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A Simple Test Of The Simulated Universe Theory

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posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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First off, enter a deep state of relaxation, whatever it takes you to get to this state.

Arrange a clock, with a highly visible second hand, in front of you.

Concentrate.

Look at the clock, and the moving second hand. Now, close your eyes, or turn your head. Focused, look back at the second hand.

It should appear to take a little bit longer than a full second to register as "one second". I can duplicate this almost every time I try, and so should you. That second hand seems to take a slight pause.

What does this mean?

It could mean that the human brain takes a millisecond to adjust back to "time". (Time doesn't exist, it's a human invention, but that's another thread LoL)

It could however mean something entirely different. It could be a clue to our entire makeup and our surrounding environment. It could be a "glitch" in this reality. It could be, in that millisecond, a "scrolling effect", much like in a video game when you adjust your point of view. This particular simulation is highly, highly advanced to anything we could imagine. Much like the famous quote, and I paraphrase, any highly advanced technology would be observed as "magic" if far enough advanced than our own society.

Please try this experiment and post your results here....




posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:07 PM
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en.m.wikipedia.org...

This phenomena has been known about for a long time. It doesn't prove a simulated universe.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: Signals




(Time doesn't exist, it's a human invention, but that's another thread LoL)


You can believe what you want, but time is entropy.
Humans did not invent it and it an integral part of the universe.


Entropy is the only quantity in the physical sciences (apart from certain rare interactions in particle physics) that requires a particular direction for time, sometimes called an arrow of time.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: Matrix76

Interesting, but this scientifically unjustified explanation could merely be a quick fix solution to the exposure of the "matrix", Matrix76.

Much like a band-aid on a deep machete wound. In the beginning, you feel like it may work. But eventually, the bleeding gets you.

Are you really satisfied with your explanation? Can you be sure?



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

I disagree, time is 100% a human invention.

It absolutely did NOT exist before we came self-aware.

It doesn't even exist now, it is merely a way for you to get to your job without getting in trouble tomorrow.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:34 PM
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It's because of the movement you are watching. If I drive my mower for a couple of hours straight and stop to text or do anything it looks like the grass is moving away from my mower



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 12:58 AM
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Chronostasis is very similar to autokinesis.

Both are visual illusions.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: Signals
First off, enter a deep state of relaxation, whatever it takes you to get to this state.

Arrange a clock, with a highly visible second hand, in front of you.

Concentrate.

Look at the clock, and the moving second hand. Now, close your eyes, or turn your head. Focused, look back at the second hand.

It should appear to take a little bit longer than a full second to register as "one second". I can duplicate this almost every time I try, and so should you. That second hand seems to take a slight pause.

What does this mean?

It could mean that the human brain takes a millisecond to adjust back to "time". (Time doesn't exist, it's a human invention, but that's another thread LoL)

It could however mean something entirely different. It could be a clue to our entire makeup and our surrounding environment. It could be a "glitch" in this reality. It could be, in that millisecond, a "scrolling effect", much like in a video game when you adjust your point of view. This particular simulation is highly, highly advanced to anything we could imagine. Much like the famous quote, and I paraphrase, any highly advanced technology would be observed as "magic" if far enough advanced than our own society.

Please try this experiment and post your results here....



It could be that your not actually measuring time, your measuring your preseption...

Which is not measurable...



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: Signals
a reply to: charlyv

I disagree, time is 100% a human invention.

It absolutely did NOT exist before we came self-aware.

It doesn't even exist now, it is merely a way for you to get to your job without getting in trouble tomorrow.



I think you are confusing time with a clock lol..



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: Signals




(Time doesn't exist, it's a human invention, but that's another thread LoL)


You can believe what you want, but time is entropy.
Humans did not invent it and it an integral part of the universe.


Entropy is the only quantity in the physical sciences (apart from certain rare interactions in particle physics) that requires a particular direction for time, sometimes called an arrow of time.

Time is an imaginary measurement conceived to mark man's mortality.
That is all.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Signals
a reply to: charlyv

I disagree, time is 100% a human invention.

It absolutely did NOT exist before we came self-aware.

It doesn't even exist now, it is merely a way for you to get to your job without getting in trouble tomorrow.

Time matters not to an infinite universe.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

This is what I was thinking... weren't there conscious life-forms (at least on Earth) wandering around millions of years prior to the emergence of Homo Sapiens (and our distant cousins)? If time is the result of experience, wouldn't these creatures have been the "inventors" of time? Most, if not all animals, have internal clocks that drive biological processes and some seem to be able to use these internal clocks to schedule their lives... when is it time to mate... when is it time to return to the den... when is it time to migrate... when is it time to forage... Sure, some of these questions might be answered by observation or the grumbling or an animals stomach or the burning of loins, but other questions aren't so easily answered.

Dr. Suddendorf argues that these overlapping networks for mental time travel evolved at least 1.6 million years ago. He points to stone tools hominids made at that time. Paleoanthropologists have determined that the tools were moved many miles from where they were made. “If you’ve just eaten, the only reason you’re going to take a tool with you is if you anticipate using it in the future,” he said. Dr. Suddendorf has roused comparative psychologists to action — “like a red rag to a bull,” as one comparative psychologist, Sara Shettleworth of the University of Toronto, put it. They have been looking for evidence that animals can also plan for the future.

Some studies suggest not. Cebus monkeys, for example, will eat until they are stuffed and throw the rest of the food out of their cage, despite the fact that they will not have food the next morning.

But in other studies, animals show more promise. “We tested squirrel monkeys to see if they could anticipate the future, and to our surprise it looks like they could,” said Dr. William Roberts, a comparative psychologist at the University of Western Ontario. He and his colleagues ran a test in which they offered squirrel monkeys a choice between one piece of date or four. Not surprisingly, the monkeys took four.

But the scientists then began to take away water from the monkeys before they offered the choice. If the monkeys took four pieces, the scientists kept the water away for three hours. If the monkeys took one, the scientists returned the water in half an hour. The monkeys learned to choose one date. Even though they were not thirsty at the time, they anticipated becoming thirsty in the future. (If the scientists stopped withholding water, the monkeys went back to picking four pieces of dates instead of one.)

Read more about this including some fascinating experiments with birds at the following source link:
Time in the Animal Mind Source

edit on 1292016 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: Signals
a reply to: charlyv

I disagree, time is 100% a human invention.

It absolutely did NOT exist before we came self-aware.

It doesn't even exist now, it is merely a way for you to get to your job without getting in trouble tomorrow.

Time matters not to an infinite universe.


Disagree... time matters quite a bit to the universe (very unlikely to be infinite btw). Specifically, it is integral to the conservation of the precise speed of light from any and all reference points.

An example... if you are in a car traveling at 60mph and someone passes you going 70mph it would, from your perspective, appear the car passed you at a speed of 10mph. However, let's say you are traveling in a spaceship going 100k miles p/second and a light beam "passes" you going in the same direction, it would not appear to pass you at 86k mps (speed of light=186,000 - 100,000 your speed) but would in fact appear to pass you at 186k mps. How is this possible? Because the speed of light is absolute, it CANNOT change and so in order to produce what you MUST see (light at 186k mps), at high velocities time itself slows down to resolve the paradox, thus preserving an absolute speed of light. This is called time dilation and was discovered by Einstein but has been going on since the creation of the universe.

My point is that time is not absolute and can be stretched or compressed and without it there would be no way for light to always maintain an absolute speed, thus time itself is a key component of how the universe works. The measurement of time however, is a human invention and the universe takes no note of days and years.
edit on 9-12-2016 by Voiceofthemajority because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 07:12 PM
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how does our perception of time mean it doesnt exist? people just love to attribute phenomenon to their beliefs.



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: Voiceofthemajority
Ahh , the Time Dilation Parody. Did you know that Einstein never was sure of that himself ? That it took , what , 3 years to insert that ?



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: Signals
a reply to: charlyv

I disagree, time is 100% a human invention.

It absolutely did NOT exist before we came self-aware.

It doesn't even exist now, it is merely a way for you to get to your job without getting in trouble tomorrow.


So, you think animals do not have a sense of time? Why your dog or cat waits for you to come home, and is at the door about the time you walk through it, to a whale or porpoise, that can time the delays in the echo's of their voices to figure out when they are near something....and thousands of examples in between. No time is not a human invention, we just understand in the context of our own intelligence.

BTW: You could probably benefit from a course in Physics, specifically why the laws of thermodynamics explain just about everything we do know about this universe and understand what entropy really is.
edit on 9-12-2016 by charlyv because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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All science is based off of perception. We know the constants because we perceive them. We know length because we put a ruler next to an abject and perceive the number and equate a value to it. Two people, starting at the same point, go about their day. One is having a great day, and perceives the day as flying by. The other has a horrible day, and perceives the day as dragging by. They come together again at the end of the day. Which one do you choose as the perception to make your measurement by? Time is subjective. It is based on the observer and not linear. The two started and ended together, yet had very different perception of the length of time. Yes, a clock would register the same time passing, but the actual perceived time is grossly different. If the basis of time starts with a perceived time period, that same time period can not be what you point to for validation of time passing, if it is in dispute.
edit on 9-12-2016 by bill3969 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2016 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog
Quantum reality from deep inside
The quarks resonate out of time?



posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 04:05 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

My dogs and cats wait for me at the door because I feed them, not because they know what time it is....



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