It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Handgun Safety

page: 1
14
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 12:57 PM
link   
I am writing papers for college credits (one way out of having to take all my classes again this late in life). One of the papers was on gun safety. My professor said that if ever he had read a paper that needed to be shared it was this one...
First I would like to say this post is not about pro or anti guns. This is a thread about handgun safety. There are other types of guns that are not covered in this post. I am hoping that people read this, please add if you feel you have other tips that will help. Please do not derail this thread.
*I have placed this is The Grey Area because this is my opinion and experience


Handgun Safety



If you are going to understand handgun safety I feel that you first need to understand the types of handguns. First there is the single-shot pistol, a miniature hand-held cannon which discharges only one round before having to be reloaded. A small Derringer pistol would be an example of a single-shot pistol. Next is the multi-barreled pistol, this is a handgun that contains more than one barrel so that the shooter does not have to reload after each shot. One example of a multi-barreled handgun is the .577 Snider. The revolver was created in the early 19th century to allow multi loading of ammunition. It contains a cylindrical chamber that will allow the shooter to load usually 5-8 bullets. Still popular and in use today, with the most recognized being Dirty Harry’s Smith & Wesson Model 29 or the .44 Magnum. Two other types are the semi-automatic and the automatic handguns. Both use the same mechanics by using the energy of a discharge to automatically reload the chamber with the next available round of ammunition. The difference in the two automatic guns is how they respond to a trigger pull. With a semi-automatic handgun, you must pull the trigger each time for it to discharge a round, while an automatic handgun is capable of rapid or consecutive fire with only one trigger pull. An example of a semi-automatic would be TEC-9 or a Glock 26. An example of the automatic would be machine gun, such as the Beretta 93R. Fully automatic guns are still legal in the United States but they are heavily regulated.

One of the most important points of handgun safety is to realize, there are no accidental discharges. It comes down to either negligence, carelessness, or a defective firearm. If you own a handgun, then you should be familiar with every aspect of that handgun and how it functions. You should practice on a regular basis so that it is always familiar to you. When practicing, you should follow all safety rules but into place. This will teach you the proper way to handle a gun and it will become second nature.

There are three elements to gun safety; a positive attitude, gun knowledge, and skill in operating handguns. A gun is a lethal weapon and should be treated as such. At no time should a gun be picked up with anger or ill-intent. You need to have all the knowledge needed to safely operate your gun. This includes the safety rules and regulations in the area where you are. These rules differ by area so if you go to a new location you need to research to see if they have differing laws or regulations. And skill in operating handguns. This goes back to knowing your gun. You need to know how to load, unload, clean, and to turn the safety on and off properly.

There are four simple gun safety rules that you should always follow. First, you should treat every gun as if it is loaded. This ensures that you never discharge a round you forgot about. Second, you should never place your finger on the trigger until you are ready to fire. Have the target in your sights but only when you have made the decision that you are going to fire. Third, never point a gun at something you are not willing to destroy. Again, going back to a gun being a lethal weapon, you should only point it when you are willing to use lethal force. And lastly, take in your full surroundings. You may be shooting at your target but what other items or people are in your target’s environment? You need to consider what other targets will be hit.
There are also rules that you need to follow if you are going to conceal carry. Your concealed handgun is there for the protection of life only. It should only be drawn if you are going to protect you or someone else from a criminal attack that may result in serious bodily injury. You must know the circumstances when using your concealed handgun are legal. The other party must have the ability to inflict serious bodily injury or death, they must have the opportunity to inflict serious bodily injury or death, and they must have the intent to act. If you are able to avoid the confrontation, then you must remove yourself and fight back only as a last resort. You should also never display your firearm unless you are brought to the point of firing. You have permit for a concealed weapon, it should remain concealed at all times. If you take the responsibility of carrying a concealed weapon you agree not to let your emotions get involved. If you are not able to separate emotions from the situation, you do not need to conceal carry.

It is up to the gun owner to know where you can and cannot carry a gun. Certain areas are always legally restricted and as such you should never carry a firearm on these premises. Airport security areas, Court secure areas, National parks, Federal Buildings, and any correctional or mental health facility is a banned area. There may be other areas covered by your state law that you should also be aware of. Any private business can also restrict weapons by posting a sign that you must adhere to.




posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 01:19 PM
link   
Also proper storage when you are not carrying.

My grandfathers both had gun safes the first thing they would do when they got home from work was take off Their badge and lock up the pistol.

Good Post,

Respectfully,
~meathead



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 01:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Mike Stivic
So very true!! Thanks Mike!!



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 01:44 PM
link   
Excellent essay martin. I couldnt agree more.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 01:55 PM
link   
The information was good, but, in my opinion the presentation was a bit skewed. However I don't know the professor that you were writing this for. I have put a slant on a paper to make it more favorably received several times, so I'll pass on that.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 02:06 PM
link   
Looks good man.. Too bad you need to write an essay.. I mean all you'd need to really do is type in "gun safety memes" in google and that would pretty much sum up the gist of what not to do. Lol.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 02:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mike Stivic
Also proper storage when you are not carrying.

My grandfathers both had gun safes the first thing they would do when they got home from work was take off Their badge and lock up the pistol.

Good Post,

Respectfully,
~meathead


Right, so when the home invaders arrive, you can ask them to wait so you can retrieve your pistol.

Shotgun by the door and pistols on my lady and my nightstands. When you need firepower, seconds count.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 02:48 PM
link   
a reply to: olaru12

Cool story bro.

You have toddlers or young kids in the house?

~meathead



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 02:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mike Stivic
a reply to: olaru12

Cool story bro.

You have toddlers or young kids in the house?

~meathead


Story?.....
www.sunherald.com...

www.eastbaytimes.com...

www.kiro7.com...

You need to protect those kids...bro



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:01 PM
link   
a reply to: BASSPLYR

Thanks Dave!



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: Mike Stivic
Also proper storage when you are not carrying.

My grandfathers both had gun safes the first thing they would do when they got home from work was take off Their badge and lock up the pistol.

Good Post,

Respectfully,
~meathead


Right, so when the home invaders arrive, you can ask them to wait so you can retrieve your pistol.

Shotgun by the door and pistols on my lady and my nightstands. When you need firepower, seconds count.


So your sleeping in your bed you hear a loud thud grab your gun head towards the front door only to be met by the thief with his newly acquired shotgun he sees leaning against the wall..

Solid plan...

~meathead



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mike Stivic

originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: Mike Stivic
Also proper storage when you are not carrying.

My grandfathers both had gun safes the first thing they would do when they got home from work was take off Their badge and lock up the pistol.

Good Post,

Respectfully,
~meathead







Right, so when the home invaders arrive, you can ask them to wait so you can retrieve your pistol.

Shotgun by the door and pistols on my lady and my nightstands. When you need firepower, seconds count.


So your sleeping in your bed you hear a loud thud grab your gun head towards the front door only to be met by the thief with his newly acquired shotgun he sees leaning against the wall..

Solid plan...

~meathead



It's not leaning against the wall snowflake. It's hidden Meathead....

btw...I saved my neighbor ladys life when I heard her screaming...from being stabbed bro.

You have no idea what you're talking about. As ex military I know firearms courtesy of the USAF.















edit on 26-12-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: Mike Stivic
a reply to: olaru12

Cool story bro.

You have toddlers or young kids in the house?

~meathead


Story?.....
www.sunherald.com...

www.eastbaytimes.com...

www.kiro7.com...

You need to protect those kids...bro


And I can link as many stories that you want of children picking up and injuring or killing each other with unsecured weapons in the house.

If you don't have kids in the house and you want to strategically place unsecured weapons around your house than more power to you.

Sry Martin for the derail.

Respectfully,
~meathead
edit on 26-12-2016 by Mike Stivic because: laughing at you calling me a snowflake wow.. check my post history



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Mike Stivic

It is the moron who leaves a weapon cooked with a round in the chamber that I can't stand. Gives all of us a bad name. I keep my semi-automatic near by with the mag out and no round in the chamber. If I don't have the few seconds to load it, it isn't really going to matter.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Mike Stivic

Not a derail....it's safety.

If you want a gun to safely leave out around children look into biometric guns



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 03:37 PM
link   
a reply to: Martin75

Yes but the positive message and tone of this thread was temporarily tarnished.

Perhaps my use of the term "cool story bro"
Was an unfortunate choice. My apologies,Olaru, and thanks for your service.

Let's get back to gun safety!

Respectfully,
~meathead



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 04:03 PM
link   
a reply to: Martin75

Or as an alternative... quick release gun safes.

My daughter prefers a SpeedVault.

Speed Vault

We've no children in the home so olaru12's setup is pretty much ours as well.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 04:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Mike Stivic

My parents did.

One of the earliest lessons I learned was "Don't touch!!!", said lesson was reinforced with the occasional smack on the butt. My dad's Smith and Wesson revolver was right where he could get to it instantly. So, too, was my Mom's. ...and I would never have dreamed of touching them without permission. Same lesson applied with my Granddad, who was a county sheriff during the Twenties and Thirties, who had his M1911 on his nightstand. His sons, and grandkids, all knew the golden rule: Don't Touch!!!

It's not a hard lesson to teach. I taught that same lesson to all my nieces and nephews. There are certain things in my home that you do not ever touch. My guns. Sharp knives (when they were very young). Any tools. They all learned it quickly and easily.

Yes, they were all loaded. My revolver. My newer automatic. My dbl. brl. shotgun. When I need 'em, I need 'em now.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 04:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: JIMC5499
a reply to: Mike Stivic

It is the moron who leaves a weapon cooked with a round in the chamber that I can't stand. Gives all of us a bad name. I keep my semi-automatic near by with the mag out and no round in the chamber. If I don't have the few seconds to load it, it isn't really going to matter.


Do you practice loading and firing under stress?

If not, a baseball bat is more suitable for your purposes. Makes a much better club than an unloaded gun.

FWIW, I own guns that stay constantly loaded, and the only time they are ever unloaded is during firing practice or for cleaning.

Some of them have been kept loaded 99.999% of the time for over a decade. Not once has one ever fired by itself.



posted on Dec, 26 2016 @ 04:20 PM
link   
a reply to: Martin75

i was taught many years ago this lesson on gun safety.

a safety is a man made device that can fail at any time. never point a gun, loaded or not, at anyone you don't intend to put down.



new topics

top topics



 
14
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join