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Confused Truther physics with regards to Aircraft & Building impacts.

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posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: pteridine

What did you expect it to do?


Given there wasn't enough energy in the collapsing part to overcome the resistance of the bottom part, the collapse should have undergone deceleration.

And this deceleration would not be uniform either, given that a collapsing structure is a chaotic system, we would expect the plot to be all over the place.

In essence you would expect roughly the North tower collapse to come to a halt at around floor 60-70 and the south Tower collapse to cease all together at roughly around floor 38 through 48.


edit on 17-12-2016 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

The value of g is not negative.



www.physicsclassroom.com...
In the first equation above, g is referred to as the acceleration of gravity. Its value is 9.8 m/s2 on Earth. That is to say, the acceleration of gravity on the surface of the earth at sea level is 9.8 m/s2.


I also used 9.8m/s^2 by labeling it as acceleration due to gravity.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: Korg Trinity

originally posted by: neutronflux

You might want to refresh on your basic physics, because you just made a mistake out of simple ignorance trying to be cute.



WoooW!

This will make my colleges chuckle


Thanks for the advice... I'll look into that one

an acceleration of one G UPWARDS is a positive value.... oppsee your mistake...



Just so this cherry is not forgotten........



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux

originally posted by: Korg Trinity

originally posted by: neutronflux

You might want to refresh on your basic physics, because you just made a mistake out of simple ignorance trying to be cute.



WoooW!

This will make my colleges chuckle


Thanks for the advice... I'll look into that one

an acceleration of one G UPWARDS is a positive value.... oppsee your mistake...



Just so this cherry is not forgotten........


WoooW


You must be one of the flatliners... I like you, you make me smile


The best part about this conversation is I just know I'm talking to someone who doesn't know the difference between what the book told them and reality...

We are talking about an acceleration DOWNWARD so the value should be a negative... this is universally understood. Sure you can omit the negation... or you could (negate the negation lol), people will still understand you.

But strictly speaking when we are talking about a body that is accelerating in three dimensional space, its a good idea to add the negation as it is just neater....

You wouldn't get marked down on a paper for this, but it would be the difference between a grade and a + grade.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

I was talking about acceleration straight down due to gravity. You where trying to be a smart behind and it backfired. You could say I was even referring to the magnitude of acceleration. Bottom line, you made a play that backfired...


edit on 17-12-2016 by neutronflux because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Korg Trinity

I was talking about acceleration straight down due to gravity. You where trying to be a smart behind and it backfired. You could say I was even referring to the magnitude of acceleration. Bottom line, you made a play that backfire....


And the Yoke is on you even though you can't see it, it's still funny.




posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Show were g is defined as a negative?



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Korg Trinity

Show were g is defined as a negative?


Why not ask Elon Musk that Question...






posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Why would the collapsing floors not have an overall increase in magnitude of acceleration?

After each floor collapse, the mass and force of the falling material would increase resulting in a ever growing falling weight.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Show where g from a text book is defined as negative.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: Korg Trinity

originally posted by: neutronflux

You might want to refresh on your basic physics, because you just made a mistake out of simple ignorance trying to be cute.



WoooW!

This will make my colleges chuckle


Thanks for the advice... I'll look into that one

an acceleration of one G UPWARDS is a positive value.... oppsee your mistake...



In fact, doesn't little g and big G have very different uses in physics



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Korg Trinity

Show where g from a text book is defined as negative.


I knew it....

o.k. sure for that matter.... why not.

Simple reference.. but correct non the less..

gforces.net


The resistance to "negative" or "downward" g, which forces the blood towards the head, is much lower and is typically in the range of −2 to −3 g , or −20 m/s² to −30 m/s² range. The person can experience his vision turning red, which is also known as a red out. This is probably because the capillaries in the eyes swell up or burst under the increased blood pressure.


Perhaps you don't know about Scalar Fields...

Simply put, there is no difference between gravitational force and acceleration when talking about scalar fields... its all to do with how matter has potential energy through the object's rest Mass... the higher the Rest mass the more energy is required to move the mass...

Light for example has no rest mass and therefore it zips around and doesn't stop.... it can exert a force though and this is caused by relativistic mass....

But I digress...

a Negative G is of course a force pushing you towards the centre of gravity, which would create a scalar field equation that would mean the direction of G-force could be calculated.

It is for this reason that the full range of values is needed... you can't just negate the negatives... you would be calculating the opposite direction.

I suggest you read up on Scalar fields!

Korg.



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

What about little g in physics Vs big G and big G being positive or negative.....
edit on 17-12-2016 by neutronflux because: Fixed vs



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux

In fact, doesn't little g and big G have very different uses in physics


it does indeed, but in this case you can assume I'm referencing gravitational field.

Actually G could mean anything at all in say Calculus where numbers are in fact arbitrary values and can be represented by pretty much anything,



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Still waiting on the text book definition of little g in physics........



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Korg Trinity

Still waiting on the text book definition of little g in physics........


Are you serious?

I'm not your lap dog boy!

Go get yourself an education for crying out loud!



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

I bet you provide lots of laughs for your coworkers.


Big G in physics in reference to gravity....



www.universetoday.com...

The gravitational constant is the proportionality constant used in Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation, and is commonly denoted by G. This is different from g, which denotes the acceleration due to gravity. In most texts, we see it expressed as:

G = 6.673×10-11 N m2 kg-2



What negative or positive?

Little g in physics in regards to gravity


www.physicsclassroom.com...

In the first equation above, g is referred to as the acceleration of gravity. Its value is 9.8 m/s2 on Earth.




posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Mister technical, what to talk about positive or negative big G in conversations specific about gravity. Just saying.......



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:29 PM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: Korg Trinity

I bet you provide lots of laughs for your coworkers.


Big G in physics in reference to gravity....



www.universetoday.com...

The gravitational constant is the proportionality constant used in Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation, and is commonly denoted by G. This is different from g, which denotes the acceleration due to gravity. In most texts, we see it expressed as:

G = 6.673×10-11 N m2 kg-2



What negative or positive?

Little g in physics in regards to gravity


www.physicsclassroom.com...

In the first equation above, g is referred to as the acceleration of gravity. Its value is 9.8 m/s2 on Earth.




and??

I refer you to..

THIS POST

It's the context you seem to miss...



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: Korg Trinity

originally posted by: neutronflux

You might want to refresh on your basic physics, because you just made a mistake out of simple ignorance trying to be cute.



WoooW!

This will make my colleges chuckle


Thanks for the advice... I'll look into that one

an acceleration of one G UPWARDS is a positive value.... oppsee your mistake...



You wanted to play Mr Technical, but you don't know the most excepted symbol for the gravitational constant (G) from (g) the symbol most widely used for the value of gravitational acceleration.


edit on 17-12-2016 by neutronflux because: Corrected used



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