• Diverting energy?
• Messing with nature?

I get confused sometimes...

I think nature has all the answers.. and we should start facilitating instead of shaping..
On the other hand.. I'm looking as well for a break.. in ..well in .. progress .. in mind.. energy.. thinking.. human values...

Anyway.. mostly I enjoy the journey



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:27 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
They used to paint watch and clock dials with radium, caused some people to get cancer. Radium is a more dangerous emitter than tritium.


Who cares about radium? You said watches used to be made with tritium, as in past tense, this is not accurate.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:27 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

um, no. Tritium is a low level beta emitter. It's not very radioactive, and it certainly won't rot M16 stocks.


"not very radioactive", unless inhaled or ingested.

The tritium in sights on M16s in the 80's rotted the glass vials they were contained in, turning them to glow in the dark jelly.

I'm assured by Project that the new modern sights are much more... durable.


You're wrong about the entire rotting thing.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

So it is an actual usefull product in your opinion?

( I know some low power realtime clocks use it , and you can buy ready made ultra low amp modules )

Is it scale-able ?



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I understand.

But I was not talking efficiency, as more the accessibility in public domain of the materials and receivers.

Because if we start to talk about exotic acces... well...

You would have to enlighten me ; )



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam


Not only is tritium's half life brief, having ingested it, your body disposes of it fairly quickly. It's not considered a big hazard.

There is no such thing as a 'safe minimum dose' for radioactive elements inside the body.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

um, no. Tritium is a low level beta emitter. It's not very radioactive, and it certainly won't rot M16 stocks.


"not very radioactive", unless inhaled or ingested.

The tritium in sights on M16s in the 80's rotted the glass vials they were contained in, turning them to glow in the dark jelly.

I'm assured by Project that the new modern sights are much more... durable.


You're wrong about the entire rotting thing.

Link?



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:38 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
a reply to: Bedlam

So it is an actual usefull product in your opinion?

( I know some low power realtime clocks use it , and you can buy ready made ultra low amp modules )

Is it scale-able ?



I've yet to see tritium powered electronics outside ones hooked to a beta cell. Beta batteries are very low power output. So they're generally used in really specialized circumstances. I know you can make really bright beta powered light sources, and they played around with beta powered laser beacons years ago.

Makes dandy weapon sights. But tritium's expensive and hard to come by. We used to buy ours from Canada after we stopped making it. Eventually we'll have to build a production reactor to keep the support chain full. You lose some every time you handle it.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:40 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Bedlam


Not only is tritium's half life brief, having ingested it, your body disposes of it fairly quickly. It's not considered a big hazard.

There is no such thing as a 'safe minimum dose' for radioactive elements inside the body.


You have radioisotopes in your body naturally. Plus you are bombarded by background radiation non-stop. Plus you have to factor in hormesis. It's not a simplistic topic.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Are you asking me to prove a negative?



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Ok...

So what replaced it ?

As we did not stop for nothing : )



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:45 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: intrptr
They used to paint watch and clock dials with radium, caused some people to get cancer. Radium is a more dangerous emitter than tritium.


Who cares about radium? You said watches used to be made with tritium, as in past tense, this is not accurate.

Tritium was used then and now. Get on with your usual nitpick act, disguising your next abuse carefully within the TnC.


First, beginning in the 1950s or 1960s, watches that used tritium would either have two small "T"s on the bottom of the dials by the 6 or have "T (less than)25" labels. The " (less than)25" means that there was originally less than 25 milliCuries of radioactive tritium. Watches that used radium would similarly be marked with an "R" or "Ra". This technique will not work to identify earlier watches.

link



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
a reply to: Bedlam

I understand.

But I was not talking efficiency, as more the accessibility in public domain of the materials and receivers.

Because if we start to talk about exotic acces... well...

You would have to enlighten me ; )


You used to be able to buy them. I could, anyway. Expensive, low power.

(Looks) yep, a general US consumer can get them, no tritium license needed.



posted on Dec, 28 2016 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: intrptr

Are you asking me to prove a negative?

Are you asking me to debunk unsourced innuendo?

Heres where I bow out. The next barrage of posts will serve only to ridicule or attack the poster rather than addressing content.

had my say, intrptr out.



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