It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is zero a number???

page: 1
9
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 09:45 AM
link   
num·ber 1.
an arithmetical value, expressed by a word, symbol, or figure, representing a particular quantity and used in counting and making calculations and for showing order in a series or for identification.... The question is simple, based upon this context meaning, is zero a number?




posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 09:47 AM
link   
Yes



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 09:50 AM
link   
a reply to: auto3000

We adopted it as a number for ease of explanation. I believe zero could best be summed up as a placeholder in its' truest form.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 09:53 AM
link   
a reply to: auto3000

Lets say,

If you're born on the 30th?

Then may this be thread ?

.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 09:59 AM
link   
How is it a number if it holds no value, a number holds value.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:00 AM
link   
Quite obviously yes.



Zero is a number; in fact, it is a real number. It is on the number line right between 1 and -1. You can add, subtract, and multiply with 0 and get real answers. You can divide numbers into zero and get a real answer, zero.

You can't say anything like that about infinity. It is not on the number line and you can't do computations with it.

Now, consider 1/0. You know that 1/1 =1, 1/0.1 = 10, 1/0.01 = 100, 1/0.001 = 1000, etc... Pick a power of 10 as large as you want and I can find a number larger than 0 that I can divide into 1 and get your number as a result.

In other words, as we divide numbers into 1 and those numbers get closer and closer to 0, the quotient gets larger and larger with no boundary. We conclude then, that 1/0 = infinity.

However, that is just a shorthand notation. Actually, division by zero is undefined. It is more precise to say that Limit 1/x = oo As x gets closer to zero, the value of 1/x x->0 grows without bound (i.e., approaches infinity)

Unfortunately, often people will use the shorthand, without making it clear that this is what's going on. So other people see what they've written, and think that '1/0 = infinity' is an actual statement of fact, when it's not.

In the same way, people will often write '1/infinity = 0', instead of the more precise Limit 1/x = 0 As x grows without bound (i.e., approaches x->oo infinity), the value of 1/x gets closer to 0.

But '1/infinity = 0' is also untrue.

For more about dividing by zero, see the Dr. Math FAQ:

Dividing by Zero
mathforum.org...



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:11 AM
link   
What is the value of zero? Whatever you make it? Whatever your want it to be? So it works like a decimal? A place holder? In binary code zero is a character.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:19 AM
link   
Zero is all numbers combined so technically it is a number, all of them.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:23 AM
link   
a reply to: TAECOLE7

10 holds value, it's 1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1

Romans used numerals simply because IV is 4 and using IIII would begin to get silly.

It's quite the brilliant number and needs to be used in context to attain it's value.

For instance 40 means 4 sets of 10. The decimal point can define it's meaning. 40.01 would mean no value is held in the tenths but the 1 means a value is held in the hundredths. So, 40.01 is 40 and 1 hundredth.

Does zero have a value?

That depends on context, alone it doesn't but then that isn't taking into account the context it's being used. Temperature for instance, 0 Celsius is a value on it's scale, a measure of energy.

Confused yet?

I am and I didn't even mention Kelvins.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:27 AM
link   

originally posted by: TAECOLE7
What is the value of zero? Whatever you make it? Whatever your want it to be? So it works like a decimal? A place holder? In binary code zero is a character.


Not sure what you are confused about...

1) the value of zero is 0.
2) it's physical and inherent value resides precisely at the mid point between -1 and +1 on the continuum.
3) It is the numerical expression of the concept of none.
4) It can be written as 0.0, if you wish.

There is nothing really mysterious about it at all.

How would you answer this puzzle?

You have a basket full of apples. You take the apples out, one at a time, counting them as you go. When you have taken the last apple out, you declare that there were 87 apples in the basket. How many apples are now in the basket?

edit on 11-12-2016 by mobiusmale because: typo



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:27 AM
link   
a reply to: TAECOLE7

In that context you could as well say 0 is up 1 is down. Or yes and no respectively.

So yeah, zero usually needs an assigned value or is it value with reference?



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:28 AM
link   
Well, it is one less than one so it should be considered a number. Two less than one is a negative one. You cannot go negative in a vaccum technically, so I feel that maybe negative numbers don't really exist in reality, we only gave a definition to situations where there was an imbalance or deficiency. Negative numbers are just a reference point, they really do not exist.

Except in schools and a society that teaches they exist.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: LumenImagoDei
Zero is all numbers combined so technically it is a number, all of them.


Maybe it would be clearer to say that the sum of all Integers, or Real Numbers, equals zero.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:35 AM
link   
0 Is Awesome And True....

I Have 0 Dollars And No One Will Credit Me Anything. I Am Officially Dead To The World. When I Get Money.... I Shall Return Like A Born Again Jesus!



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 10:43 AM
link   

originally posted by: rickymouse
Well, it is one less than one so it should be considered a number. Two less than one is a negative one. You cannot go negative in a vaccum technically, so I feel that maybe negative numbers don't really exist in reality, we only gave a definition to situations where there was an imbalance or deficiency. Negative numbers are just a reference point, they really do not exist.

Except in schools and a society that teaches they exist.


Well, conducting oneself in a manner that produces a sub-zero amount can have real life consequences...

1) If I write a cheque for an amount greater than what I have in the bank (and if I have overdraft protection), I will have to deposit some more real "positive dollars" into my account just to get back to zero again.
2) If I am flying a plane, go into a dive, and don't pull out before my altimeter reads zero...

Negative numbers are indeed a reference point to something, or can be negative relative to some position or condition...but as we all know "everything is relative."



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 11:01 AM
link   
a reply to: mobiusmale

But doesn't zero imply the absence of a number? Don't we use it more as a designation?



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 11:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: TAECOLE7

10 holds value, it's 1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1

Romans used numerals simply because IV is 4 and using IIII would begin to get silly.

It's quite the brilliant number and needs to be used in context to attain it's value.
.


You forgot to mention the Romans didn't have zero.

Ten didn't mean 10 with a zero.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 11:55 AM
link   
a reply to: imitator

Yeah I was aiming at making the point Romans converted multiples into symbols, even they required the knowledge I was 1 and X was 10 to work out IX was 9.

It begins to get silly with high numbers like 3647295642...

That being said so can ours the more accurate we use math to measure.

Oh I get you now... They had a word for nothing though. Our system only requires ten digits, I think the Mayan was 20.



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 11:59 AM
link   
There are imaginary numbers but 0 is not of them. that has to do with square roots of negative numbers and i



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 12:27 PM
link   
a reply to: auto3000

go ask one of the greatest civilizations in engineering and architecture.... the Romans.



new topics

top topics



 
9
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join