It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Marine F-18 down-pilot missing

page: 2
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 12:19 PM
link   
a reply to: Bluntone22

There were two midair collisions tat resulted in three going down, the Canadian and one US were possibly target fixation and they flew into the ground, one went down returning from a post maintenance functional check flight....

All different causes, but all coming back to money somehow.




posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 12:20 PM
link   
a reply to: SonOfThor

1st MAW, I saw 115th but I haven't seen anything officially other than 1st MAW.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 01:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Two questions:

Wtf does "legacy Hornet" mean?

Why is he flying solo? What happened to that whole "don't leave your wingman" rah-rah type stuff? If I gotta have a buddy to take a dump in a field, why does a fighter pilot go up alone?



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 01:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

Legacy anything with fighters are early models. In this case the A-D model Hornets, as opposed to the E/F Super Hornet.

It may have been a functional check flight, or they may have separated to start a fight and something happened and the lead didn't see him go down. There are a few explanations for why he was alone.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 01:44 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6
If they haven't located the pilot yet, how do they know he survived?

I guessing that what they really mean was, they received a signal that the pilot ejected.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 01:52 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

They're not building these fast movers in China are they?
what the hell is wrong with the design?



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 02:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

gotcha. so it's not exactly a case of they sent him up aloft all by his lonesome and he crashed? that's really what I'm getting at I suppose. when I was at MCB Hawaii we'd see the P-3s go up by themselves, but they're not exactly fighter aircraft obviously.

as to the legacy thing - is this just a matter of slapping a fancy label on old airframes then?



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 02:34 PM
link   
a reply to: AndyFromMichigan

The ejection sequence is manually operated, so they know he was alive at that point. He may have come up on the radio, then stopped talking, or activated something manually. There are several ways you can survive an ejection but die before they get to you.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 02:37 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

The Super Hornet and the Hornet, to the layman look almost identical. It's a way of differentiating between the two quickly and easily.

Normally during training flights fighters always fly in pairs. That way the other pilot can help read checklists or troubleshoot, or if you go down mark your position. But there are a few exceptions to that rule.
edit on 12/7/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 02:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

gotcha and gotcha. thanks.

dig the new avi, btw!




posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 03:35 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

No word yet?



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 03:36 PM
link   
a reply to: TonyS

Nothing that I've heard.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 04:18 PM
link   
No one knows how the pilot ejected. Was he in a safe ejection envelope? Was he conscientious when he came down and was he wearing equipment to protect him against the cold water where he came down?

During the Korean War, pilots made safe bailouts and died of exposure in the 35* water in the Sea of Japan. You only have minutes of conscientiousness in cold water when he was uninjured.

When I hear of these accidents, I pray for these youngsters because you never know what they must endure.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 06:23 PM
link   
His Wingman initiated the search, but was forced to break off due to low fuel levels. That means the best person for knowing the area he went down left the area, through no fault of his own of course, which made the search harder.

More Japanese vessels and aircraft have joined the search. The search area has been expanded.
edit on 12/7/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 02:36 AM
link   
Word is that it may have been aircraft 163755, VMFA-115. Not confirmed officially.
edit on 12/8/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 07:16 AM
link   
a reply to: Aliensun

no word i assume?

i hope he's accounted for

if not i fear the worse



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 08:39 AM
link   
a reply to: buddah6

If you were flying over water, there used to be a chart that took into consideration the air temperature, water temperature and the sea state. If the number determined was below a certain level, pilots would wear a dry suit under their flight suits. It could be an 85 degree F. day in Jacksonville, FL, but, if the water temperature was low enough our pilots would be wearing dry suits and we would be wearing wet suits under our flight suits. It made pre-flight go quickly.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:22 AM
link   
Japanese search assets found him, but when asked if he was still alive the spokesperson said they didn't have that information.

abcnews.go.com...
edit on 12/8/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:25 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Nearly 24 hours in the water? Not very good odds I'd say



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 10:28 AM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

Yeah, unless he got into his raft, but if he did, what took so long to find him and why didn't he activate a Beacon or call on the radio.



new topics

top topics



 
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join