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Man Shoots 3 cops - Found NOT Guilty

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posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 06:37 AM
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On February 19, 2015 Police in Corpus Christy Texas were serving a no knock warrant at the home of Ray Rosas. The warrant was not for him but for his nephew who was not there at the time. IMO a no knock warrant is just asking for trouble. I know that I keep a gun right next to my bed and if someone were to break in my house in early morning or late at night it is the first thing I would grab. If there is no announcement that it is police I'm naturally going to assume it is someone trying to cause harm to me or my family. He was found not guilty yesterday 12/20/16.


Ray Rosas is a free man tonight after a jury of his peers found him not guilty of shooting three Corpus Christi police officers on February 19, 2015. On that day, early in the morning, CCPD executed a no-knock search warrant, forcing entry into the home without first knocking and announcing they were the police. A flash bang grenade was fired into Rosas’ bedroom, reportedly stunning the 47-year-old, who then opened fire on the intruders. Three officers were wounded; officers Steven Ruebelmann, Steven Brown, and Andrew Jordan. Police were looking for drugs and Rosas’ nephew, who they suspected to be a dealer. However, the unnamed nephew was not home at the time of the raid.


It's amazing that no one was killed. Especially after 3 of the officers were injured. I'm glad no one was killed and hopefully a precedent has been set. If you are serving a no knock warrant and an innocent man defends his home, there is a good chance he will be found not guilty.


Rosas spent nearly 2 years in jail awaiting trial, which concluded Tuesday with a Nueces County jury finding him not guilty. Rosas’ defense maintained, based on statements he made immediately following the shooting and later in jail that he did not know the men breaking into his home were police officers and there was no way he could’ve known, having been disoriented by the flash-bang stun grenade. “The case is so easy, this is a self-defense case,” said Rosas’ lawyer in closing arguments.

Rosas originally faced three counts of attempted capital murder, but the prosecution dropped those charges just before the trial began, opting instead to try him for three counts of aggravated assault on the police officers. The jury sided with his defense attorney’s argument he had a right to defend his home and found him not guilty on all charges


2 years is a long time to be in jail waiting for a trial. The governments definition of a speedy trial differs from mine.

While I hate to see a police officer get killed or injured doing their job, I do not agree at all with no knock warrants. I'm glad this case turned out the way it did. The no-knock raids often result in officers wounded or killed or innocent people facing charges of murder or attempted murder, and frequently sees innocent citizens caught in the crossfire. They’re arguably dangerous for everyone involved, infrequently producing the desired results, and costing taxpayers millions in lawsuits, court costs, and legal fees.


Closing arguments were impassioned. The prosecution recalled testimony given by eleven police officers who described Rosas shooting at police. "Several policemen were shouting out loud as they hit the raid with the flash bang, several times. 'Police, police police!' And what they got back was gunfire," said prosecutor Joe Mike Pena The defense argued Rosas did not know he was firing at police, after SWAT actions were not carried out simultaneously and he was disoriented by a flash-bang grenade going off in his bedroom. "The case is so easy," defense attorney Lisa Greenberg said. "This is a self defense case." It was an emotional day in the courtroom. Several members of Rosas' family were present, including his elderly mother, who was present during the raid. Officer Andrew Jordan, who was shot during the raid, also sat in on the hearing.




posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 06:38 AM
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Here is some info on other relevant cases:


Rosas’ case is further evidence that the State of Texas has a very real problem on its hands and may have set a precedent for other citizens caught up in the melee of a no-knock police raid. The Castle Doctrine, the Texas law which allows for an individual to defend a person’s abode, dwelling, even vehicles with deadly force, has surely been put to the test. In Rosas’ case, it appears as though the Castle Doctrine has survived yet another legal challenge, potentially setting the precedent that not even the police have the right to invade one’s home unannounced. Tuesday’s verdict may also bring hope to others who have fallen victim to police raids, and those who have chosen to stand their ground and shoot back at their home’s invaders. One such individual is Marvin Louis Guy.

As The Free Thought Project first reported in 2014, Guy is facing the death penalty. Guy shot and killed Detective Charles Dinwiddie and injured several other Killeen police officers, as they were attempting to forcefully enter Guy’s home on May 9, 2014, at 5:30 am. Police had been surveilling Guy’s home for some time after an informant claimed Guy was trafficking a large quantity of coc aine. At some point in the investigation, the decision was made to enter Guy’s home and attempt to find evidence which would corroborate the informant’s claim.

But after entering the residence, in a show of force which resulted in the loss of life of a veteran police officer, no drugs, not even a single marijuana joint was found, only a glass smoking pipe turned up. The consequence for the police incursion resulted in one detective’s death, and a man being charged with homicide. Guy’s fate is yet to be determined, as he is awaiting trial for Dinwiddie’s murder which, arguably, would not have occurred had the police not attempted to enter his home unannounced.

Even if the police had identified themselves before attempting to enter Guy’s home, there have been enough crimes committed by criminals posing as police, to justify Guy’s decision to defend his life from intruders. With Guy already being a convicted felon, more questions will likely be raised as to whether or not the Castle doctrine can be extended to convicted felons. The weapon Guy used, a 9mm, had been reported stolen. Likewise, his possession of the weapon was also another potential felony. But the question remains. Do all Americans have a right to defend themselves? Under current Texas law, convicted felons do not have a right to keep and bear arms for the protection of their persons or dwelling. According to many jailhouse interviews conducted by KDH News, Guy told reporters “he was simply defending himself when his bedroom window was broken out that morning.”

Complicating matters further for the prosecution in Guy’s case is the fact that a precedent has already been set in a similar case. As The Free Thought Project reported, charges against Henry Goedrich Magee were dropped following a TX grand jury’s refusal to indict Magee on capital murder charges for the shooting death of Burleson County Sgt. Adam Sowders, after the sergeant led a team of police officers into Magee’s residence using the same “no-knock” search warrant method. Magee claimed he was protecting his home and his pregnant girlfriend, the exact same claim Guy made upon his arrest.

After the grand jury refused to indict Magee, the case against him was dropped, just a few short months after the shooting occurred, quite a contrast from Guy’s imprisonment. Guy has been sitting in jail for two and a half years awaiting his day in court, held under three million dollars bond.

Source
Source



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 06:48 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

I hope this sets precedent (or is it spelled president?) Sorry.....couldn't help myself.
edit on 12/21/2016 by AlbanArthur because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

GOOD !



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 06:57 AM
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justice.
no more blank checks for cops. accountability starts at the top.
the victim should not stop there. im sure during his long trial period, a lot of shoddy evidence and lies came up; i would sue the PD and city for every single wrong doing and technicality.

and if he wins the lawsuits with a big pay off, he should go on a nice "paid admin leave" at the expense of the money from the PD and the city.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 07:29 AM
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Moral of the story:

Don't kick in doors and you won't get shot.

I'm all about supporting police, but no knock raids should be illegal.

For the safety of all involved this practice should end.

Someone kicks in my door their survival isn't guaranteed either.

Some people are better equipped to deal with silly things like flashbangs than others.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

This is good news--gives hope to those of us who understand that we have the right to defend our "castle" and our family from any perceived threats, regardless if they're wearing a badge. Hell, in Indiana, they passed a law that states that if a LEO is trespassing on your property or into your home without official need to be there, you can use whatever force you normally would if you were concerned about said trespasser. I appreciate these laws, as they are designed to protect the individual's rights to property and self-protection instead of giving individuals a pass just because they have a badge.

I'm with you, though, in expressing gladitude (TM) that no one was killed, especially the homeowner or any of his family, and I go so for as to say that I'm surprised that he wasn't made into a pin cushion for bullets...I probably would have reacted that way if I were one of the LEOs on site, no knowing the details as to how it went down.

I agree that no-knock warrants present more problems than solutions, for all parties involved. I understand that they reduce the time that a bad guy inside can get to a deadly weapon, grab a hostage, flush evidence, flee out of a window, etc., but a good raid will avoid most of that when done properly. Our police departments need to do a better job at training and being reasonable with their tactics. I think that many are, but I know for a fact that many are failing in one or both of those regards.

Again, glad that no one was killed, and I hope that the officers feel a bit of pride knowing that they didn't take an innocent man's life that day.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder


If you are serving a no knock warrant and an innocent man defends his home, there is a good chance he will be found not guilty. 


Even better chance he will be found not alive.

No knock warrants need to stop. What can you expect when busting down someones door?

It's hazardous for everyone involved.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:20 AM
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This was a feel good story.
Thanks for posting.
I needed a good laugh.




posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

No-knock warrants are exceedingly stupid anywhere...but I've never understood them in Texas. The vast majority of us own at least one firearm, we know how to shoot, and we know in an intruder situation that we are in the right to use it to stop that threat. They should be smarter about things like this. He did nothing wrong, and I'm glad to hear they freed him. He shouldn't have spent even one night in lockup.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: MagicCow
This was a feel good story.
Thanks for posting.
I needed a good laugh.



What was the part you found amusing? A man losing two years of his life because of someone else's bad judgement? People being seriously injured because of it? Not really seeing the humor in this situation...I must be missing something.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

There is no justification for no-knock warrants... and therefore no excuse.

I'd like to see some police officers sue their department for using no-knock warrants and putting their lives at unnecessary risk of danger from occupants. That may be the only way it stops at this point. And this verdict may help in that regard, now that officers know they are not immune from the consequences of their actions.... and the occupant has legal precedence on his/her side.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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Two years awaiting trial? Tell me that wasn't on purpose. So, when the state sets unreasonable bail and then stalls for two years before the trial, does Texas' wrongful imprisonment compensation kick in?



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I would hope he gets something. Having to wait 2 years is BS! A right to a speedy trail is a constitutional right and I think 2 years is a violation of that right.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

2pac did the same thing, but it was 2 off-duty police officers who were harassing someone, had stolen drugs and guns from evidence and they were definitely in the wrong.

Just a bit of history that related to this story so thought I would share



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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Well if any state is gonna find this guy not guilty for protecting his home with a gun its Texas.

Like the cops in Texas dont know they could get shot doing that sh!t.

I think the cops should be charged and this guy should be able to sue.
edit on 21-12-2016 by goou111 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
Moral of the story:

Don't kick in doors and you won't get shot.

I'm all about supporting police, but no knock raids should be illegal.

For the safety of all involved this practice should end.

Someone kicks in my door their survival isn't guaranteed either.

Some people are better equipped to deal with silly things like flashbangs than others.


You are also stuck in a situation if you are armed. You are suddenly awakened by an explosion or door being kicked in, you grab your firearm......

OK, you are now armed.... regardless if it is criminal home invaders or Police, you will be killed.

Why would I now allow myself to be murdered because I have a firearm in my hand in my own damned house not knowing who just came through that door.......

What choice do you now have other than to take out the invader before they murder you?

Really, if it is the police and that is a big maybe since home invaders lately have yelled "police" when they smash in your door, but if it really is the police, they are going to murder you if you come out or they come in your room and you have a weapon. Why would you NOT defend yourself regardless if it is really police or not?

I really do not want to hurt anyone but I also do not want to be murdered by police in my own home for the crime of having a firearm in my hand to see who / what just smashed into my house.
edit on 21-12-2016 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

The part where the man didn't die or was railroaded into serving life in jail
or worse for the initial attempted manslaughter charges that were filed.
The part where although he did serve two years that he WALKED FREE.
The part where he now gets to sue the police and everyone involved for
this fiasco.
That's the part I find amusing.
Guess you did miss it.
As for the cops being injured serving out their jackboot no-knock - SERVES THEM RIGHT.
How many of these stories have we heard where cops pounce on the wrong house killing
the occupants inside and serve NO JAIL TIME?
So yes I found this story to be a feel good story.
Play stupid games and win stupid prizes.




posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:40 AM
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How are you supposed to hear them identify themselves as Police if you have just been knocked senseless by a flash bang?



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
How are you supposed to hear them identify themselves as Police if you have just been knocked senseless by a flash bang?


Yep, also Criminal home invaders now yell "Police" when kicking in doors.

Home invasion began with shout of 'police' at door
www.starnewsonline.com...

Thieves Yell “Police” Before Invading Home, Shooting and Robbing Resident
www.activistpost.com...

Texas Man Killed by Fake Cops in Home Invasion, Robbery
www.breitbart.com...



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