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You can be fined $250,000 for not calling people ‘ze’ or ‘hir,’ pronouns if they demand

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posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Wherever you would use "he" or "him" in conversation. Point to me which child needs an example of that and I'll consider it, but in your case I feel some restraint.




posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:37 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
Wherever you would use "he" or "him" in conversation.


Use the person's name. Child-level intelligence problem solved.

You may now continue your moral indignation and outrage.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: omniEther

That one is easy.

'Excuse me, Boss Person, the candidate is using the facilities.'

Or, if you are from Staten Island.

"Yo, Boss, dat new person is taking a dump.'

"The candidate is using the facilities"

Lol you have a point, but it'd be awful awkward forcing yourself to speak in that monotonous tone.
edit on 5-12-2016 by omniEther because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: omniEther

It does not have to be monotonous, you can add inflections wherever you like.

I suggest the 'yo' and the 'dump' portions. It really adds some punch and underscores the action taking place.






edit on 5-12-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: Zazz 2020!



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:47 PM
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Child-level intelligence and child-level language. I might be offended if being indignant and outraged at this doublespeak and apathy was a bad thing. Instead I'll take it as a compliment.
edit on 5-12-2016 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

I take it you ran out of examples since you used the same one twice.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 09:57 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: LesMisanthrope

I take it you ran out of examples since you used the same one twice.



I take it you cannot think of a time where you'd use he or she? What about a title? A preferred name?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Kind of nail on head, there. You could simply call people by the names they identify themselves with and skip the matter entirely.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:07 PM
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originally posted by: JohnnyElohim
a reply to: Blaine91555

Kind of nail on head, there. You could simply call people by the names they identify themselves with and skip the matter entirely.


Not that simple. It applies to pronouns as well.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:10 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope

originally posted by: JohnnyElohim
a reply to: Blaine91555

Kind of nail on head, there. You could simply call people by the names they identify themselves with and skip the matter entirely.


Not that simple. It applies to pronouns as well.


What would be an example of a situation where a proper noun or a less specific pronoun such as "they" or "them" would not suffice?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyElohim

Jim thought he could get here on time but he missed the bus.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: JohnnyElohim

Jim thought he could get here on time but he missed the bus.


Jim thought they could get here on time but they missed the bus.

It's how most people I know talk. You do it already when you are unsure of the identity of somebody as in "A person just rang the door bell, go see who they are"

It's a bit Schrodinger-ee but, in this case, you don't need to see if the cat is dead or alive (or the person is male or female); you just need to say that it's a person. Unless you know their correct pronoun (e.i. the one they tell you is correct), it makes more sense to just use they/them. Even then, a lot of people I know never use her/she/him/his/he because it's unnecessary and presumptuous.
edit on 5-12-2016 by Abysha because: spellinz goddammit



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: Abysha

"They" implies a group. Do you use "we" in reference to yourself?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:24 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: JohnnyElohim

Jim thought he could get here on time but he missed the bus.


"Jim expected to be on time but missed the bus."

It's a grammatical choice, not a necessity.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyElohim

In one sentence, sure, but in many, we simply do not operate in that way. If you need to, google "Why do we use pronouns?" and see if you agree. It's the most basic grammar.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Abysha

"They" implies a group. Do you use "we" in reference to yourself?



they T͟Hā/Submit pronoun 1. used to refer to two or more people or things previously mentioned or easily identified. "the two men could get life sentences if they are convicted" 2. used to refer to a person of unspecified sex. "ask someone if they could help"


That's actually how it's supposed to be used. There is nothing incorrect about using "they" when you wish to exclude the context of gender.
edit on 5-12-2016 by Abysha because: clarifying



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:27 PM
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So if it's okay to ignore what's politically correct, and not call someone transgender the pronoun they prefer, or call them the opposite because you're 'flustered and offended' with their behavior of 'asking to be addressed properly',

is it okay ignore the gender pronouns of straight or 'cis' people?

Can I just call men 'her' and 'she' and women 'he' and 'him' in general conversation and act like it's not offensive?
edit on 5-12-2016 by imjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: Abysha

The definition is exactly right, but not in the way you think.
edit on 5-12-2016 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: imjack




Can I just call men 'her' and 'she' and women 'he' and 'him' in general conversation and act like it's not offensive?


If you would be fined for doing otherwise, would you not be concerned?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 10:34 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Abysha

The definition is exactly right, but not in the way you think.


Yes it is. Exactly the way I think. When the gender is unspecified (by ignorance or choice), they/them is perfect English.



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