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Tree of Life(Recommended Reading)

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posted on Feb, 2 2005 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Tamahu
Is that really the name of a particular 'Zen' school? Or are you implying that said school was of a pseudo-Zen type?


No, it's my label; "hippie/beatnik Zen" to describe a pop culture interpretation of Buddhism that was common with young Americans in the 1950's and 1960's, much of which owed its existence to writers, poets, and musicians like Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and the Beatles. Likewise, the poet Ginsberg coined the term "bop Kabalah" (featured in his poem "Howl") for similar reasons, i.e., unorthodox but popular.




So good leisure reading, but not necessarily geared for the serious initiate?


I would agree that it is good leisure reading, even for the serious student; however, much of the book is autobiographical and ancedotal, and is not what I would consider a scholarly treatise on the subject. Nevertheless, it's insightful and fun, and I think it's important for us not to get too caught up in seriousness that we can't enjoy and learn about other people and things at the same time.





I thought Tamahu was female?


Why?

I thought you mentioned one time that you were a woman, but I could have been mistaken.

[edit on 2-2-2005 by Masonic Light]




posted on May, 3 2005 @ 08:24 PM
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Peace Masonic Light

(I'm not even sure if you still post here, but I wanted to bump this thread anyway and thought I'd reply
)




Originally posted by Masonic Light
No, it's my label; "hippie/beatnik Zen" to describe a pop culture interpretation of Buddhism that was common with young Americans in the 1950's and 1960's, much of which owed its existence to writers, poets, and musicians like Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and the Beatles. Likewise, the poet Ginsberg coined the term "bop Kabalah" (featured in his poem "Howl") for similar reasons, i.e., unorthodox but popular.



I'd definitely call that pseudo-Zen.



I would agree that it is good leisure reading, even for the serious student; however, much of the book is autobiographical and ancedotal, and is not what I would consider a scholarly treatise on the subject. Nevertheless, it's insightful and fun, and I think it's important for us not to get too caught up in seriousness that we can't enjoy and learn about other people and things at the same time.



True indeed.



I thought you mentioned one time that you were a woman, but I could have been mistaken.



Nope, not a woman.



posted on May, 3 2005 @ 08:59 PM
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And also, ML; have you had a chance to study "The Initiatic Path in the Arcana of Tarot and Kabbalah" yet?



posted on Aug, 28 2005 @ 02:43 PM
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Other than the writings of S. L. MacGregor Mathers, Wynn Westcott and Dion Fortune; I've always been a bit wary of anything else from the Golden Dawn.

But after reading what Dion Fortune herself has said about the following book, I may go ahead and give a read if only to supplement my studies:


The Tree of Life: A study in Magic


It supposedly contains most, if not all of the info that Aleister Crowley provided in his "Liber 777", though, without the invocations that would attract demons from the Klipoth.


(I agree, that it was a bit careless for Dion Fortune to cite A. Crowley's work in her "Mystical Qabalah", even though she recognized the 'pitfalls' he purposefully put in it for the ignorant practitioner, who would get a nasty surprise especially if they are not actually trying to contact demons and black magicians)


Anyway, I'd suggest to only use Israel Regardie's book as an outline and that the works of Samael Aun Weor and Ra Un Nefer Amen, would be best to apply for practical use; as they have made many corrections regarding the mistakes which have been made in the works of previous Kabbalists(not mention the info that's not even availible in the older books) .



Hotep



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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I know this is very old thread but I wanted to find out if anyone has any updated links for some of the ones in the thread as they don't work anymore.

Alternatively, any new recommended reading lists and/or websites.

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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Im gutted that i missed out on this thread when it was new. Very good that you mentioned how Daath is missed out, infact nearly everything on the net is not completely right, but Daath is a very important part, so if it is not mentioned it would be best to move on to something else. The true art of this is taught through word of mouth aswell, so be cautious with things you read in books and the internet.

I can't remember the name of the book, but next time im with someone who knows the title i will be sure to ask and post the title of the book up.

Could you please make a thread about Tibetan-Rites-of-Rejuvenation exercises. I would be very interested in this


Peace



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by Maya00a
I know this is very old thread but I wanted to find out if anyone has any updated links for some of the ones in the thread as they don't work anymore.

Alternatively, any new recommended reading lists and/or websites.

Thank you.


Just wanted to bump and ask the same question as above.

I'm still reading and learning but there is just so much information available that a little guidance is always preferable.



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