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Heroin deaths surpass gun homicides for the first time, CDC data shows

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posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:01 AM
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There are many contributing factors to our heroin epidemic.... Not the least of which is government:

US War In Afghanistan Is Fueling Global Heroin Epidemic & Enabling The Drug Trade

CIA Fueling New U.S. Drug Epidemic Using Cheap Afghani Heroin?; CIA, Obama Team Up to Hide Darkest Secrets

Given government's arbitrary crackdown on prescription opioids at the expense of patients' suffering --

Feds’ Pill Crackdown Drives Pain Patients to Heroin

Crackdown on prescription drug abuse hurts pain management patients

-- it would seem that the feds have decided to boost the illegal drugs over the legal drugs. (Not sorry, Big Pharma -- when you lay down with dogs, you get fleas).

I have pretty much lost patience with this war on people who use drugs, and I hold each and every one of us responsible for letting it happen. The solution is staring us in the face -- cannabis -- and yet, due to our own pathetic combination of ignorance and arrogance, we have collectively denied and criminalized its use. This is literally a crime against humanity. When/if society gets off its high horse and stops trying to play God, we'll figure this out.

Until then, shame on all of us.




posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:03 AM
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originally posted by: JakeR777
a reply to: intrptr

Haha the only logical and obvious conclusion would be our soldiers are UNDER ORDERS: a) smuggling it themselves or the more likely scenario b) they are in cahoots with and allowing a group to smuggle it out and sell it as much as they want w no fear of repercussions.


Corruption at the highest echelons? Nah, couldn't be. Worth noting British royalty paid for the Crown Jewels by addicting a continent to Opium. See Chinas Opium Wars.

Im not going to address Columbia and Noriega, LA crack scene, or how all South Florida got so wealthy..



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

I haven't followed the price of drugs, but it appears that heroin is relatively cheap..

www.theguardian.com...

How cracking down on America's painkiller capital led to a heroin crisis



For James Fata, the transition from prescription painkillers to heroin was seamless. The 24-year-old came to Florida to shake an addiction to opioid pills, but trying to go through rehab in a region known as the prescription capital of America proved too much. When a government crackdown curtailed his supply of pills, Fata turned to readily available heroin to fill the void. “The pills were hard to get. They got to be very expensive. Heroin is cheap,” said Fata, 24. “Almost everyone that I was close to, anybody that was doing pills with me, typically they would at least get to the point where pills were not an option. You were either snorting heroin or shooting heroin.


further


As heroin deaths in the US have more than tripled nationwide since 2010, critics say Florida’s efforts to contain an epidemic unleashed within its borders have only had limited effect in curbing one crisis while making another worse. Florida’s problems started after OxyContin swept on to the market in 1996, just as medical authorities began pressing doctors to pay greater attention to alleviating pain.

Unscrupulous businessmen in Florida spotted an opportunity. Within a few years, hundreds of pain clinics popped up around the state dispensing opioid pills to just about anyone who asked. Among the earliest and biggest was American Pain in the Miami-Fort Lauderdale metro area, with a pharmacy run by former strippers and doctors carrying guns under their white coats. It took in tens of millions of dollars a year selling OxyContin and generic versions containing oxycodone to people who travelled from Kentucky and West Virginia where painkillers were known as “hillbilly heroin”. They came south along the “Oxy Express” by bus or the carload, sometimes driven by dealers who took a cut of the pills. At one point, more than 90% of all the prescription opioids dispensed by doctors in the US were sold in Florida.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:18 AM
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Heroin is a lot cheaper these days and a damn sight more of it is on the market.

It's a LOT stronger/purer too.

In my town we've occasionally get bouts of overdose and being honest a lot of it is due to s stronger batch being sold and people didn't realize it's strength.

Obviously a lot more to it but it is a strong point.

Smack or heroin used to be viewed as nasty here in the UK, prescription addiction has added to it's use. My doctors has a notice board about how it will not give barbiturates/tranquilizers out lightly, so clearly there is an issue with addiction. One can guess what people will turn to if they lose their legal hit and it won't be weed or "uppers" per say.

It's dreadful, like society forgot how bad heroin addiction was in the past and allowed it to rear it's head again.

The stuff is cheaper now too. Considering it's price 30 years ago and the rate of inflation... It's a cheap fix. For say £30 nothing of equivalence is on the market.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: Martin75

I have never known someone who does heroin...where are all these people?

On a side note I know many people that smoke pot.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:43 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Martin75

I have never known someone who does heroin...where are all these people?

On a side note I know many people that smoke pot.


I suppose it depends on where you live. Different drugs are more readily available in different areas. I would say a good estimate is 1 in 3 people i went to school with 8 years later are now using heroine in my area.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:51 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Martin75

I have never known someone who does heroin...where are all these people?

On a side note I know many people that smoke pot.


These people are everywhere. To get my license as a pharmacist we had to attend 3 NA meetings just to give us a feel for how prevalent addiction was in our area. I live in a relatively small town, and the room is PACKED with people of all ages. One thing I noticed is that 75% (educated guess) of them are there for Heroin addiction.

I agree with the other posters blaming the Doctors. I get Rxs all the time for 120 vicodin 10/325, percocet 10/325, opana's, fentanyl patches, etc. Some people have chronic pain, and need relief, but understand that if these people were cut off of the meds, which has been happening because their doctors are being threatened by the DEA about losing their license if they write to many narc scripts, they will go through horrible withdraw.

I have seen people detoxing from pills in the hospital I was rotating through back in the day. Man, it is not pretty. Curled up in a ball, every synapse firing at once, sweating and cold, basically shatting their pants....terrible. That is why people turn to heroin......
edit on am1212201616America/Chicago09p08am by annoyedpharmacist because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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I have mixed feelings. On the one hand, I really feel sorry for these junkies. To be so addicted to something that nothing else matters in your life. I can't imagine. On the other hand, I despise them for being so weak to even try this sh*t and how they ruin communities and families. I just can't understand how someone even thinks trying that stuff even one time is "fun" or even necessary. It isn't like we haven't all seen wacked out H junkies.

Here in Chicago, there is definitely an epidemic. Heroine seems to be the drug of choice now. While both blacks and whites are users, you see a lot of these strung out white kids in really bad parts of town trying to score a hit. They all usually look the same. White. Young. Homeless. Typically, dreadlocks, dog or guitar, asking for money. You can tell from their hands and arms they shoot up as you can see tracks and swelling. Most look like they just hopped off a train from Portland, OR or Seattle, WA. You can spot them a mile away.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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edit on 9-12-2016 by Edumakated because: Duplicate post



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:58 AM
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I once saw an article that said

"Elderly drivers have almost as many accidents as teenagers.
The response "Stop old people from driving!!!" Stop elderly drivers!!!

Think about that for a minute.

Now we have "heroin surpasses gun violence deaths for once"

The response "stop heroin usage!!"

Think about it. Isn't it odd.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Come to my tiny town. While you could look, and not say who was using it, unfortunately I could show you at least 3, young people my son's ages, (20's) that are. I was crushed when I found out how many are using here. It has even beaten Meth in popularity here.

So sad.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Bo-

Did I ever Type You the story of the guy who broke His back/neck at work and at 1 time was on 7 Rx poisons for everything from Hypertension to PTSD w/the broke back/neck as something to fiddle with along the way? 2 of those 7 Rx meds are Norco™ (an extra strength Vicodin™ 10/325 instead of 5/500) and .25 Fentanyl™ and He started all this 12 years ago? He told Me He had an 'Epiphany' and after a series of lucid dreams, He was able to get rid of 5 of the 7 poisons but is still on the same dosage of the opiates. He told Me He started meditating and using Cannabis strains grown specifically for pain relief. If not I'll type You one day...

We would be remiss if We didn't delve in further to discuss the 'legitimate chronic pain sufferer' who has seen more and more hurdles placed in their pain management due to the actions of others. The person who takes some stock in their personal fitness and not expect the Dr. to give them a pill to cure their ails. These are the Ones who get off their couch and do what they can to improve their lot. Why this person should be ostracized because they're prescribed a narcotic. This in itself is a hurdle for many, when I come across these folks I tell them "It is the same as if it were for Diabetes or something along those lines..." In other words, "Who gives a snip what Your neighbor thinks, they're a plumber, not a Dr."

Who is to blame? There is PROOF (They can't get Us for 'fake news') that opium is being grown. There is PROOF it is being used.
Wait.... Why did We (collective) invade Afghanistan again? The same guys We (collective) trained and then armed to fight the 'Russkies' back before the intraweb?? Before Wolf Blitzer and CNN™ could massage and knead it for Us...


Stay Hydrated...



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Well, I can say, it's easier, and if it beats having to be treated like a criminal from a medical perspective and be ostracised, it is something you do consider.

by the same token, I just can't imagine getting addicted to heroine. you really need to go through hell before it becomes pleasurable. and personally, I don't want 2 days of sickness for a few hours of buzz.

bad enough with a bottle of jacks.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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I find this topic extremely interesting mostly in part because last I knew the United States has never been a producer of poppy, though I could be wrong. How is it we have an epidemic of a substance that is illegal and not produced here?? Must have a lot of help in making it so.
I lost three uncles to that sh#t so it hits home for me.
My neighbors educated daughter just got sentenced to a year in prison for almost killing two people driving high on dope. Ruins lives, it's deplorable. Stronger borders would go a long way imo.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: savemebarry

Withdraw is more than 2 days. For heavy users, the physical effects can last 5-7 days, with the worst parts being seen in the first 3. Even after that, the mental issues like serious depression can go on for months. I have read that it literally takes months for a heavy heroin addict to feel somewhat normal again......it is a terrible drug.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Martin75

Just wait until that Krokodil (Desomorphine) starts to make an appearance on our streets and inner city's and then you will see a real social epidemic.


en.wikipedia.org...

Not that this is not atrocious and sad beyond belief.

edit on 9-12-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: annoyedpharmacist

Oh I wasn't talking withdrawal. I was referring to the sickness you get starting out. Been there, done that. 6 months. Nothing heavy, just with people I knew at the time, and I can honestly say, having to wake up and puke for hours was not something I was going to push through to see the deal.

stopped me in my tracks.. I know everyone is different. I knew someone who used, and was a functional member of society for years, as long as everything was stable for him. even he ended up OD'ing.

I just, in my own experience, cannot see how someone gets so hooked. unless it is constant and unhindered. and may god have mercy on their souls, should they get beyond the stages of tolerance and try to stop. Then I know what withdrawals are like.

We have a lot of terrible drugs that we use but don't often consider a leash around our necks. tobacco, caffeine, alcohol... if they were suddenly denied us, I would bet a lot of people would be in dire straights. Nothing like this drug though. I do understand that....

But ultimately, it is prohibition that is killing people, not their addiction. every time.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: savemebarry

Not going to argue about the prohibition part being the problem. Unfortunately for me, and my profession, legalization isnt something we can actually push for as a group without our state licensing boards getting their panties in a bunch.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: savemebarry

Kratom™ is still legal.. It does WONDERS for opiate withdrawal..

heavy.com...

en.wikipedia.org...

www.bluelight.org...

opiateaddictionsupport.com...



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:28 AM
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originally posted by: JimNasium
a reply to: Boadicea

Bo-

Did I ever Type You the story of the guy who broke His back/neck at work and at 1 time was on 7 Rx poisons for everything from Hypertension to PTSD w/the broke back/neck as something to fiddle with along the way? 2 of those 7 Rx meds are Norco™ (an extra strength Vicodin™ 10/325 instead of 5/500) and .25 Fentanyl™ and He started all this 12 years ago? He told Me He had an 'Epiphany' and after a series of lucid dreams, He was able to get rid of 5 of the 7 poisons but is still on the same dosage of the opiates. He told Me He started meditating and using Cannabis strains grown specifically for pain relief. If not I'll type You one day...


I think you may have... you have given me so much to think about! But I wouldn't mind hearing it again. I have already learned so much from you -- hence my Afghanistan links! -- but sometimes it takes me a while for everything to sink in. Whatever I learned the first time you told me, I expect I would pick up even more the next time.


We would be remiss if We didn't delve in further to discuss the 'legitimate chronic pain sufferer' who has seen more and more hurdles placed in their pain management due to the actions of others. The person who takes some stock in their personal fitness and not expect the Dr. to give them a pill to cure their ails. These are the Ones who get off their couch and do what they can to improve their lot. Why this person should be ostracized because they're prescribed a narcotic. This in itself is a hurdle for many, when I come across these folks I tell them "It is the same as if it were for Diabetes or something along those lines..." In other words, "Who gives a snip what Your neighbor thinks, they're a plumber, not a Dr."


This is an excellent point and one that needs far more discussion and consideration. We have been conditioned to trust doctors and other medical professionals over our own judgment and capabilities, and brainwashed to believe we cannot take care of ourselves. Doctors definitely serve a valuable role in our healthcare; but we would all be far better off if we knew how to handle what we can ourselves, and knew when we need the professionals. My brother got himself off opiods by using medical marijuana, and he couldn't be happier. Not only is his pain well managed, but he doesn't have to deal with the nasty side effects of the opiates. My husband's aunt swore by turmeric for her arthritis, and said it worked better than any prescription pain med she ever took. It also visibly reduced the inflammation.

People do what they know. When they know better, they do better.


Stay Hydrated...


Always!



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