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Is Trump still planning on raising import tarrifs to stop companies from sending jobs to china??

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posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: BestinShow

I don't don't there is any issue with the H1-B visas, I think its a great program to pull talent, what he needs to do is insure that those people on that program server to benefit the interest of the US. We just need stricter policies to insure they don't just take the education and bolt back, ala china.




posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

We don't know the absolute specifics on what it is he will be doing, however I hope it is some of the stuff you posted. Excellent post.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: JoshuaCox
The election over saturated me, so I haven't watched much politics lately.


Is trump still saying he is going to raise taxes on companies using cheap foreign labor to tap American markets? I think a lot of people on both sides think it is horrible the way manufacturing jobs are going to 1 dollar an hour slave labor.


I know with the carrier deal he basically bribed to stay by cutting their taxes, which is kinda the opposite lol.

Any word on his plans yet?


I think we should tear up the trade deals and only do business with Pro Capitalist Countries.
The Chinese Government owns the majority of all Big Companies in China called SOE - State Owned Enterprises

Any country that does not grant rights to labor as required under capitalism should have the trade ended.
That means you could say bye to NAFTA as well where workers have no rights.

The Gravy Train for Corporate Fascists and their investors needs to come to an end



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: JoshuaCox

originally posted by: DAVID64
I really, truly hope so. Ford makes a killing off it's "Tough American Truck" image, but they don't even rank on the "Made in America" list. You know who's first? Who actually make the most cars IN America and provides jobs?...............
Toyota.
What a fu**in joke.

fortune.com...


The phrase “made in America” has always pulled at the hearts and wallets of loyal, red-blooded consumers, and never more so than in the automotive space. But according to research released Monday, the car company that qualifies as most American is....the Toyota Camry.


Well I've always heard it cost more to ship a car than to build it there, but obviously Mexico should prob count as "building it here" for transportation purposes.

But I've always heard cars are the one job that can't get shipped over seas.


Car manufacturing can and has been shipped overseas. But car repair fortunately will always remain a local job. Same with plumbing, electrical work, construction, etc.... These are jobs that can't be completed in another country then shipped here.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: JoshuaCox

He's not in office yet. We'll see. Originally, 33 percent tariffs were the protection to prevent companies from leaving in the first place. But the corporations lobbied (bribed) politicians to change that, long ago. And will again to prevent increasing the tariff.




People need to keep an eye on these lobbyists and demonize them in the Media once they start playing their old tricks again.
The attention should not be directed toward Trump or Obama , Left or RIght though because that works in favor of lobbyists where they can push off the blame to others. We should be focused exactly on these corporate lobbyists



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Alright, well I won't disagree with that entirely. However, those kinds of deals take time, decades in many cases. We don't have decades. Tariffs are a much quicker solution.

Regarding Smoot-Hawley, well that was a completely different economic climate then vs. now. Many like to argue Smoot-Hawley had some gigantic bearing on the Great Depression. My rejoinder is the Great Depression was caused by Wall Street, trading and banking laws internally. Smoot-Hawley has historically just been a convenient excuse used by bankers who understand the system, and economists (who don't) to redirect the spotlight off of the Wall Street banks and stock trading.

Some say it prolonged the depression. Maybe, maybe not, but it didn't have to...if people would have been paying attention to begin with. The economic climate in the late 20's was not sustainable and Wall Street knew it. We got close to the same situation in 2008. Thankfully, today we don't have 'as much' of the sub-prime market issue, but we have another evil on the horizon...investments in "ideas" rather than "things". A classic example is FaceBook. FB doesn't produce a product, they have very few hard assets and they just produce an idea...yet people invest in these things. When push comes to shove and they collapse, there's no collateral, nothing to make good with.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


I think everyone should take a look at Smoot/Hawley before asking to have tariffs raised.

Unilateral trade deals would be the better bet.


With Smoot Hawley, we were a net exporter though, not so today.
The Trade Wars we are in are not to our benefit and except for the investor and corporate execs. The average American has been on the losing end the last 20 years

Time we started fighting back like they are



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Alright, well I won't disagree with that entirely. However, those kinds of deals take time, decades in many cases. We don't have decades. Tariffs are a much quicker solution.


I think renegotiating trade deals does not need to take decades. It is not the entire deal that would need adjusting, only certain aspects.


Regarding Smoot-Hawley, well that was a completely different economic climate then vs. now. Many like to argue Smoot-Hawley had some gigantic bearing on the Great Depression.


My reasons for including Smoot-Hawley was not that it created or lengthened the Depression (although I do feel it helped prolong the event), I mentioned it because it caused a retaliatory trade tariff battle which would occur today if we began imposing high tariffs on our trading partners.











edit on 22-12-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: jacobe001

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: JoshuaCox

He's not in office yet. We'll see. Originally, 33 percent tariffs were the protection to prevent companies from leaving in the first place. But the corporations lobbied (bribed) politicians to change that, long ago. And will again to prevent increasing the tariff.


People need to keep an eye on these lobbyists and demonize them in the Media once they start playing their old tricks again.
The attention should not be directed toward Trump or Obama , Left or RIght though because that works in favor of lobbyists where they can push off the blame to others. We should be focused exactly on these corporate lobbyists


They like got this whole infrastructure, downtown.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: jacobe001
With Smoot Hawley, we were a net exporter though, not so today


We are still the second largest exporter in the world. Import tariffs on American goods would be very adverse to that market.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: jacobe001

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: JoshuaCox

He's not in office yet. We'll see. Originally, 33 percent tariffs were the protection to prevent companies from leaving in the first place. But the corporations lobbied (bribed) politicians to change that, long ago. And will again to prevent increasing the tariff.


People need to keep an eye on these lobbyists and demonize them in the Media once they start playing their old tricks again.
The attention should not be directed toward Trump or Obama , Left or RIght though because that works in favor of lobbyists where they can push off the blame to others. We should be focused exactly on these corporate lobbyists


They like got this whole infrastructure, downtown.


Yep

In 1970, there were less than 200 Corporate and Banking Lobby Offices in DC
Today, there are over 2000 of these offices in DC

It is pretty obvious where the problem is and I do not see Trump booting them out



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Well, not exactly. You assume these goods are available elsewhere with that statement. You see this is just it, American exports have been reduced primarily to goods that can't be obtained elsewhere. In this case a retaliatory import tariff would only hurt the country imposing it. Much different scenario than in 1929.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Well, not exactly. You assume these goods are available elsewhere with that statement. You see this is just it, American exports have been reduced primarily to goods that can't be obtained elsewhere. In this case a retaliatory import tariff would only hurt the country imposing it. Much different scenario than in 1929.


Assume?

Our top exports are refined petroleum, automobiles, aerospace equipment, automobile parts and pharmaceuticals. These are all available elsewhere.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: jacobe001

Huh yah, after all , catching someone "in the hotel lobby" isn't illegal, is it...

Bribes are illegal, but not "lobbying", campaign contributions, subsidies, revolving doors, etc. Someone should make a dictionary of all the fake terms they use to describe their crimes to us.

It would be a thick volume.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Those are the top exported manufactured goods only.

Agriculture alone would rank 3rd in your list at $133 billion, but it's a raw material..not to mention beef.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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I'm wondering what is going to happen to TAFTA? Has Trump commented on that?

Some market sectors here in Europe see proposed higher duty on imports from China as a good prospect for them, opening up sectors that are currently dominated by the Chinese....



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: jacobe001
China is pro capitalist, India is too, so is Mexico.

I would like to see a minimum standard wage, environmental and worker safety standards. Then and only then when the country meets these they get access to the markets.



I think we should tear up the trade deals and only do business with Pro Capitalist Countries.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Those are the top exported manufactured goods only.

Agriculture alone would rank 3rd in your list at $133 billion, but it's a raw material..not to mention beef.


Exports/imports are by sub category, not sector, otherwise all the heavy industry would be in one block and would be significantly higher than agriculture.

All food stuffs count for roughly 11% of the overall export volume while machines are 24%. Use the H2 function to view the data.




edit on 22-12-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: Zazz 2020!



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 12:36 PM
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Hopefully he sticks to his guns on this. Gonna be rough getting it through the Republican Congress. His plan is to raise the tariff, but to also lower corporate income tax from 35% to 15% to encourage them to stop shipping jobs out of the states and at the same time, they see a benefit.



posted on Dec, 22 2016 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Okay, I'll concede that, but I think you're missing my point.

- Highly skilled labor (aircraft, aerospace and technologically advanced machining, etc.)
- Electronics (aerospace, aviation, etc.)
- Complex chemical and refining (petroleum, petrochemical and pharmaceuticals, etc.)

Are indeed 'available' elsewhere, but they're not wildly competitive markets with tons of players, and many of those players are western developed countries. Underdeveloped countries don't have these resources and are pure consumers. It's not so much a function of the product, but the process that produces them. While not "exclusive" to the US, the US does have an edge in production capacity against those who can compete.

I won't argue about auto parts, anyone can make those.

My point on the agricultural side is, we export upwards of 60% of agricultural products to countries who simply do not have the climate or real estate to produce those same products. Again, there are 'some' competitors, but none with the production capacity to keep up with World demand.

So yes, trade deals would work, bug again, they take time. Tariffs are a better short term fix, PLUS they create an incentive for solidifying those trade deals quicker. Otherwise, there's no incentive to accept those unilateral deals you suggest.

Bottom line, we need to take a much harder stance and stop trying to be 'nice' economically. Wall Street certainly isn't 'nice' to our own people (i.e. investors), in fact they're brutal. Why should we continue to give away the farm (so to speak) with exports to foreign countries? We shouldn't.




edit on 12/22/2016 by Flyingclaydisk because: Removed edit to add it as a response to another subsequent post.



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