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All three F-35s fly together for MADL testing

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posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 12:26 PM
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The 461st Flight Test Squadron at Edwards AFB has been flying four and six ship missions involving all three F-35 versions together to ensure their datalink systems work together and to test the more advanced aspects of them.

In recent tests the aircraft flew in heavy Ground Based Air Defense areas to test the Enhanced Geo Location function of the aircraft, to find ground defense systems. They're also testing the ability to transmit data over MADL to disparate groups of F-35s, along with the stealthily aspect of the link.

www.edwards.af.mil...




posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Great story at the link. Thanks for that.

As I was reading about all the technological advancements, it made me wonder. Is it possible this will be the last the military's "manned" aircraft?



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

No. They're still years away from even trying to test an air to air UAV. The F-XX and F/A-XX will be flying before we even start to see a UAV in the air capable of taking their role on.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Hmmmm, well...I was just wondering, but it would seem logical to me; a combat fighter type vehicle as unmanned could pull far more fantastic maneuvers as the g forces wouldn't be a factor AND they could probably react much, much faster as they evolve out. I'd read.......(somewhere in the course of trying to read to the end of the Internet), that the Russians were looking at some concoction that involved a system whereby they'd use a manned Mig-31 Foxhound, which has true look down capability and is high altitude capable with the Foxhound "directing traffic" for multiple UAV fighter craft, in something like a 3 D picket formation. I think the project was cancelled due to costs and the lack of enough operable Foxhound aircraft.
edit on 9-12-2016 by TonyS because: edit to add



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

The F-35 will be capable of operating Loyal Wingman UAVs, which may well end up being retired F-16s and the like, but for long range control they need to be able to overcome the control lag.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: TonyS

The F-35 will be capable of operating Loyal Wingman UAVs, which may well end up being retired F-16s and the like, but for long range control they need to be able to overcome the control lag.


I suppose it would be much easier to overcome the lag with a system you can tell "shoot this down" "jam that site"
The data they will gather with the wingman UAV will be priceless. btw I went to that yard, some interesting stuff there, at least for me.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

Without some kind of near AI, other than an Arsenal Ship for a 5th Gen, they still wouldn't be a as useful for A2A work. Useful, yes, but if they get into a WVR fight they're in trouble.

We spent a couple weeks looking at that yard trying to identify all the bits and pieces.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: TonyS
True independent AI will require computing power and more importantly software sophistication comparable to human intellect. If you look at the development of chip architecture and take into account Moore's Law it will be at least 2035-2040 before the first chip sets are developed that will be capable of basic "human thought" type ability. However the software will take take at least that long and probably longer as in most regards software is much more of a complex problem. Take the F-35 as an example, the chip sets used in its systems were developed years ago and have in fact been superseded by better ones. The software they run, is still in development and constantly being debugged, and that's for a system that is probably only capable of a few percent of the complexity of a human like computer.

LEE.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Oh it´s still of interest, I´m not finished yet, and unlike you, I´m not an expert so I don´t even dare to think about identification of single parts. There are enough curious things to detect, even with my humble knowledge. I was actually surprised they´d leave such part laying around but then, there are enough high resolution photographs available on the net so why not.

I got a bit distracted and still try to figure out what the silver poles are for in the lower oval and if there is some kind of problem with the ground, like it´s getting swampy (see surrounding). Why the SE part of the field is secluded from the rest, was there an ULF antenna in the middle, is the upper part accessible for civilians, what purpose do the squares in the middle of the streets have, why is there an F22 (?) sitting on the tarmac like it´s in alert mode... I would have enough dumb questions on my mind to keep you busy for some time but I take my time to figure it out one after another if possible. I´m generally need my daily input of new informations or life get´s boring. This will keep me busy for some time, that´s sure. Grandchild is on a prolonged stay here, too so that´s a perfect morning coffee excercise.

Btw, of course I don´t expect any answers to the questions above, this is so far offtopic and most of the questions, I can find out with the help of a searchmachine.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

That's an RCS range. The F-15 is on one of the poles for a radar test. The other poles are to mount other aircraft.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

Signed for the true/strong/hard AI part. Unsigned for the chip architecture, been there, did that, have the tshirt. The little bugger at the left for example is part of a bigger hive, although most of the fireworks of each individuum takes place on remote ASICs some floors down. You´d be amazed, and this was some years ago, mind you.

It also takes several evolutions hardware and software wise. Most people forget that since AI is not static but dynamic, a learning factor is involved and also reflection. I don´t know how much you´re into the topic so I´ll give you a very crude example. Probably you´ve heard about compilers and what they do (convert human readable code into machine executeable).

What would happen if you(the programm in machine code) got a blueprint(the human readable) and a 3D printer (the compiler/linker) and you´re just smart(parallelism) enough to reflect(analyze) yourself. Maybe you would start making several sub copies of yourself and tell them to analyze each other, while you analyze how they perform, while, at the same time passing, down information without the need to learn but reflect since the underlying platform has changed slightly...

I stop now.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 05:21 PM
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Nice to see the project maturing, can't wait to see them out here in Aus!

Pity they couldn't get a B variant in there for ultimate PR shot but with all the F-35 now coming into testing it won't be long before a large fly past is shown!

Does anyone have a good link to the project, number of jets etc. Pilot teacher training, which country?

Thanks



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: Forensick

Most of the pilot training initially will be Luke AFB in Arizona for A models, and MCAS Beaufort in South Carolina for the B models. Some A model training will probably stay in Florida as well.

I'll try to find good data later if no one else does.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: Forensick

The F-35 web site should have the info you crave:

www.f35.com...




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