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Recognising And Raising Educational Standards In British Policing

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posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 04:38 AM
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Policing is complicated.

Imagine the number of different scenarios that might require the attention of the constables. The job itself is an education like no other.

Many police are already highly educated, now they will be recognised.

www.college.police.uk...

We have incredibly hardworking and dedicated employees across policing who are working at a graduate level now. But they're not getting the same recognition that people in other professions benefit from.

Benefits like not being treated like a thick cop, but more in the manner of an educated expert.


Entry to the police service will also change. Beyond 2020, there will be three available options:

◾a police constable degree apprenticeship paid for by the force, allowing individuals to obtain a policing degree and earn while they learn
◾a specific policing degree as seen in other professions
◾for graduates, a graduate programme which will also be paid for by the police force

Our plans will future-proof policing so that, as it becomes more complex, officers will be accredited to the appropriate standard. Regardless of which force they're in, they'll know that their skills and knowledge match those of colleagues elsewhere in the country.


There is a case for allowing some leeway.

www.policeprofessional.com...

PFEW General Secretary Andy Fittes welcomed the decision to move away from minimum education requirements, adding that there “is a balance to be struck” around encouraging education and marginalising good quality candidates.


Those who have felt unrecognised will feel happier having their educational achievements appreciated.

The new recruits will be of a higher educational standard. They should be much more savvy as to the use of police as a political tool and the undesirable long term consequences.

The only problem I can see with this is trying to argue your way out of something with an educated copper.
edit on 15 12 2016 by Kester because: (no reason given)

edit on 15 12 2016 by Kester because: idiot




posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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a reply to: Kester

All well and good but the fundamental working practices for UK Policing are so flawed why anyone educated or not would go into the profession is beyond me.

My work brings me into contact with a wide range of Police departments from Traffic to British Transport Police and everything inbetween moral is rock bottom, I know of many officers that will turn a blind eye due to the threat of political consequences. A officer has to make a split second decision only for a ambulance chasing solicitor to use every avenue after a 2 year fact find to try and stitch them up for compo, I have seen it time and time again, and more often than not the officer is thrown under the bus by the force "to make the problem go away"..

All well and good wanting a higher educated officer and with the current work and wage situation in the UK certain people will always look at policing as a option but at the end of it will it actually give the public a "good copper" or will you end up with someone that fills a uniform??..

The really smart Police officers have jumped ship, I have seen many public funded departments fill up with people leaving the force. What does that tell you..


RA



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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I live in the Devon and Cornwall constabulary area, they are chilled as #, the biggest geographical police area in England, vastly outnumbered, they turn a blind eye to allsorts when communities 'police' ourselves, and are often grateful for assistance.
I wouldn't change our cops for the world, decent people doing a #ty job.



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 06:14 AM
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I'm a former Police officer who joined back in 1990.

In those days we still Policed the old fashioned way, firm but fair and the majority of officers treated people how they would expect to be treated themselves.

During this period, new recruits that held a law degree would be considered for SIPS (Structured internal Fast Track Promotion Scheme). However by early 2000, a huge number of recruits held degrees and sadly, were destined to become normal everyday constables with little chance of promotion unless they themselves took the initiative to take the Sergeants exam.

I fail to see how raising the standard of applicants to degree standard will offer recognition to anyone. It will just become the norm and with Police starting salaries already at an all time low, I see no financial benefit either.


edit on 15-12-2016 by studio500 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 06:20 AM
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My daughter is in her final year of her policing degree. Its hard. It covers so much such as forensic psychology, CSI, interview techniques and a whole lot more. You would have thought she would have some advantage having the knowledge already, but has been told now after work experience with a police service nr Uni that she is still not guaranteed a job has to jump through the same hoops as everyone else and there is no promotion guarantee simply because she has the degree...so she's joining the Army
and now feels she's totally wasted 2yrs studying for something that's completely pointless



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 06:21 AM
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So basically to become a police officer in the future you will need to have a degree?
Not only that, the police will pay for it!

I thought the police are already short of funds as it is, I hope they get extra funding to pay for all these apprenticeships/conversion courses which will be required.


All this just so the police officers 'get more respect'.

I'm sorry but you don't get respect just because you went to university, you get respect because of your actions and how well you do your job to the public.



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 06:32 AM
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originally posted by: slider1982
a reply to: Kester

My work brings me into contact with a wide range of Police departments from Traffic to British Transport Police and everything inbetween moral is rock bottom, I know of many officers that will turn a blind eye due to the threat of political consequences. A officer has to make a split second decision only for a ambulance chasing solicitor to use every avenue after a 2 year fact find to try and stitch them up for compo, I have seen it time and time again, and more often than not the officer is thrown under the bus by the force "to make the problem go away"..

RA


I totally agree about current morale too. It is at rock bottom with many officers now being overworked and underpaid.
Pensions have been ravaged, working hours are longer and more gruelling, Targets are disguised as "Performance indicators", whereby if you don't make enough arrests or issue enough process (Tickets), you are hauled in front of a supervisor to explain why.

On my old division a Constable used to be engaged in all aspects of policing and I mean all. Today many officers are given almost singular roles, i.e Prisoner handling teams, shoplifting team, enquiry officers etc which only creates monotony.

If I were young again today, I would never join the Police Service in its current state and they could kiss my A$$ if they expected me to obtain a degree for the privilege.

Remember, Police officers in the UK cannot go on strike. They have to rely on the Police Union to negotiate, These unions once had a degree of power but today they stand as toothless lions allowing the average officer to continue to be shafted by the Force and everyone they serve.



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: studio500

originally posted by: slider1982
a reply to: Kester

My work brings me into contact with a wide range of Police departments from Traffic to British Transport Police and everything inbetween moral is rock bottom, I know of many officers that will turn a blind eye due to the threat of political consequences. A officer has to make a split second decision only for a ambulance chasing solicitor to use every avenue after a 2 year fact find to try and stitch them up for compo, I have seen it time and time again, and more often than not the officer is thrown under the bus by the force "to make the problem go away"..

RA


I totally agree about current morale too. It is at rock bottom with many officers now being overworked and underpaid.
Pensions have been ravaged, working hours are longer and more gruelling, Targets are disguised as "Performance indicators", whereby if you don't make enough arrests or issue enough process (Tickets), you are hauled in front of a supervisor to explain why.

On my old division a Constable used to be engaged in all aspects of policing and I mean all. Today many officers are given almost singular roles, i.e Prisoner handling teams, shoplifting team, enquiry officers etc which only creates monotony.

If I were young again today, I would never join the Police Service in its current state and they could kiss my A$$ if they expected me to obtain a degree for the privilege.

Remember, Police officers in the UK cannot go on strike. They have to rely on the Police Union to negotiate, These unions once had a degree of power but today they stand as toothless lions allowing the average officer to continue to be shafted by the Force and everyone they serve.


A sobering fact is the Met, Starting Salary is dismal and you have to pay for the application exam. You can earn over 10k more just being a ticket inspector for Transport for London who pay I believe £38k starting with full pension and all the trimmings, you could work for the Underground on a gate line for £35k or drive a train for the Overground with a second year salary of £56k...

Also the actual training is below the standard it use to be, Hendon which was the main Met Police training facility was closed and officers went from having a intensive residential course to what is considered to be a total joke of more or less 9-5 distance learning with on road trainers. This was all due to cut backs and I believe the land that the training center was on being sold off..

The quality of current Met officers is NOT what it once was, and you can blame cut back after cut back for it....


RA
edit on 15-12-2016 by slider1982 because: sp



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
I live in the Devon and Cornwall constabulary area, they are chilled as #, the biggest geographical police area in England, vastly outnumbered, they turn a blind eye to allsorts when communities 'police' ourselves, and are often grateful for assistance.
I wouldn't change our cops for the world, decent people doing a #ty job.


I was raised on the borders of Devon and Cornwall. We used to sit on the banks of the Tamar watching the ox-carts crossing the ford to delivery boxes of elecktrickery to the Cornish. We had one of the last true local bobbies, with his own little police station the size of a garden shed in the middle of the nearby village.

He was also my best friend's father, which came in useful when we were up to mischief. "Chilled as #" is a great description, but they got a bit arsey when they started to centralise things. When he retired, we ended up with coppers coming in from the outside. Didn't know anyone, always getting lost, constantly irritated by us country-folk.

Not entirely sure what this has to do with the thread, but fond memories none the less!



posted on Dec, 15 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

Haha cool story


...and definitely on-topic because police constabularies vary wildly in the UK.

I'm from south Wales originally and Heddlu De Cymru constabulary are dressed and act like stormtroopers compared to Devon and Cornwall!
D&C even call them in for certain raids.
Hit first and ask questions afterwards lol.




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