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All Navy F-18 variants grounded after Whidbey Island NAS accident

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posted on Dec, 16 2016 @ 08:44 PM
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An accident this morning that involved a Squadron 132 F/A-18G Growler has injured two crew members and caused the announcement of a fleet wide suspension of flight ops that involve all F-18 variants. The two injured crew members were airlifted to Harbor View medical center in Seattle. If they went to Harbor View, the extent of the injuries are most likely on the rather bad side. Harbor View is the regions only level one trauma center. The aircraft involved was also reported to be damaged in the accident.

Boeing is being brought in to consult on the incident.

www.navy.mil...

www.goskagit.com...


edit on 16-12-2016 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-12-2016 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 16 2016 @ 08:52 PM
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It has to be a systemic issue with a common component. I can only think of a few things that would cause serious injuries and require grounding.



posted on Dec, 16 2016 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Possible fuel or hydrolic system explosion? Local news is supposed to release an update on the crew members condition later tonight.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 12:06 AM
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That include RAAF Superbugs?



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

No, only the US, but I'm sure all operators will be kept updated.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 01:03 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

It's got to be in something that's common to both the Growler and Rhino, or they think it is anyway.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Both pilots are said to have been critically injured.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 02:37 AM
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Oil in oxygen system go bang?Prayers for the crew..



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 07:05 PM
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A report today said the canopy was involved.



posted on Dec, 19 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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Interesting comments today. Boeing and NAVAIR have identified several potential contributing factors. Once squadrons brief them and changes in procedure to aircraft washing and NATOPS they can begin flying again.

www.navytimes.com...
edit on 12/19/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Hmmm, someone got a little over zealous with the power washer near the charges for the canopy maybe.

Haven't heard any update on the pilot and EWO's conditions yet.
edit on 19-12-2016 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Other than the I've report that night I haven't seen anything on them besides the usual "condition unknown" remarks.

With it involving washing, that pretty much narrows it down to the charges. They're the only thing I can think of that would be affected AND injure both pilots.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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Wow, really did not see this one coming. The crew was troubleshooting a pressurization issue at the time of the incident. The pressure relief valve for the cockpit failed, and there was a serious over pressure problem going on. It eventually got so bad, that the canopy failed, causing the crew injuries.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Amazing how something so small and so simple can cause a multi-million dollar machine to fail. Then I think of your last post on Allegient(My parents favorite go to) and cars look better and better. Those 2 are lucky to have escaped with their lives.

The canopy failing is interesting to me. Was the pressure too low or too high? A canopy failing inward seems the least likely but I am left wanting for more details on it.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

It was an overpressure event. The canopy would have essentially exploded.



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

They're lucky.. Very lucky. Any news on fleet grounding? Is the issue considered fleet wide now or is it as simple as a maintenance issue?



posted on Dec, 21 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

They've implemented a change to wash procedures, and NATOPS that once briefed, the unit can begin flying again.



posted on Jan, 5 2017 @ 07:34 PM
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The initial report is that the accident may have been caused by frigid weather after the aircraft was washed.



posted on Jan, 6 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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The crew is still in the hospital and are listed as stable, but no other details have been released.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 06:28 PM
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A few more details have emerged. The crew was apparently troubleshooting an environmental issue prior to takeoff. They were to fly with two other Growlers that day. There was a rapid pressure increase, followed by the canopy letting go. There were to PJs from the 304th Rescue Squadron in Portland on base at the time that treated the crew before the ambulance arrived. One crew member suffered a significant head injury, while the other suffered lung damage and was described as suffocating. They repeatedly decompressed his chest until they got to the hospital.

One crew member has been released, the other is looking at another couple of weeks in the hospital before he may be released. The aftermath was described as "horrific".

www.thedrive.com...



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