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Help with Stoicism

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posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 03:16 AM
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Me and philosophy, is like a pink elephant in a porcelain shop, someone the other day told me in a unique way, catch up on stoicism, so i did, but instead of my own subjective narrative on it, i would love to hear those who are used to philosophy in a "Higher Learning"..

The Pursuit of Happiness or To live a good life, one must understand the rules of the natural order, that any object, animal or man has a natural function.

So im asking for help, about what you think




posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 03:27 AM
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I've always thought of stoicism as a sort of fatalism.

The fates do what they will and the stoic just gets on with life.

Whatever happens is incidental, transient. Whether it's good or bad, life goes on so you shouldn't necessarily let an event alter the wider course of your life if you are broadly happy with its direction.



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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Stoicism is closely similar to Buddhism: what causes suffering is judgement and passions. What prevents suffering is reason and acceptance of the natural order. It's also different from it by being a much more materialistic philosophy. For Stoics, the existence is mainly corporeal, even though human life is heavily dictated by psychology. By understanding this psychology, one can direct his own existence.

It was a very popular philosophy during the Antiquity and it had a huge influence on the Western world culture and science. I suggest you read more about it because it is a very interesting rational philosophy and a great tool to go through life.
edit on 20-12-2016 by galacticgoat because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 04:45 AM
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a reply to: galacticgoat

Any sources you can advise to?



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 04:56 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Meditations

Marcus Aurelius is probably an easy to read introduction to Stoicism as a philosophy of life before moving on to Seneca and Epictetus
edit on 20-12-2016 by galacticgoat because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

I see those as different things.

One is more like you can't be emotional about what has happened or about the things you can't change that are.

The other is you shouldn't be emotional about anything, because nothing is changeable.




edit on 20-12-2016 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang



Stoicism
, or remaining stoic (calm) is to, for all appearances, be removed emotionally from what is occurring around you.

Lots of people appear indifferent but are seething inside. Covering up ones emotions isn't the true definition of stoicism. Remaining calm in the storm is different than appearing to remain calm.

.02



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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For me, Marcus Aurelius is the end and the beginning for stoicism...
I own a very old copy of the book and a coin from his rule...

The key to knowing this most contemplative of ethos is to research its master, the great philosopher king...

Aurelius is a hero of mine and I bid u well on a journey to understanding the wisdom of those upon whom western civilization was built...

Marcus reperesented the light that was Rome...
Light which can brighten or burn...thus the the duality of enlightenment...pun intended

-Chris



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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"There is no 'good' or 'bad' there just "is"...



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

I tend to follow a Stoic path Philosophically. SO what is your issue?



posted on Dec, 20 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

What is your opinion?



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: Noinden

Are you familiar with biology, neuro- chemistry, etc etc..

I have a couple of questions.. preferable in PM



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

PM me
You have an open invitation, I will PM my email if you'd prefer that.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

My opinion of Stoicism? I see it as a logical philosophy. My own brand is not the classical version, but close enough.



posted on Dec, 23 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang
“The Tender Compassion of Our God”: Close to Jehovah

What Is Compassion?

3. What is the meaning of the Hebrew verb rendered “show mercy” or “have pity”?

3 In the Bible, there is a close relationship between compassion and mercy. A number of Hebrew and Greek words convey the sense of tender compassion. Consider, for example, the Hebrew verb ra·chamʹ, which is often rendered “show mercy” or “have pity.” One reference work explains that the verb ra·chamʹ “expresses a deep and tender feeling of compassion, such as is aroused by the sight of weakness or suffering in those that are dear to us or need our help.” This Hebrew term, which Jehovah applies to himself, is related to the word for “womb” and can be described as “motherly compassion.”*—Exodus 33:19; Jeremiah 33:26.
...
4, 5. How does the Bible use the feelings that a mother has for her baby to teach us about Jehovah’s compassion?

4 The Bible uses the feelings that a mother has for her baby to teach us about the meaning of Jehovah’s compassion. At Isaiah 49:15, we read: “Can a woman forget her nursing child, that she should not have compassion [ra·chamʹ] on the son of her womb? Yes, they may forget, yet I will not forget you.” (The Amplified Bible) That touching description underscores the depth of Jehovah’s compassion for his people. ...
...
The tender compassion that Jehovah has for his servants is unfailing. It is immeasurably stronger than the most tender natural feeling that we can imagine—the compassion that a mother normally feels for her infant child. Little wonder that one commentator said of Isaiah 49:15: “This is one of the strongest, if not the strongest expression of God’s love in the Old Testament.”

6. Many imperfect humans have viewed tender compassion in what way, but of what does Jehovah assure us?

6 Is tender compassion a sign of weakness? Many imperfect humans have held that view. For instance, the Roman philosopher Seneca, who was a contemporary of Jesus and a leading intellectual figure in Rome, taught that “pity is a weakness of the mind.” Seneca was an advocate of Stoicism, a philosophy stressing calmness that is devoid of feeling. A wise person may help those in distress, said Seneca, but he must not allow himself to feel pity, for such a feeling would deprive him of serenity. That self-centered view of life allowed no room for heartfelt compassion. But that is not at all what Jehovah is like! In his Word, Jehovah assures us that he “is very tender in affection and compassionate.” (James 5:11, footnote) As we will see, compassion is not a weakness but a strong, vital quality.
...

My compassion for you and others here compels me to warn everyone not to poison their hearts and minds with stoicism (not talking about mere superficial research). That decision of course remains up to whoever reads this. I hope the bolded information above might help make that decision (also see my signature and description under my name if the penny hasn't dropped yet).

Oh, btw, from wikipedia:

He [Seneca] was a tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero.

A great fire ravaged Rome in 64 C.E., destroying about a fourth of the city. The rumor circulated that Nero was responsible and, according to Roman historian Tacitus, Nero tried to protect himself by placing the blame on the Christians. (The Annals, XV, XLIV) Mass arrests followed, and Christians as well as those suspected of being Christians were tortured, put to death in large numbers, some even being burned alive in public. This appears to have marked the start of a great wave of persecution, not from religious opposers, but from political sources bent on exterminating the Christian congregation.
edit on 23-12-2016 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2016 @ 04:47 AM
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My Idea of Stocisim is that it represents the old adage of Having the wisdom to know what can be changed and what cannot. I see so much to annoy me but what good does that achieve. Somethings I can contribute to changing and other things I cannot.

Prime Example no 1

Stopping a Trump victory. Trump won. What now Gt Over it! I gave it a shot and did not change it. The Upside is the sky has not fallen. A weak candidate lost (Hilary). To go after Trump's election win now is foolish. Howevr 2020 awaits!







 
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