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Supermassive Black Hole Spaghettifies Star

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posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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Initially, scientists classified ASASSN-15lh as a superluminous supernova — indeed, the most luminous seen yet. However, researchers now think this explosion may actually have been the death throes of a star ripped apart by a supermassive black hole up to billions of times the mass of the sun.

A number of factors suggested that ASASSN-15lh was not a superluminous supernova. For instance, it occurred in a large, reddish galaxy, "a location where we should not find superluminous supernovae," said lead study author Giorgos Leloudas...
...
Instead, the researchers suggest that ASASSN-15lh may have been caused by a star disintegrating under the gravitational pull of a black hole — a so-called tidal disruption event. The composition of the elements seen in the explosion are more consistent with a tidal disruption event of a low-mass star than with a superluminous supernova, Leloudas said.
...
Prior work found that the supermassive black hole at the center of ASASSN-15lh's galaxy was so big that it would have swallowed a star whole instead of ripping it apart. Using new models, Leloudas and his colleagues have discovered that a rapidly whirling supermassive black hole could rend a star to pieces instead of gulping it down whole.

Space.com, Dec. 12, 2016 - 'Brightest Supernova Ever' Was Actually Monster Black Hole's Violent Star Slashing.

The supermassive black hole was spinning and the star was orbiting the drain. Instead of a direct hit the star's material whips around (like the gravitational sling shot of a satellite around a planet) the spinning black hole only to meet itself being ripped apart in the front! The gas is travelling fast enough to light the whole lot up which is why they originally thought it was a superluminous supernova.

They need to make a model and do some computations to verify this is what happened to star (determine how massive the black hole is, how fast it is spinning, etc). Other teams will probably verify the theory and that the data matches the theory... which is how science is done.

Nice to see that we are still discovering new galactic events never before imagined. I think they may have realized that black holes have a kind of personality. And they have never seen this before so where a little caught off guard.

Do you think that their new explanation is correct? Is this neat even if you are not a cosmologist?

Anyway, I like space and thought this was a cool story and had to share!




posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:10 PM
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Only about 10 tidal disruption events have been discovered, the researchers said. This new finding may demonstrate that "tidal disruption events show a much larger diversity than what we knew before, and that they can reach extreme luminosities," Leloudas said.

(same source)

Forgot the important part! (D'oh!)



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Thanks for posting that T,

What a terrifiying event to be a witness to.

Energy releases of that scale are almost unimaginable



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


The explosion, named ASASSN-15lh, happened about 3.8 billion light-years from Earth, in the sky at the border of the southern constellations Indus and Tucana, and gave off about 570 billion times more light than the sun does at its peak.

That's bright , and to think when it happened Earth was just a baby.

Cool find mate , the Universe can be as brutal as any wildlife documentary , spaghettification must be every Stars nightmare.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Like I said, thought it was a neat story and think others would think likewise.

Going out in a true blaze of glory! I think they said it is still ongoing (hot) but they realized that it was not a supernova and had to create a new explanation. The superluminal supernovas appear to always throw scientists for a loop because they are unimaginable!

 


Here is another version (Language Warning. And, full disclosure, yeah, it where I borrowed/stole the title from. Would have been the OP except for the language!]

Inverse.com - That's No Supernova: A Spinning Supermassive Black Hole "Spaghettified" A Star.

The sentence made do double take! (Says as Nigel Tufnel), "They can't print that!"



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:33 PM
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Star and flag for an awesome non-political post.

It's awesome ( and a bit scary ) to think about how little we actually know about the universe around us.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
Do you think that their new explanation is correct?
Thanks for sharing, nice find. Anything that releases that much energy is a truly amazing facet of nature, whatever it is.

I object to their use of the word "spaghettification" because that's what a stellar mass black hole does to objects falling into it and this isn't a stellar mass black hole, it's a supermassive black hole which doesn't do that. When I started reading the article I remember wondering how they can not know that but near the end I found they DO know that:


Prior work found that the supermassive black hole at the center of ASASSN-15lh's galaxy was so big that it would have swallowed a star whole instead of ripping it apart.
That's correct because gravitational spaghettification doesn't occur with supermassive black holes, which also means the first artist's conception in the link showing something like that is probably wrong, but the second illustration is probably much closer. The first illustration wouldn't seem to apply at all to this case so they probably shouldn't be showing that at all, that's what would happen with a much less massive black hole.


Using new models, Leloudas and his colleagues have discovered that a rapidly whirling supermassive black hole could rend a star to pieces instead of gulping it down whole.
That's entirely possible, but again I wouldn't call that spaghettification, it sounds more like "shredding", or invent a new term more descriptive than spaghettification, if it's not spaghettification and it sounds like a different effect.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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What I wonder when reading of events like this, is if any intelligent life (that wasn't advanced enough to leave) was wiped out on the planet(s) surrounding the star.

I wonder how much advance notice you'd get?



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: gortex


There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio than are dreamt of in your philosophy

a reply to: cynicalheathen

Thanks! Yeah, the whole red vs blue is getting old. Go supermassive black hole instead!

a reply to: Arbitrageur

Yeah, sorry for the click-bait thread title! You are correct that the spaghetti thing is matter falling into the black hole not being re-whipped around to meet yourself again. Maybe “spaghetti-O’d”?! LOL

a reply to: carewemust

There is a black hole at the center of the Milky Way. If a star goes in and the x-ray center is aimed directly at us… that is really scary!
edit on 13-12-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: formatting and corrections



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

As it wasn't in a Galaxy I guess the Star was Free-floating so probably didn't have planets , if it did they would have shared its fate but what a way to go.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: gortex

It was also the center of the galaxy which is usually a active, lively place with lots of solar radiation so I do not think that life would really take hold. Then again, I am not a cosmology student just an arm chair one.

But still, I would not want to be around when it went off! I like being in a different galaxy a few billion years after the fact.




posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 03:48 PM
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Here is an animated simulation posted on youtube!

ETA: This is for ASASSN-15. The view on the right is a view from the side. The one on the left is straight on.


edit on 13-12-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: more info



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

LOL. That simulation was so simple that it went completely over my head! Should I have put on my headset to hear narration?



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

I did not hear any narration. And this is happening on a massive scale. It looks simple but it is the star being torn apart. You cannot see the black hole--that would have been nice just to see the rotation.

So a stream of the star falls toward the black hole and is whipped around several times. When the ends connect up you get the explosion.

I think seeing a star pulled apart like a ball of yarn is pretty crazy.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


Any idea how long that event took, from start to finish? Probably longer than that 50-second animation, eh?



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
What I wonder when reading of events like this, is if any intelligent life (that wasn't advanced enough to leave) was wiped out on the planet(s) surrounding the star.

I wonder how much advance notice you'd get?


I wonder what era we'd be transported back to... What if we fell asleep tonight, got sucked into a black hole, miraculously survived as a whole planet, and woke up to Jurassic times outside...



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: LSU0408

Wasn't a black hole involved in that move 2 years ago, where this astronaut returned home and his 12 year-old daughter had become an old lady on her death bed. He was only gone for a couple of months. That movie was boring at first, then it went quickly over my head, and ended on a very emotional heart-tugging note.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

Sounds like a George Noory guest



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: carewemust


Instead of cooling down over time as supernovas are supposed to do, "this object, after 100 days, started warming up again, and stayed hot at a constant and very high temperature for a long time, and it continues to do so," he said

space.com article

Sounds like (to me at least) it is still happening. It already did happen but the light is getting to us now... Gah! I hate it when things get all timesy-whimesy!

The initial explosion that they detected happened in June of last year. The thing did not cool down as expected hence the revisit to the data and time to find a new model. They said it may take a couple years but since this was not thought possible before (being shredded apart instead of one tiny, bite size gulp) it is anybody's guess.

ETA: The are going to point Hubble at ASASSN-15th next, February.
edit on 13-12-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: more info



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: gortex


According to Krzysztof Stanek of Ohio State University, one of the principal investigators at ASAS-SN, "If it was in our own galaxy, it would shine brighter than the full moon; there would be no night, and it would be easily seen during the day."[

Wikipedia: ASASSN-15lh.

Wow these scales and the amount of power given off are hard to fathom!


edit on 13-12-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: stoopid autocorrect




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