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More issues plague Russian Aircraft Carrier

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posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

OOOOHHHH MAN!!! that was wicked, that pilot must pinch a few loafs there, phew.

However, why was this large bulky plane able to recover but not a Su-33? Excuse me for my ignorance, but wouldn't he just hit the afterburner to gain some elevation?
edit on 5-12-2016 by Arnie123 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Wow I never notice how high in the water the deck is. Holy Crap!



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Arnie123

Like I said, if you don't react immediately, you're screwed. There are many many many examples of US fighters not recovering and the pilots ending up in the water after ejecting. You have about a second to recognize that the cable broke, go to full power, and pray that your engines spool up in time to recover.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:55 PM
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By the looks of that cable snapping back and the crew running in that direction, I am assuming someone got hit by the cable. Am i wrong? I hope i am. a reply to: Zaphod58



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: Pyle

It's somewhere in the vicinity of 60 feet from flight deck to water.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: LordOfDestruction

There were 8 injuries on the flight deck, none fatal. They ranged from cuts to a fractured skull. The Hawkeye came within 20 feet of the water. Total damage to the carrier and aircraft on the deck was around $200,000.
edit on 12/5/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: LordOfDestruction
By the looks of that cable snapping back and the crew running in that direction, I am assuming someone got hit by the cable. Am i wrong? I hope i am. a reply to: Zaphod58



Like this?




posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Arnie123

The Russian Navy has had a serious funding problem in the last 15-20 years. So many of their ships and subs are just sitting and corroding away in ports. They're trying to get going again, but it's going to take time, and a lot of money. The Kuznetsov was commissioned in 1990. She's getting up there, and has had problems from the go. It's not easy to build a carrier, even for an experienced navy like Russia's.


hey zap...I've heard that the whole cable system has to be configured to the weight and speed of the incoming plane, is this true?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

Not so much speed, but weight. They calibrate the system to the weight of the aircraft as it's coming in to land, and it uses a hydraulic system to put resistance on the cable based on the weight.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58 Wow! All that within seconds, and that does not sound that bad at all, I mean I feel for the men who were injured but it could have been a lot worse. Like you said, quick thinking.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58 Does the cable usually snap in the middle or does it snap where it is hoisted to the ship?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: LordOfDestruction

I was shocked that no one was killed when I heard about it. It usually always ends with at least one death.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: LordOfDestruction

A lot of the time it's the cross deck pendant, but it can be either depending on why it breaks.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: jimmyx

Not so much speed, but weight. They calibrate the system to the weight of the aircraft as it's coming in to land, and it uses a hydraulic system to put resistance on the cable based on the weight.


thanks, so the speed of a prop plane or a jet are not significant, but their weights are? I thought they still flew the 2-prop AWACS plane off of a carrier.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

The landing speeds are pretty low for both. Speed does play a role in stopping the aircraft, but the bigger concern is weight. One of the causes of the March cable break was that they put the improper weight into the system. The cable had a previous fault code that was improperly diagnosed, and the wrong weight was put in. This meant the system transferred most of the weight to the cross deck pendants, which snapped.

This is a pretty good description of the Arresting Engine from Wiki.


Each pendant has its own engine systems that absorb and dispel the energies developed when a landing aircraft is arrested. Carriers use hydro-pneumatic systems, each weighing 43 tons,[9] wherein oil fluid is forced out of a cylinder by a ram (that is connected to the purchase cable) through a control valve.[10] A major development in arresting gear was the constant runout control valve, which controls the fluid flow from the engine cylinder to the accumulator and is designed to stop all aircraft with the same amount of runout regardless of the weight and speed. The aircraft's weight is set by the arresting gear engine operator. The operator is given the weight of the aircraft by the air officer in Primary Flight Control. The operator then sets the Constant Runout Control Valve to the appropriate weight setting for that aircraft. The pressure setting for the arresting gear engine remains at a constant pressure of about 400 pounds per square inch. The constant runout valve (CROV) stops the aircraft (as opposed to hydraulic pressure).

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58 I was also surprised, it seemed like a lot of people would get really hurt especially with that cable snapping back like that, plus all the damage to the planes as well. Thank you for taking your time to clarify, I am learning a lot.




edit on 5-12-2016 by LordOfDestruction because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: LordOfDestruction

We got to go below decks to the arresting gear room and see the system while one of the carriers was in port. The whole system was freaking huge.



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58 I checked it out, it does look pretty huge. I am assuming its very loud when it is operational, is it a pneumatic system?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm curious, are these the ONLY systems and known ways?

Are there future plans for different systems, similar to the arresting system?



posted on Dec, 5 2016 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: LordOfDestruction

It is definitely loud. My bunk on the USS Independence was right under the three wire. (the one that all of the planes go for)
There is a loud THUMP! (the plane's landing gear hitting the flight deck) and then a long SCREETCH! (the arresting cable running through their guide pulleys) When everything is going right they can land a plane about every 90 seconds. After about a week on board you don't notice it anymore.



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