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Thyroid cancer compensation for Fukushima plant worker

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posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 04:05 AM
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A man who developed thyroid gland cancer after working at the stricken Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant has for the first time won the right to work-related compensation.

While the case ranks as the third time a worker at the Fukushima plant has been recognized as eligible for work-related compensation because of cancer caused by radiation exposure, it is the first instance involving thyroid gland cancer.

SOURCE


I'm posting this for those who may still believe that the radiation emanating from Fukushima Daiichi isn't harmful. Believe it or not, there still appears to be some who believe that after all these years.

Please consider the following.


Cancer of the thyroid is more common in women than in men. Most patients are between 25 and 65 years old. People who have been exposed to large amounts of radiation, or who have had radiation treatment for medical problems in the head and neck have a higher chance of getting thyroid cancer. The cancer may not occur until 20 years or longer after radiation treatment.

SOURCE


Apparently thyroid cancer takes a long time to develop. The Fukushima disaster happened less than six years ago. Some people believe that there will be an epidemic of cancers that will develop in the coming years. This could be one of the first signs that it's happening.




posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


This guy was working "inside" the powerplant. It's dangerous inside there.
Start showing us the cancer rate increases from cities 20 miles away.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Start showing us the cancer rate increases from cities 20 miles away.
Who said there were cancer increases in cities 20 miles away? You don't have to be working inside a nuclear plant to have increased cancer risk if there's a disaster, as Chernobyl showed us.

It took the WHO 20 years to make the following report on Chernobyl health effects and if they follow the same timeline for Fukushima you'll see their report 20 years after the disaster in 2031.

Health effects of the Chernobyl accident: an overview April 2006

Thyroid cancer

A large increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer has occurred among people who were young children and adolescents at the time of the accident and lived in the most contaminated areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. This was due to the high levels of radioactive iodine released from the Chernobyl reactor in the early days after the accident.
The increase in thyroid cancer is probably specifically attributable to Chernobyl, but for other types of cancers the correlation isn't so clear.

The WHO says people exposed to the radiation aren't living as long because they are getting more of other types of cancers earlier, and maybe it's because they are drinking and smoking more, suggesting the possibility that the shortened lifespan could be due to factors other than radiation, but they haven't ruled out radiation as the cause either:


An increased number of cancer deaths can be expected during the lifetime of persons exposed to radiation from the accident. Since it is currently impossible to determine which individual cancers were caused by radiation, the number of such deaths can only be estimated statistically using information and projections from the studies of atomic bomb survivors and other highly exposed populations. It should be noted that the atomic bomb survivors received high radiation doses in a short time period, while Chernobyl caused low doses over a long time. This and other factors, such as trying to estimate doses people received some time after the accident, as well as differences in lifestyle and nutrition, cause very large uncertainties when making projections about future cancer deaths. In addition, a significant non-radiation related reduction in the average lifespan in the three countries over the past 15 years caused by overuse of alcohol and tobacco, and reduced health care, have significantly increased the difficulties in detecting any effect of radiation on cancer mortality.
So I can't tell you what the WHO report on Fukushima health effects in 2031 will say, but you can read their report on the Chernobyl health effects now.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur


Lots of different issues with chernobyl that fukishima.
Russia didn't have any containment built into theirs.
Japan did.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: Arbitrageur


Lots of different issues with chernobyl that fukishima.
Russia didn't have any containment built into theirs.
Japan did.
The containment at Fukushima didn't prevent huge amounts of radiation from being released into the atmosphere, and the failed containment is still leaking radiation even today. Japan attempted to build an ice wall as a means of containment but they admit it's still leaking.

The buildings were one of the layers designed to contain the radioactivity and some of them exploded. Anyway nobody is saying the death tolls will be identical, but the reason for bringing up Chernobyl is to show that it took two decades for the WHO to write the health report and even then the report says long term health effects like increased cancer rates are still sure to occur for decades after the 20 year report. I'm sure the Fukushima report in 2031 will have similar language about long term effects being difficult to determine, even though the exact numbers of deaths will be different because of some of the differences you mention.


edit on 20161217 by Arbitrageur because: clarification




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